380 VS 9mm: Ammo Comparison, Guide, And Review

380 VS 9mm: Ammo Comparisons

Gun enthusiasts are constantly comparing popular ammunition to find the best bang for their buck. Some ammo types rank higher than others for many reasons. However, there are a few calibers that are equally popular and suitable for their individual purpose. For example, the 380 vs 9mm.

The long-brewing comparison between the 380 and the 9mm falls in the above category. Consumers buy either for self-defense. There are slight differences to pay attention to that make one better over the other, and sometimes these differences depend on the firearm used. These differences present themselves in regards to ballistics performance, recoil, price, and many more aspects.

We have presented a comprehensive comparison between the .380 ACP and the 9mm calibers in this page. Before we begin, take a look at a quick overview of both self-defense cartridges.

.380 ACP: Overview

380 ACP

John Browning designed the .380 ACP that Colt in the U.S. introduced in 1908. The nickname “9mm Browning” salutes its creator. Built for self-defense purposes, it has a rimless and straight-walled case.

The .380 ACP features 9.5mm base and rim diameter, a case length of 17.3mm, and overall length of 25mm. The .380 has a shooting velocity of about 1050 feet per second. Primarily used as a self-defense cartridge, police officials use it as a backup pistol. This caliber is preferable by beginner shooters due to its low recoil and secure handling.

9mm: Overview

9mm

The 9mm, or the 9×19 Parabellum, features German engineering designed by Georg Luger. It was then launched in 1902 by the firearms brand DWM for their Luger semi-automatic pistol. Over time, though, it went through various iterations. Since then, several different variants have been launched.

Primarily designed for military use, the standard cartridge is used by NATO forces and by other law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and other countries use this standard cartridge because of its initial design for primarily military consumption. The 9mm is also highly prevalent in the self-defense domain.

The 9mm features a rimless but tapered case with a bullet diameter of 9mm. The overall length of the cartridge is considerably longer than the .380, at 29.69mm and a case length of 19.15mm. Depending on the ammo used, it performs a shooting velocity between 950 to 14,500 feet per second.

380 VS 9mm: Comparison

While the .380 ACP is often considered interchangeable with the 9mm due to the same diameter, they are not the same at all. The two are distinguishable from each other due to different shell length and structure.

Let’s take a look at their distinct features and how they compare against each other.

Performance

The 9x19mm Parabellum wins when it comes to performance. The 9mm has a heavier cartridge with a longer shell length and can produce more energy. The Parabellum creates a maximum velocity of 1,400 feet per second as opposed to the maximum 1000 feet per second produced by the .380. The longer shell length equips the cartridge with more powder capacity, therefore providing higher velocity and more power.

Consequently, the bullet fire by 9mm does more damage than one fired by the 380. The stopping power of 9mm rounds is higher, and it packs a lot more pressure. This pressure enables the bullet to expand more than the 380 can.

Recoil

recoil

The better the performance, the higher the recoil. More force and higher velocity produce a more significant recoil. A recoil of this magnitude can be uncomfortable to inexperienced shooters and a possible hindrance in the case of an emergency.

The .380 ACP produces less energy and does less major damage. It has lower recoil than the 9mm because of the limitation on power. Therefore, it is easy for beginners to use during self-defense situations. Smaller amounts of gunpowder are used, and the force produced is not as intense. The recoil has less impact, making it easy to reacquire the target after firing.

Target Penetration

Target

The scope of damage to a target depends upon the projectile’s extent of penetration. The 9mm has considerably more penetration power than the .380 ACP.

9mm rounds have a sleeker shell which builds more firepower and force behind an ejecting bullet. Therefore, all factors combined, the cartridge can penetrate over 13 inches, causing substantial damage. The .380, on the other hand, packs lower velocity shooting power which limits its penetration to 9 inches.

The 9mm has the edge over the .380 ACP in the sense that a bullet fired through the 9mm has a better chance and scope of tearing down the target by traveling entirely through it.

Shooting Accuracy

When it comes to self-defense, accuracy is one of the most important factors to prevent you from harm.

Since the .380 has lower recoil, it fires with more accuracy. When you have less power against you, the pistol fires with greater accuracy because it is easier to maintain target sight. Higher recoil can throw off the accuracy of your sightings between each round. However, the .380 ACP is mainly for very short ranges due to the low velocity and pressure. It cannot be expected to hit a long-range target with equal accuracy as the 9mm.

In the end, though, the accuracy highly depends on the experience and the skill of the shooter.

Size

The .380 has the same bullet diameter as that of the original 9x19mm Parabellum, more commonly known as the 9mm. However, 9mm rounds are bigger and require a larger pistol. The .380 ACP rounds are shorter in size and do better with small pistols.

The .380 rounds are shorter and fire with less force. Pistols of subcompact size easily carry concealed with this type of ammunition. The .380’s lightweight design remains discreetly hidden and draws quickly and with ease. For this, It is commonly used as a backup firearm.

Pricing

The increasing popularity of the 9mm cartridges has made them widely available and lowers their rates. Currently, you can buy them at a more affordable price than the .380. Most buyers save .380 rounds for a specific purpose and do not use them often. Therefore, the economics of supply and demand come into play. The 9mm has a more extensive supply because of higher demand. The market for .380 directly ties to backup carry guns.

Logically, rounds for the .380 ACP cost more compared to the 9mm.

Practical Use
The ballistic performance of the .380 does not hit the mark when compared to the 9mm. The .380 ACP works better as a secondary weapon rather than the primary. The smaller size makes it easy to carry and conceal, though.

The 9mm is the standard ammunition NATO armies and other non-NATO militia, along with major law enforcement agencies, use to arm themselves. It is available in compact pistols with more magazine round capacity. The 9mm is ideal for experienced shooters as self-defense or military use.

Ammo Options

There are many options available for both 9mm as well as .380 ACP. The suitability for self-defense and military operations differ. The 9mm dominates the military end of the market, while the .380 ACP commonly sticks to the self-defense arena.

The top options of ammunition for the .380 include Liberty Civil Defense 50 grain SCHP, Hornady Custom Ammunition 90 grain, Remington 88 grain HTP, and SIG Sauer 90 grain 380 V-Crown JHP. All these bullets are ideal for self-defense and have short rounds suitable for pocket pistols. For a pocket pistol using .380 ACP, a 90-grain projectile will be the most effective for defense because of its penetration capability and higher velocity.

The 9mm’s best options for ammunition include Federal HST 9mm 124 grain, Federal HST 9mm 147 grain, American Eagle 9mm 115 grain, and Blazer Brass 9mm. Notice that the 9mm bullets weigh more than the ones used for .380 ACP,  due to the higher caliber and case length of 19.5mm. The penetration of these bullets ranges between 12 to 18 inches.

.380 VS 9mm: Are they Interchangeable?

While the 380 ACP and the 9x19mm Parabellum are often thought to be interchangeable because of the similarity in bullet diameter, they are too inherently different to use in place of one another.

Yes, the diameter for both the cartridges is 9mm. However, the 9mm has a considerably longer shell than the .380. The lengthy shell means more powder capacity and power. The .380 has smaller size and length which make it unsuitable for magazines specific to the 9mm.

When you use more powerful ammo in a firearm not suited for that power, it can backfire and cause damage. Using a shorter .380 round in the magazine built for a longer 9mm case is a hazardous mistake to make.

Choosing the Right Cartridge

9mm wins over the .380 in terms of performance and power. The German-engineered cartridge packs more punch with a longer shell length, more caliber, and higher shooting velocity. It uses heavier bullets with better expansion to hold better penetration.

The .380 is better in terms of ease of use, though. A smaller amount of force exerted results in less recoil impact. Subcompact pocket pistols often call for .380 ammunition. Subcompact pistols are not a haggle to carry and have excellent concealability. Also, even though the .380 packs less force, it is a reliable cartridge for self-defense in short-range situations.

Military and law enforcement agencies have adopted the 9mm because of its reliability in the case of an emergency, self-defense, or attack circumstance. Close-range self-defense shooting suits the .380 best.

A lot goes into 380 vs 9mm comparison, and odds are you won’t get a definitive answer. Take your pick according to your purpose and means. You will not go wrong with either.

Clip vs. Magazine: What You Really Need To Know


Most of us wouldn’t care much if we interchanged the words “clips” with “magazines”. It is, however, crucial to realize that they are not the same and come with a considerable difference. We will be covering all the relevant details that you need to know between a clip and magazine in this article.

We have all marveled at the ease with which Arnold Schwarzenegger has handled his guns in movies like Predator and The Terminator. While the on-screen effect seemed unbelievable and mind-blowing, there is more to guns and ammunition than rippling muscles and adrenaline!

In this article, we will be exploring gun terminologies namely “clips” and “magazines” and throw some light on factors like how they are not the same and how will you be able to identify one from another and prevent a foot-in-the-mouth moment the next time you are discussing guns and ammo within your social circle.

Clip vs. Magazine

It is very important to be familiar with the terms used in a particular subject when you are discussing it. Having a sound knowledge of the subject would give you an added advantage to make your mark when you are conversing about it with your family members, friends or peers.

Just as we tend to use specific terms like offensive backfield, quarterback and fullback while discussing football, we would also need to get acquainted with the specific terms that are generally used in the area of guns and ammunition.

Clips and magazines are the two terms which are used interchangeably quite often and one is mistaken for the other. This is not true and there is a large difference between the two when it comes to their design, composition and usability in a gun.

A clip refers to a device that is used to store rounds of ammunition in a single pack. This means that it holds together individual rounds of ammunition and helps to keep them as one. It holds the ammo together so that it can be loaded easily into a magazine or a firearm cylinder.

A magazine, on the other hand, is a device that is designed to hold ammunition together and keep it ready to be fired when required. It loads the ammo into the chamber of the firearm.

Since these definitions may take time to sink in, it is quite easy to spot the reason behind the confusion created by these terms. In simple words, a clip comes in handy while feeding rounds into a magazine when required while a magazine is used to feed rounds into the firearm chamber in return.

When To Use What

Now that we have cleared the fog surrounding clips and magazines, it is quite apparent that the two are very different from each other and one cannot be substituted in place of the other. It is now important to understand when to use which term when there is a discussion about guns and ammunition.

A clip is a usually created out of a steel stamping and are engineered in different patterns depending on the type of gun into which it is to be loaded. Their main function is to load ammunition into a magazine that loads single rounds for firing.

Rifles come with a detachable and a non-detachable setting and the clips used in each type vary in their design. For riles that come with a non-detachable magazine, the clips are used to load bullets directly into the firearm. A clip can be loaded into a detachable magazine but such a setting is uncommon and not frequently seen.

A magazine is essentially an area from where ammunition is fed into the firing chamber as and when required. A magazine can be fitted internally into a firearm or it can be removable. It is almost the size of the gun itself that is responsible for feeding ammo into the firearm chamber.

A clip is smaller in size and therefore cannot hold more than 10 rounds while magazines have a larger capacity and are capable of holding up to a 100 rounds.

Types Of Clips

Since clips are used to load ammunition into the magazine, they are compact and are easy to load. They also help in saving a lot of time which would otherwise have been spent on loading ammo every time you fired from the gun. These clips come in various forms and can be used in a wide variety of guns that are available today.

Stripper Clip

This kind of a clip is used to load internal box magazines where a stripper clip binds the ammunition together on a piece of metal and keeps it ready to be loaded. This is the most widely used type of clip that is available today.

In order to use this clip, you will need to position it on top of the magazine and give it a push down into the magazine to load it in bolt-action rifles or semi-automatics. It can also be used in a detachable magazine by using the same operating mechanism.

  • Original Russian Made Pouch
  • 5 stripper clips (repros)
  • Cleaning kit

En Bloc Clip

An En Bloc clip is an ejectable clip that is automatically discarded from a gun once all the ammo has been used up. It is inserted completely into the magazine which pushes the rounds up into the chamber and keeps them ready for action.

This clip is found in old guns and is not very popular today due to the availability of stripper clips and their ease of use.

Half Moon/Full Moon Clip

These are the classic ones that we have seen in movies where the round chamber within a revolver rotates to load a fresh bullet after the previous one has been fired. These clips are usually seen in revolvers with pistol cartridges such as 0.45 Auto and 9mm.

A half moon and a full clip can hold 3 and 6 rounds respectively as they can be easily inserted into the firing cylinder of a revolver. While this type has faced a stiff competition from speed loaders, their advantage is that they help to discard the shell casings almost immediately after the rounds are fired.

Types Of Magazines

Magazines are available in a variety of types today. While some are detachable, the others are internally attached. Some even have the capacity to feed the rounds directly from the tube! We will be discussing a few of these types in this article.

Box Magazine

This is the most common and the most famous type of magazines that can be seen today. It comes in two variants - the internal box magazine and the detachable box magazine. The loading and firing mechanisms may be a bit different from each other but their functions remain the same more or less.

It is commonly seen in bolt action rifles and in the older versions of semi-automatic rifles like the SKS and M1 Garand. The magazines can be loaded in two ways - through the top of the gun or with the use of clips.

Detachable Box Magazine

Magazines are a tool to load the ammo straight into the firing chamber so that it could be used when the need arises. A detachable box magazine is also one of the most preferred types of magazine that is in demand today and is seen in popular rifles like the AR-15, Ruger 10/22, semi-automatic rifles and AK variants.

In this, the detachable box stays apart from the firearm despite it is loaded. This makes it a safe and also makes it quicker to use when the need arises. It is also easy to carry and transport than many other magazines.

STANAG Magazine

These magazines are designed according to the NATO agreement that permits soldiers to exchange their rifles even though the models are different. This magazine is designed to fit with rifles of different makes like 5.56mm and firearms belong to AR, M16 and M4 families along with others like IMI, Beretta and SIG.

Tubular Magazine

Firearms come with a fixed magazine in the form of a tube that uses the combination of a tube, a spring and the trigger to load ammo into the firing chamber. The rounds can be loaded one at a time into the magazine from where they are loaded into the firing chamber.

This type of a magazine is usually seen in firearms like .22 rifles, shotguns and lever action rifles.

Other Gun Terms That Are Wrongly Used Interchangeably

1. Grip vs. Handle

“Handle” and “grip” are frequently the same elements when talking about many items humans use daily. Knives, scissors, and other tools all have handles and grips, and the two terms both talk about the part of the thing you put your hands on. But when we are talking about guns, these two terms are not interchangeable. Usually, when you’re talking about the handle or the grip, you're just trying to say grip.

Term grip is talking about to the part of the gun that you hold in the form you take as you open fire. The grip is what helps you aim, use the trigger, and safety.

On the other hand, handles are the part of a gun that you can hold onto when you are carrying it around. This isn’t the part you grip to fire the weapon. It’s all about carrying it around. If you were to mix these two up, you'd look pretty silly.

2. Precision vs. Accuracy

To some people, the various meanings between “accuracy” and “precision” don’t make much of a difference. But if you want to become an improved shooter, and be knowledgable on the topic, the difference is actually very significant.

Accuracy is talking about the proximity your shot is to the target. If you fire the shot in the bullseye, then you had an accurate shot.

Precision means how tight your group of shots is. If you fire an entire barrel and the grouping of all the shots fired is in the same clumped area then your shoot was precise.

If you are a good shooter, your fire will be both accurate and precise. A good rule of thumb to keep in mind for both outcomes is that you need to place a harmonious number of shots close enough to your target. If this is a struggle for you, training and practice can help a ton to reach the goals of being precise and accurate. Aim to get both outcomes, not just one or the other. This is the practice of a good shooter.

Some tips to help you achieve these two terms: pay special close attention to the shots that do get close to the target. Become aware. Take note of what exactly your posture and position when you made that shot. Once you realize your form and the reason for success, practice duplicating it every time you shoot. This can increase your precision and accuracy.

3. Pistol vs. Handgun

In the shooting world, it really depends on what kind of person you are. Some use these two terms interchangeably, while others fight you to the core that they are separate, and should not be used as one and the same. With this term specifically, it’s truly up to you which you use. Let's discuss.

The term "handguns" should speak of any gun that is held in your hand and then fired.  Usually smaller, these don’t set up camp on your shoulder like rifles or shotguns.

4. Fully Automatic vs. Machine Gun

Machine guns and fully automatic guns don’t mean the same thing in every instance, though they can. This is another instance where the two words are similar in meaning but distinct enough to be important.

Fully automatic applies to the firing mode that's set up on a gun. Depending on the mode, one pull of the trigger can fire tons of bullets, but one at a time. Machine guns are fully automatic, and the law lumps all of these and fully automatic guns into the same, controlled categories.

All machine guns are fully automatic weapons, but not all fully automatic weapons are necessarily machine guns. The determining factor is how long and fast they are meant to be fired for. These two terms can be pretty confusing, but the good news is that they are not super vital to keep separate. It is mostly a matter of your own personal preference.

5. Silencer vs. Uppressor

This one is more difficult to pin down than the two before it. The term “silencer” is not the proper term, but it is said frequently. If you want to get technical, then suppressors will describe it accurately.

Suppressors are parts that connect to the barrel of your gun to reduce the loudness of a gunshot. They don’t completely eliminate the sound, so do not get your hopes up. What they are technically doing is stifling the amount of air being released at the point of release in order to restrict the sound, and therefore get the loudness under control.

The term "silencer" was coined from the entertainment industry. It has been said in movies, TV shows, and podcasts, but it is not an accurate phrase, and does not represent what is happening to a gun correctly.

6. Negligent Discharge vs. Accidental Discharge

Knowing how to decipher between accidental and negligent discharge is vital. This is because correctly using the terms can change the public’s comprehension of firearms and the safety that's involved. When people use the term “accidental discharge” inaccurately, it’s strengthening the idea that guns are innately bad. This is not true. Actually, the majority of crimes called accidental discharge covered aren’t accidents. They are intentional.

Accidental discharge is when your gun fires involuntarily because of an unexpected and essentially unpreventable failure of the weapon. This happens rarely, almost never, unless there is a built-in issue already present.

Negligent discharge is most common. This is when the gun fires because of unsafe use or negligence toward the weapon.

The reason these two distinctions are so crucial to make is that negligence is preventable by using proper safety and accidental is not, because it cannot be avoided or foreseen.

When a gun fires while in the holster, this is usually negligent in nature because the gun owner left the safety on. This could have easily been avoided if safety was applied. Though this isn't a reason for applause at all, naming it correctly takes the guilt off the gun itself and puts where it applies, which is on the negligence of the gun owner.

Shoot It!

We have covered already covered the basics related to clips and magazines along with the differentiation that proves that they are not the same and can definitely not be used interchangeably. There is always a lot of information available for you to read up in case the talk about guns and ammo fascinates you.

Being able to tell a clip from a magazine with add to your credibility the next time you are out discussing guns with your social acquaintances or taking shooting lessons from the experts. The easiest way of distinguishing the two would be to know that a magazine comes with a spring while a clip does not!

Rimfire VS Centerfire: Ammo Comparisons – Max Blagg

Rimfire vs Centerfire

There isn’t a lot of difference on how guns work. The major difference lies in the type of primer ignition system used in the gun which leaves beginners in a fix as they constantly wonder about the better primer ignition option between rimfire vs. centerfire.

The functioning mechanism of guns is designed on the same concept. A powder charge is filled in a pipe that is sealed from one end. Ignition in the powder charge stimulates an explosion where a projectile is launched from the sealed end of the pipe.

The question of choosing one ignition mechanism over the other depends on the purpose for which a gun is going to be used. These activities include using a gun for hunting or simply learning to shoot at a shooting class.

Modern bullets use one of the two primer ignition systems - rimfire or centerfire where each mechanism has its own purpose and uses. The major difference between these two ignition mechanisms is their design and method of operation.

We will be exploring the details of rimfire vs centerfire in this article and help you understand the niches in which they operate along with their working mechanisms and differences.

Parts of a Cartridge: Both Rimfire and Centerfire

Every cartridge, or "round" in other words, has four parts to it: 

  • Bullet (not the entire cartridge, just the projectile)
  • Propellant
  • Primer
  • Case
  • It doesn't matter if the cartridge is centerfire ammunition or rimfire ammunition, these four components exist in every single cartridge. Generally, all bullets work the same way. The firing pin hits the primer, and that creates a very small explosion.

    The small explosion that it creates will set off the gunpowder, and that forces the bullet to shoot forward, out of the gun through the barrel.

    So, where exactly is the difference between centerfire vs rimfire ammunition? That lies within where the primer is located.

    What Is Rimfire?

    Rimfire

    A rimfire cartridge was first used in the year 1845 and was made by evenly distributing the primer inside the rim pipe. It worked wonders as the cartridge was one-piece and did not require any assembly before firing. The single piece structure also helped to prevent the entry of dirt, dust and moisture inside the cartridge and made it very convenient to use.

    Rimfire design faced two major challenges during the initial period. The first was to distribute the primer evenly at the base of the cartridge. Then, the second was the need to utilize a soft metal for the construction of the rim.

    The rim was needed to be created out of a highly malleable metal so that it could be dented easily by the firing pin. Copper was the most preferred choice but it came with a disadvantage - it was not possible to load a highly powered load because of the risk of blowback.

    Rimfire technology was used during the Civil War in the Spencer repeating rifle which fired a .52 caliber rimfire bullet. Even though the bullet speed was low, it was capable of inflicting major damage wherever it hit. It also displayed a capacity of firing 20 to 30 shots per minute. This was far superious when compared to other guns used during that time.

    Common Types of Rimfire Ammunition

  • .22 Long Rifle -- this is the most common type
  • .22 Short
  • .17 Hornady Mach 2
  • .17 Hornady Magnum Rifle
  • .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire
  • Pros of Rimfire:

  • Low recoil: this makes rimfire ammo perfect for beginners
  • Cheap: rimfire ammo is easy to manufacture, so it's able to sell for a lower price
  • Cons of Rimfire:

  • Reliability issues: Sometimes the primer compound doesn't make full contact with the           entire rim, so it may fail to fire at times. 
  • Not reloadable: this is because the primer is inside the bottom of the case
  • Small calibers: this is because of its design
  • What Is Centerfire?

    Centerfire

    First off, to keep things simple, centerfire rounds look exactly how they sound. If you can see a circular primer in the middle, at the base of the casing, then it is a centerfire round. Centerfire ammunition always has the primer in the center, hence the name of it. If it doesn't have this, then it is most likely rimfire. 

    Now, for more of a backstory and details on centerfire ammunition.

    Centerfire cartridges were invented close to 1812, much before rimfire cartridges were discovered. However, they were not quite reliable to use and continuous changes were made to its design until it was finally perfected during the year 1855.

    It started gaining a lot of popularity and was used as a standard ignition mechanism for both rifles and handguns by the year 1860. This comprised of a primer cap that was placed at the center of a cartridge. The primer cap was made out of brass or copper.

    It was possible to construct the cartridge and the primer cap using different materials as the primer cap was an external component and could be fit into the cartridge separately. This enabled the makers to construct a stronger cartridge. That could be dispelled with greater velocity and could be used on bullets of all sizes.

    Where Could This Go Wrong?

    An issue that cropped up with using separate metals was sealing. It was very difficult to seal two different metals together so that they could be extremely cohesive. This gave space for moisture and dirt to enter these cartridges and made them difficult to use.

    The solution to this problem was found in the form of lacquer, which was used to seal the different metals tightly and prevent the entry of foreign particles inside the cartridge, which could compromise the ammunition. The result was a highly developed and effective ignition mechanism that was safe to use and could fire at a long range.

    Pros of Centerfire Ammo:

  • Perfect for long range hunting
  • Highly reliable and accurate: makes centerfire ammo perfect for self-defense
  • Made in just about any caliber size: allows you to use it with just about any gun
  • Reloadable
  • Higher bullet power and speed
  • Cons of Centerfire Ammo:

  • Higher priced than rimfire
  • Higher recoil
  • Rimfire VS Centerfire - Difference Between The Two

    We have already taken a look at rimfire and centerfire cartridges and their mechanisms, along with their construction aspects and invention history. This has shed light on the fact that both of these cartridges are not the same and come with some differences, which are spotted in their design and operating mechanisms.

    A rimfire cartridge has a lower power, and thus can operate well at a closer range. Though modern technology has enabled the use of different metals and alloys in their construction to make way for a longer range, the cost factor shoots up and they are not as effective as centerfire cartridges.

    Centerfire cartridges can be reused multiple times by replacing the primer cap. This factor increases the cost of these cartridges, but one can avail the economies of scale in the long run. A rimfire cartridge, on the other hand, is inexpensive but cannot be reused, which makes it an expensive affair if you use it regularly.

    Rimfire cartridges are available in .22 caliber shots whereas centerfire cartridges are available in almost every caliber size. This has made it a favorite with the police forces and the military who use ammunition and are constantly in need of better weapons and equipment.

    Centerfire cartridges are also extremely safe to use. A shot with a higher caliber too is not as dangerous as it would be while using a rimfire cartridge. The primer pipes are completely sealed and are impervious to moisture and dust particles.

    The Working Mechanism

    The working mechanisms of rimfire and centerfire cartridges are different and it is essential to know them as they will help you pick the best cartridge which is suited to your needs.

    Centerfire cartridges have a separate primer cap which is attached to the center of the rim pipe. This enables an even ignition when compared to the rimfire cartridge in which only a part of the gunpowder is ignited despite it being evenly distributed throughout the rim pipe.

    The self-contained primer also makes centerfire cartridges more reliable and easier to shoot even while using high caliber models. Hence, these cartridges are more suitable for military use and for self-defense.

    A rimfire cartridge is more suited for hunting and practice purposes because the primer casing is built into the cartridge, which makes it more susceptible to manufacturing defects. At the same time, a shot fired using a rimfire cartridge is more accurate as it generates lesser recoil when compared to a centerfire cartridge.

    Comparison Table

    Product Name

    Image

    Details

    Rimfi​re

    Rimfire
    • Cartridge has a lower power
    • Can operate well at a closer range
    • Centerfire cartridges are also extremely safe to use

    Centerfire

    Centerfire
    • Cartridges can be reused multiple times
    • Rimfire cartridges are available in .22 caliber shots
    • Cartridges are available in almost every caliber size

    Which Is Better?

    The general firing mechanism of a gun is based on the ignition of the primer. The explosion caused by igniting the primer will propel a bullet forward and help it to reach its target. This happens every time a gun is fired regardless of whether it is a rimfire cartridge or a centerfire cartridge.

    When a centerfire cartridge is used, the explosion takes place at the center since that is where the primer is placed. This leads to a greater degree of efficiency and consistency and the bullet is fired with a greater velocity.

    While rimfire cartridges are best suited for hunting game and close range targets, it is difficult to lay your hands on one because of their limited availability. They are also prone to manufacturing problems which may lead to misfires and accidents. Thus, it is not advisable to use them for self-defense.

    A centerfire cartridge is widely available. While a rimfire cartridge is popular in the .22 caliber rifle, the centerfire cartridge is available in almost every other caliber size. It is very safe to use and is hence in great demand in police forces and military.

    Centerfire cartridges can also be used for a number of times, which raises the bar for other cartridges. Multiple uses of a single cartridge help to even out the expense of buying a centerfire cartridge. which makes it a profitable investment in addition to being highly safe and effective.

    Rimfire vs Centerfire: Our Final Thoughts

    While comparing both types of ammunition, it is quite easy to say that centerfire cartridges are safer and more reliable when compared to rimfire cartridges. They are designed superiorly and are widely available today due to their use in almost every rifle and handgun available to us.

    As we compare the differences, it is imperative to note that rimfire cartridges are on a decline whereas centerfire cartridges are the future. The use of a primer cap instead of a compound make centerfire cartridges more reliable and safe to use and the boxer design makes it very easy to extract a used primer and replace it with a new one.

    While the reloading feature is available in rimfire cartridges too, it can be done only by using a specialized kit designed for this purpose. At the same time, the procedure is complex and needs delicate handling which makes it time-consuming and not worth all the effort.


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    6.5 Creedmoor VS 308s: Ammo Comparisons And Review

    6.5 Creedmoor VS 308s

    If you are an ammunition enthusiast and keep reading about the various types of bullets and cartridges, you’ll be familiar with the ever going debate on which of the long-range rounds is better, the 6.5 Creedmoor or the .308 Winchester (or 208, as it is called). Some have also hailed the 6.5 Creedmoor as the new 308, considering the time of their respective launches and the performance.

    6.5 Creedmoor has gained immense popularity amongst the medium to long range target shooters, between 500 to 1000 yards. Both ammo, while having a similar base, differ quite well in their performance, mainly ballistic and recoil.

    Ahead, we’ll compare the 6.5 Creedmoor against the .308 Winchester and see whether it really is the upgrade you were looking for. Before that, let’s take a quick overview of both the ammo.

    308 Winchester: Overview

    308 winchester

    Launched in 1952, .308 has long been the preferred short-action ammo for target shooters and hunters. It is a rimless cartridge and was used to derive the 7.62x51mm NATO rifle, commercially. Therefore, it has been used by civilians as well as military agents alike.

    Due to its short case, the .308 Winchester became very popular with and suitable for the short action rifles.  If loaded with an expanding bullet, the round tears into the target and therefore, the 308s are ideally extensively used for hunting large targets as well, like a black bear, whitetail deer or even an elk. The 308 load has more drop at longer ranges, resulting in lower muzzle velocity.

    6.5 Creedmoor: Overview

    creedmoor

    The 6.5 Creedmoor is a newer launch, having released in 2007. However, it has taken over a lot of market share due to its high ballistic performance and lower recoil than other rounds. It is a centerfire rifle cartridge, with a length of 2.825 which can accommodate short-action bolt rifles as well as AR-10 semi-automatic ones.

    The 6.5 Creedmoor was designed for long-range target shooting and can deliver as further and beyond as 1,200 yards. It has also taken over the .308 Winchester in terms of being highly accurate in its aim. It also has a lesser recoil, making it a preferred choice over other long-range rounds among target shooters since lesser recoil means faster re-aiming.

    6.5 Creedmoor VS 308 Winchester

    6.5 Creedmoor VS 308

    6.5 Creedmoor is hailed as the upgraded version of the 308 Winchester, one that offers a lot more in the same domains. Even the parent cartridge of 6.5 Creedmoor was derived from the 308. 

    Let’s compare both these rounds in terms of their performance, availability, price and ballistics, and see which one comes out looking better.

    Ballistics Performance

    The 6.5 Creedmoor is sleeker and longer, making it ergonomically more aerodynamic. It can shoot as further as 1,000-1,200 yards, while the 308 is bounded to approximately 500 yards.

    The 6.5 Creedmoor propellants weigh 120 grains whose muzzle velocity after 500 yards is 2,078 feet per second, which is brilliant for long-range target shooting. The 308 uses bullets in the 150 grains weight range and the muzzle velocity drops to 1,963 feet per second after 500 yards.

    The difference between the two can be a huge deciding factor when it comes to precision shooting. They both start at a similar velocity, with 6.5 CM firing at 3,010 feet per second and the .308 Winchester firing at 3000 feet per second, but the .308 considerably slows down to the projectile weight and structure. The longer and thinner bullets of 6.5 CM allow it to keep its fast velocity stable over long distances.

    Cartridge Case

    6.5 Creedmoor has a substantially shorter case than the 308 Winchester. The case for 6.5 CM is derived from its parent cartridge, the .30 TC. The shorter case means a longer bullet, which is why it performs better in terms of ballistics.

    6.5 cartridge

    There is a difference in the sharpness of the shoulders of the two as well, which is why the recoil varies. The 6.5 Creedmoor has a 30 degrees shoulder angle as opposed to the 20 degrees of .308, making it sharper. The length of the shell casing of 6.5 CM bullet is 48.8mm.

    When used for longer periods, there is another difference that comes to light that brass in 6.5 Creedmoor lasts longer than the .308 Winchester, making it more durable.

    Available Ammo

    The bullets for the .308 Winchester weight about 150 grains, while those for 6.5 Creedmoor weigh 30 grains lighter at 120 grains. There is a huge variety available for both. The cost does not differ much, with the ammo for both at similar price levels.

    The bullet selection for .308 Winchester is essentially more than the 6.5 Creedmoor since it has been there for about 60 years, but the performance of the projectiles used by the latter is a lot better, having better ballistic caliber and more speed. They have a lower drop. The 6.5 Creedmoor bullets also have a better density which results in higher penetration into the target. For the 6.5 Creedmoor, a bullet weighing 140 grains has a higher caliber of .526 and a velocity of 2710 feet per second, which is more than what .308 has to offer.

    Some bullets available for the 6.5 Creedmoor are Hornady ELD Match 120 grains, 147 grains; Nosler Match Grade Custom Bullet Tip 140gr; Nosler Ballistic Tip 140gr, etc.

    The .308 Winchester uses Federal Fusion Ammo 165 grains, Fiocchi Barnes TTSX Load 168 grains, Federal Premium Vital-Shok 165 grains, and a whole lot more choices.

    With most brands, the ammo for the .308 Winchester is cheaper and more readily available than the 6.5 Creedmoor.

    Recoil And Lifespan

    The 6.5 Creedmoor definitely sees a lesser recoil due to the lighter weight of the bullets used. This makes the shooting considerably easier and takes lesser time in reacquiring the target, which is why it is preferred by the target-shooter and becoming more popular with the hunters as well.

    The barrel lifespan is more for the .308 Winchester. Due to a smaller bore of the 6.5 CM and the fact that it has a higher firing velocity, the barrel life is a little shorter than its rival.

    308 barrel

    Rifles Available

    As with the ammo, the rifles for 6.5 Creedmoor are not very easily available due to its recency in the launch. On the other hand, there is a huge availability of all short-action rifles style you’d want for the .308 Winchester. For example, if you take Savage rifles, they have about 10 models suitable for the 6.5 CM while a whopping 36 for the .308 Winchester.

    Also, the 6.5 Creedmoor being a dominantly long-range round, the rifles available are a little difficult to find because they are all precision, high-quality rifles, which cost more and have a specific use. Still, in the current market, the precision rifles for the .308 are a lot more easy and widely available than for the 6.5 CM.

    There are some precision rifles that do are apt for both cartridges, for instance, the Ruger Precision Rifle. It is also a beginners rifle for long-range shooting, so the fact that it caters to 6.5 Creedmoor should really punch up its popularity further.

    Pricing

    There isn’t a lot of difference between the pricing of 6.5 Creedmoor and the 308s. However, on an average, a round of 308s will cost about 10 cents less than a round of 6.5 Creedmoor.

    For example, with the Federal Premium Gold Medal Berger, a round of .308 Winchester costs $1.47 while a round of 6.5 Creedmoor costs $1.57. On the other hand, the Hornady American Whitetail ammo costs the same for both, priced at $1.07/round. However, the 6.5 Creedmoor is made by Hornady, therefore, any ammunition that comes from the brand is bound to be cheaper for the CM.

    PRODUCT

    IMAGE

    RATING

    PRICE

    308 Winchester

    308 winchester

    6.5 Creedmoor

    creedmoor

    The Conclusion

    The main difference between the 308s and the 6.5 Creedmoor lies in the range delivered and the precision. The 6.5 Creedmoor has a longer range and better accuracy, in short, a better ballistic performance. For long-range target shooter, the high velocity due to the aerodynamic build of the cartridge does a better job.

    The .308 Winchester is, however, more deadly when it comes to tearing the target down and has a longer barrel life. The ammo is widely and more readily available and there is a wider selection of rifles built for it. The bullet is more deadly and does more damage as well due to wider diameter. It falls short when it comes to long-range shooting when compared with the 6.5 Creedmoor due to heavier bullets and the structure.

    If you are looking for a round to target anywhere within 500 yards and have a restricting budget, .308 Winchester should be your go-to choice.

    For anyone looking at precision shooting at a range longer than 500 yards, 6.5 Creedmoor is a clear choice. It is definitely a little more expensive considering it’s still in its nascent stage of popularity, but the accuracy and the performance offered surpasses the long-standing reliability of .308 Winchester.

    9mm VS 45: What Is The Difference Between The Two?

    9mm vs 45 Ammo Comparisons


    Choosing your gun is amongst one of the most crucial decisions you make in your life. Usually, depending upon the intended purpose of the weapon, common considerations that guide a gun buying decision include its size, shooting range, ease of firing, sound produced on firing, weight and the cost. For instance, if you need the gun for your safety and protection at home, then you might be okay with a big gun like a shotgun or a rifle as long as it comfortable to fire. If you intend to carry the firearm on your person then you would want it to be compact and easy to conceal.

    However, another important factor that can influence your decision is the kind of cartridge the gun uses and what will you need. There are many different kinds of ammo. So many that a first-time buyer can get thoroughly confused. For the sake of dialing down the confusion, we are only going to pitt a 9mm vs 45 in this article.

    What Is A Cartridge?

    Commonly confused with a bullet, a cartridge or ammo actually has these components:

  • A bullet which is the actual part of the cartridge that impacts the target.
  • A casing which holds the primer and powder and makes the shell of the cartridge.
  • A primer which helps ignite the powder.
  • A powder that explodes.
  • At the bottom of the cartridge is the primer. It is a chemical compound which is struck by the firing pin at the base of the cartridge when the gun’s trigger is pulled. This creates a spark and ignites the powder. The powder catches fire and explodes. This explosion creates a large amount of pressure that throws the bullet out of the cartridge and ultimately out of the barrel of the gun resulting in the weapon firing.

    The empty cartridge needs to be removed from the weapon to make room for the next cartridge to be fired. Some weapons do this automatically while some need to be emptied manually.

    How Does Ammo Differ?

    gun ammo


    If it is your first experience with owning a gun, the sea of options in ammo can make it very difficult to choose the right ammo for you. But there are two broad differences that can help you out.

    The first is whether you want a rimfire or a centerfire ammo. In the centerfire cartridges, you’ll be able to see the primer in the center of the base of the bullet. If the base of the cartridges is flat with no primer in the center, it is a rimfire ammo.

    It just means that firing pin will hit the center in the case of centerfire ammo and it will hit the rim in case of the rimfire ammo. Though, the rimfire bullets are much cheaper, you will usually find them only small caliber.

    This brings us to the second big difference - the size of the ammo. There are many different sizes of cartridges - 9mm, .40 S&W, 45 ACP, 12 Ga, .50 BMG and the list goes on.


    Why Size Matters

    Ammo contributes significantly to the choice of gun you make because of its size. Guns that use larger cartridges have more stopping power - that means a greater impact on the target. At the same time, they are slow to fire continuously because of the higher recoil. Their size may also decrease the magazine capacity, which we will talk about later, and their follow up shots are also limited.

    Guns with smaller cartridges offer the advantage of fast follow up shots and more room for multiple shots. Also, their stopping power is less, which is safer for first time users.

    As promised, let us understand and compare the 9mm and 45 to help you understand which one is the cartridge for you so you can choose the right gun for yourself.


    History

    Both, the 9mm and 45 go back to the beginning of the 20th century.

    Actually named the 9x19 Parabellum, the 9mm was designed by George Luger way back in 1901 and went into production a year later. It was adopted by the German Navy and German Army in the years 1904 and 1906, respectively. It was also used by the German forces in World War 1.

    In the year 1904, John Browning developed the .45, commonly called the 45. Many countries including the United States used it during the World War 1.

    Both cartridges have been popular amongst the worlds’ armed forces since then.

    This is pretty much where the similarities between the two cartridges end. Both are so popular with patrons rooting for them equally that besides a few common factors it is always the 9mm vs 45.

     

    9mm vs 45 man firing a gun

    9mm VS 45: What’s The Difference?

    Let’s get to the why these cartridges are so different.

    Origin

    The 45 was made in the United States of America while the 9mm was made in Germany.

    Diameters

    • Bullet Diameter: The bullet diameter, also known as the caliber, determines the whole it makes in the target. The 9mm as the name suggests has a diameter of 9.01 mm whereas the .45 has a diameter of .452 inches or 11.01 mm. You will often find guns being named in a caliber. That is because of the diameter of the gun’s barrel and hence, of the cartridge.
    • Base Diameter: The 9mm has a base diameter of 9.93 mm, while the 45 has one of 12.1 mm.
    • Neck Diameter: The 9mm has a base diameter of 9.96 mm, while the 45 has one of 12.2 mm.

    Case Type

    There have been no significant findings to prove the effect of casing design on a bullet’s velocity or ballistics. Yet, some manufactures claim that their design makes a difference. In case of the 9mm, you’ll find the casing to be tapered while the 45 has a straight one.

    Case Length

    The case length can affect how far inside a bullet is seated in the cartridge.

    You will find a case length of .898 inches in a 45 and of .754 inches in a 9mm cartridge.

    Expansion

    The 9mm expands .36” to .72” while the 45 expands .45” to .79”.

    Length Of The Cartridge

    A cartridge length should be able to accomodate the following:

    • The neck should be long enough to give the cartridge a comfortable seating and enough hold.
    • The cartridge should not be too big for the gun’s magazine.

    The 9mm ammo is 19.15mm long while the 45 is 32.4mm long.

    Pressure

    The pressure is one of the contributors to how far and how fast the bullet is projected from the cartridge and gun. The 9mm has a maximum pressure of 34,084 psi, while the 45 has maximum pressure of  21,000 psi.

    Velocity

    A high speed cartridge is always better. Hence, with a velocity range of 95-1400 FPS, the 9mm beats the 45 which travels in a range of 700-1150 FPS.

    Energy

    The 9mm carries an energy of 115 grains: 323 foot-pounds which is much lower than the 185 grains: 411 foot pounds of the 45.

    Momentum

    Ballistic experts have maintained that the momentum is a good measure of the bullet’s performance. In that case the 9mm falls short of momentum by a large gap against the 45.

    Primer

    The 45 uses the same primer as large rifles while the 9mm uses the Berdan or Boxer primer for small pistols. The Berdan primer is mostly used by militaries though it is reusable, it is a difficult process as the primer cup is attached to the casing itself. While the boxer primer is most popular is the United States due to its ease of replacement.

    Penetration

    The deeper a bullet penetrates, the more damage it causes to the target. The 45 gives a bullet penetration of 11.3” to 14.3” as compared to the 9mm’s 8” to 15.9” penetration.

    Capacity Of The Magazine

    The 9mm cartridges are smaller than the 45. Hence, magazines can hold more of the 9mm. However, the capacity may vary depending upon which gun is being used. Usually, a magazine shipped from the factory can carry 6-14 cartridges in case of 45s and 6-20 cartridges in case of the 9mms.

    Recoil

    man pointing a gun

    Recoil refers to the force with which a firearm recoils when it is fired without support from behind. It impacts the user and can even cause serious injury. The 9mm cartridge has a lower recoil than the 45 ammo. The latter is known to push the firearm user’s hands backward on firing.

    Cost

    A 9mm cartridge is much cheaper than the 45.

    Happy Choosing

    There you are! Now you know pretty much everything you need to know to choose the right cartridge for you. The 9mm trumps the 45 in aspects such as cost, easy to replace primer, more magazine capacity and lower recoil, the 45 seems to be made to get the job done with its higher penetration, momentum and energy.

    You can now weigh the pros and cons of both the cartridges to decide what works best for you.

     

    Sources:

    Diffen

    Pew Pew Tactical

    Gun Digest

    Hunter Ed

    Mass Reloading

    Beginners Guide To Bullet Sizes And Types

    bullets on a table with different bullet sizes

    There was a time when there were only a couple of types of bullets from which to choose. However, over time, the ammunition industry evolved to manufacture a plethora of types and sizes of bullets. To know what bullet sizes to use, you need to become more familiar with a few things first.

    You need to understand the terminology used when talking about bullets in general. You also need to get familiar with some other details about bullets that will allow you to choose the right one. Furthermore, you also need to know about some of your options.

    Terminology

    The word bullet is often used incorrectly. What you may think of as a bullet is actually a combination of different parts. The case is the outside, cylindrical part. The pointed end is the bullet. This is what will hit your target when you shoot. Inside the case are the gunpowder and the primer. The primer causes the ignition which allows the gunpowder to ignite and pop the bullet out of the case to shoot. The whole thing is called a cartridge, not a bullet.

    It may also help to understand that there are two types of cartridges. You can define them based on the primer. A rimfire type has primer in the rim or the bottom part of the cartridge. It explodes completely, leaving the case unusable. A centerfire type has the primer in the very center of the bottom. It will not ruin the case, so you can reload this type of cartridge.

    Caliber is the size of the inside of your gun barrel. You have to choose bullets that match the caliber or else you will have big problems. The bullet needs to sail smoothly out of the barrel. If it is too small, there is a risk that it won’t move correctly out of the barrel. With a too large caliber, you run the risk of having your gun blow up due to the bullet getting stuck.

    A few more things to know before you start considering the different types of bullets include how the weight and speed are determined and what stopping power means. The weight of the cartridge is measured in grains. One pound is equivalent to 7,000 grains. The exact speed of the bullet is given in feet per second. The stopping power of the bullet is the number of bullets it would take to hit the target and drop it.

    Knowing these terms and understanding the general design of a bullet will help you as you consider your options and allow you to make a better decision.

    Types of Bullets

    Bullets with gun

    While there are a number of bullet types available in the market, we’ll go over the ones that are the most commonly used in hunting, self-defense, and target practice.

    Hollow point

    Considered among the more dangerous options, hollow point bullets are structured to expand on collision with the target. They are mostly used for home defense and by the armed forces and law enforcement due to their intense stopping power. While considered dangerous, they are the best in case of an attack since their high stopping power ensures maximum damage with every subsequent bullet and restricts the attacker.

    Full metal jacket

    Full metal jacket, or FMJ as they are called, are the most common type of bullets, mainly used in shooting ranges with short distances. The bullet is made of a soft metal, such as lead, which is covered by hard metal, such as copper. The presence of an outer metal covering ensures that the lead is not left in the barrel after firing the bullet. These bullets come in all kinds of shapes, including pointy, round, and flat. FMJ bullets are not very suitable for self-defense or attacks due to the low stopping power. They cut small channels as they go through the target.

    Open tip matches

    OTMs have a very small opening on the top, which makes them quite similar to hollow point bullets; however, they can’t expand due to the opening. This type of bullet is preferred mainly by long-distance target shooters since they are manufactured in a way that the bullets are standardized when it comes to their roundness. The consistency enables their suitability for shooting long-range targets.

    Ballistic tip

    Ballistic tip is the combination of full metal jacket and hollow point bullet types. It takes the stopping power of the hollow point and the physical structure of FMJ to create a bullet that is long with a boat-tail base and has a plastic covering. Ballistic tip bullets are pointy with consistent and sleek bottoms. The tip is made of plastic which enables it to keep the shape intact. These types of bullets are mainly used in hunting due to the high stopping power. The weight is mostly collected in the back of the bullet to give it more speed.

    Soft point

    Designed to expand on hitting the target, soft point bullets are made of a soft metal, such as lead, at their core and have a covering of a strong, hard metal. The front tip is left open with some of the lead exposed so that the soft metal can easily expand on hitting the target. Therefore, soft point bullets are quite similar to the full metal jacket bullets. They can cause some serious wounds due to expanding from the original caliber size. They are available in both boat-tails and normal cylindrical ends.

    Bird shot

    As the name suggests, these are small cartridges used for hunting birds, primarily. These are available as shotgun rounds and come in multiple quantities, more than a dozen, in one cartridge. They spray out when shot. Bird shots are used only as shotgun rounds and for shooting birds and pigeons but never for attack or self-defense.

    Common Bullet Sizes

    It’s quite natural for a novice to get confused when it comes to buying ammunition. There are so many sizes of bullets available on the market today that it can be tough to select the one that fits best with your needs. The most common use is hunting, self-defense, or targeting shooting, so we’ll cover the bullet sizes that mostly cater to these objectives.

    Do keep in mind that apart from the ones listed here, there are many other bullet sizes you’ll find when you go for ammunition shopping. Other common options include .380ACP, .45ACP, and 12 gauge. There are some less popular ones as well, such as .357 Magnum, which is used in revolvers and more expensive than the rest, priced at about $0.80 each. With that in mind, though, let’s look at the top options.

    Bullet Sizes

    .22LR

    The .22LR is the most commonly sold bullet due to a variety of factors. The .22 long rifle is the starter caliber for shooters. It’s used to hunt snakes, birds, etc. Here are some specific features of the bullet:

    • The bullet weighs about 30-40 grains
    • Negligible recoil makes a great caliber for people who are just beginning to shoot
    • It’s a rimfire
    • Priced at around $0.07 a round makes it extremely cheap
    • High speed and intense shooting power with small size
    • Apt for shooting ranges and hunting or training
    • Bullet velocity of approximately 1200-1600 feet/sec

    The .22LR is the best option for beginners due to its cheap price and minimum hassles of handling. While it is meant for shooting birds, snakes, and targets, it can cause serious wounds if shot at a human since it keeps moving inside the body and damages the internal organs.

    .25ACP

    .25 ACP, the automatic Colt pistol, is an upgraded version of .22LR. Being a little larger, it has a slightly higher stopping power. It’s a centerfire caliber and considered more reliable due to the centerfire covering. Let’s see some of the features of .25ACP:

    • Slightly larger than .22LR but still compact
    • High stopping power
    • Centerfire caliber straight-walled
    • Used for short ranges with low velocity
    • Reliable due to the centerfire casings
    • More expensive, priced at around $0.20 a bullet

    The .25ACP is meant to be used in handguns for home security since they can cause more damage due to higher stopping power and the reliable centerfire design.

    9mm Luger

    The 9mm Luger, or the 9x19mm Parabellum, as it’s technically named, is basically an all-rounder bullet that can be used in self-defense as well as for recreational shooting. The shooting power depends on the type of gun used. However, they do have a very low recoil which makes them more popular.

    Here’s what you get when you purchase the 9mm Luger:

    • Bullet weight between 115 and 147 grains
    • Big bullet size, similar to .380ACP
    • The standard caliber used in NATO nations and by most of the police officers universally
    • Can be used with multiple guns
    • Priced at around $0.25 each.

    The 9mm Luger can also be used in concealed guns. The size makes it very versatile.

    .56×45 mm

    Also called as the .223, the .56x45mm is used both by the armed forces as well as by civilians. The caliber is good to use for long-range, which makes it popular as a home defense round among civilians.

    Here’s what you need to know about the .56x45mm:

    • Has a slight recoil
    • Bullets weigh around 55 grains
    • Used in some specific rifles, such as M16/M4
    • The cartridge has a long-range accuracy
    • Not used in hunting

    Priced at about $0.30 each, the .223 caliber is not very popular since you can’t use it for hunting, but nevertheless, it packs power and is widely used in self-defense.

    .40 S&W

    Manufactured for the FBI initially as a 10mm caliber, the .40 S&W has been heavily popular with defense and law enforcement agencies. It has more stopping power than other handgun cartridges used and also costs less.

    Here’s what you should know about .40 S&W before choosing to buy it:

    • Bullet weight between 165 to 180 grains, making it lightweight and preferred for quick handling
    • Packs more stopping power than the 9mm
    • Costs less with bullets priced at about $0.30
    • Also used for self-defense
    • Strong recoil

    While the FBI has shifted back to use the 9mm cartridge mostly, the .40 S&W is more suitable and is still used by many law enforcement agencies due to more power and energy.

    Wrap Up of Bullet Sizes

    More options mean more confusion. This is often the case when it comes to bullet sizes. It can be overwhelming to buy the right caliber considering there are myriad sizes available in the market. Wrong bullet size and type with respect to the gun you possess can severely backfire, literally.

    There are a lot of factors that need to be considered before purchasing the bullet, along with understanding a lot of technical terms. What we have covered should give you a solid start as you begin to explore your ammunition options.