Rimfire VS Centerfire: Ammo Comparisons – Max Blagg

Rimfire vs Centerfire

There isn’t a lot of difference on how guns work. The major difference lies in the type of primer ignition system used in the gun which leaves beginners in a fix as they constantly wonder about the better primer ignition option between rimfire vs. centerfire.

The functioning mechanism of guns is designed on the same concept. A powder charge is filled in a pipe that is sealed from one end. Ignition in the powder charge stimulates an explosion where a projectile is launched from the sealed end of the pipe.

The question of choosing one ignition mechanism over the other depends on the purpose for which a gun is going to be used. These activities include using a gun for hunting or simply learning to shoot at a shooting class.

Modern bullets use one of the two primer ignition systems - rimfire or centerfire where each mechanism has its own purpose and uses. The major difference between these two ignition mechanisms is their design and method of operation.

We will be exploring the details of rimfire vs centerfire in this article and help you understand the niches in which they operate along with their working mechanisms and differences.

Parts of a Cartridge: Both Rimfire and Centerfire

Every cartridge, or "round" in other words, has four parts to it: 

  • Bullet (not the entire cartridge, just the projectile)
  • Propellant
  • Primer
  • Case
  • It doesn't matter if the cartridge is centerfire ammunition or rimfire ammunition, these four components exist in every single cartridge. Generally, all bullets work the same way. The firing pin hits the primer, and that creates a very small explosion.

    The small explosion that it creates will set off the gunpowder, and that forces the bullet to shoot forward, out of the gun through the barrel.

    So, where exactly is the difference between centerfire vs rimfire ammunition? That lies within where the primer is located.

    What Is Rimfire?

    Rimfire

    A rimfire cartridge was first used in the year 1845 and was made by evenly distributing the primer inside the rim pipe. It worked wonders as the cartridge was one-piece and did not require any assembly before firing. The single piece structure also helped to prevent the entry of dirt, dust and moisture inside the cartridge and made it very convenient to use.

    Rimfire design faced two major challenges during the initial period. The first was to distribute the primer evenly at the base of the cartridge. Then, the second was the need to utilize a soft metal for the construction of the rim.

    The rim was needed to be created out of a highly malleable metal so that it could be dented easily by the firing pin. Copper was the most preferred choice but it came with a disadvantage - it was not possible to load a highly powered load because of the risk of blowback.

    Rimfire technology was used during the Civil War in the Spencer repeating rifle which fired a .52 caliber rimfire bullet. Even though the bullet speed was low, it was capable of inflicting major damage wherever it hit. It also displayed a capacity of firing 20 to 30 shots per minute. This was far superious when compared to other guns used during that time.

    Common Types of Rimfire Ammunition

  • .22 Long Rifle -- this is the most common type
  • .22 Short
  • .17 Hornady Mach 2
  • .17 Hornady Magnum Rifle
  • .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire
  • Pros of Rimfire:

  • Low recoil: this makes rimfire ammo perfect for beginners
  • Cheap: rimfire ammo is easy to manufacture, so it's able to sell for a lower price
  • Cons of Rimfire:

  • Reliability issues: Sometimes the primer compound doesn't make full contact with the           entire rim, so it may fail to fire at times. 
  • Not reloadable: this is because the primer is inside the bottom of the case
  • Small calibers: this is because of its design
  • What Is Centerfire?

    Centerfire

    First off, to keep things simple, centerfire rounds look exactly how they sound. If you can see a circular primer in the middle, at the base of the casing, then it is a centerfire round. Centerfire ammunition always has the primer in the center, hence the name of it. If it doesn't have this, then it is most likely rimfire. 

    Now, for more of a backstory and details on centerfire ammunition.

    Centerfire cartridges were invented close to 1812, much before rimfire cartridges were discovered. However, they were not quite reliable to use and continuous changes were made to its design until it was finally perfected during the year 1855.

    It started gaining a lot of popularity and was used as a standard ignition mechanism for both rifles and handguns by the year 1860. This comprised of a primer cap that was placed at the center of a cartridge. The primer cap was made out of brass or copper.

    It was possible to construct the cartridge and the primer cap using different materials as the primer cap was an external component and could be fit into the cartridge separately. This enabled the makers to construct a stronger cartridge. That could be dispelled with greater velocity and could be used on bullets of all sizes.

    Where Could This Go Wrong?

    An issue that cropped up with using separate metals was sealing. It was very difficult to seal two different metals together so that they could be extremely cohesive. This gave space for moisture and dirt to enter these cartridges and made them difficult to use.

    The solution to this problem was found in the form of lacquer, which was used to seal the different metals tightly and prevent the entry of foreign particles inside the cartridge, which could compromise the ammunition. The result was a highly developed and effective ignition mechanism that was safe to use and could fire at a long range.

    Pros of Centerfire Ammo:

  • Perfect for long range hunting
  • Highly reliable and accurate: makes centerfire ammo perfect for self-defense
  • Made in just about any caliber size: allows you to use it with just about any gun
  • Reloadable
  • Higher bullet power and speed
  • Cons of Centerfire Ammo:

  • Higher priced than rimfire
  • Higher recoil
  • Rimfire VS Centerfire - Difference Between The Two

    We have already taken a look at rimfire and centerfire cartridges and their mechanisms, along with their construction aspects and invention history. This has shed light on the fact that both of these cartridges are not the same and come with some differences, which are spotted in their design and operating mechanisms.

    A rimfire cartridge has a lower power, and thus can operate well at a closer range. Though modern technology has enabled the use of different metals and alloys in their construction to make way for a longer range, the cost factor shoots up and they are not as effective as centerfire cartridges.

    Centerfire cartridges can be reused multiple times by replacing the primer cap. This factor increases the cost of these cartridges, but one can avail the economies of scale in the long run. A rimfire cartridge, on the other hand, is inexpensive but cannot be reused, which makes it an expensive affair if you use it regularly.

    Rimfire cartridges are available in .22 caliber shots whereas centerfire cartridges are available in almost every caliber size. This has made it a favorite with the police forces and the military who use ammunition and are constantly in need of better weapons and equipment.

    Centerfire cartridges are also extremely safe to use. A shot with a higher caliber too is not as dangerous as it would be while using a rimfire cartridge. The primer pipes are completely sealed and are impervious to moisture and dust particles.

    The Working Mechanism

    The working mechanisms of rimfire and centerfire cartridges are different and it is essential to know them as they will help you pick the best cartridge which is suited to your needs.

    Centerfire cartridges have a separate primer cap which is attached to the center of the rim pipe. This enables an even ignition when compared to the rimfire cartridge in which only a part of the gunpowder is ignited despite it being evenly distributed throughout the rim pipe.

    The self-contained primer also makes centerfire cartridges more reliable and easier to shoot even while using high caliber models. Hence, these cartridges are more suitable for military use and for self-defense.

    A rimfire cartridge is more suited for hunting and practice purposes because the primer casing is built into the cartridge, which makes it more susceptible to manufacturing defects. At the same time, a shot fired using a rimfire cartridge is more accurate as it generates lesser recoil when compared to a centerfire cartridge.

    Comparison Table

    Product Name

    Image

    Details

    Rimfi​re

    Rimfire
    • Cartridge has a lower power
    • Can operate well at a closer range
    • Centerfire cartridges are also extremely safe to use

    Centerfire

    Centerfire
    • Cartridges can be reused multiple times
    • Rimfire cartridges are available in .22 caliber shots
    • Cartridges are available in almost every caliber size

    Which Is Better?

    The general firing mechanism of a gun is based on the ignition of the primer. The explosion caused by igniting the primer will propel a bullet forward and help it to reach its target. This happens every time a gun is fired regardless of whether it is a rimfire cartridge or a centerfire cartridge.

    When a centerfire cartridge is used, the explosion takes place at the center since that is where the primer is placed. This leads to a greater degree of efficiency and consistency and the bullet is fired with a greater velocity.

    While rimfire cartridges are best suited for hunting game and close range targets, it is difficult to lay your hands on one because of their limited availability. They are also prone to manufacturing problems which may lead to misfires and accidents. Thus, it is not advisable to use them for self-defense.

    A centerfire cartridge is widely available. While a rimfire cartridge is popular in the .22 caliber rifle, the centerfire cartridge is available in almost every other caliber size. It is very safe to use and is hence in great demand in police forces and military.

    Centerfire cartridges can also be used for a number of times, which raises the bar for other cartridges. Multiple uses of a single cartridge help to even out the expense of buying a centerfire cartridge. which makes it a profitable investment in addition to being highly safe and effective.

    Rimfire vs Centerfire: Our Final Thoughts

    While comparing both types of ammunition, it is quite easy to say that centerfire cartridges are safer and more reliable when compared to rimfire cartridges. They are designed superiorly and are widely available today due to their use in almost every rifle and handgun available to us.

    As we compare the differences, it is imperative to note that rimfire cartridges are on a decline whereas centerfire cartridges are the future. The use of a primer cap instead of a compound make centerfire cartridges more reliable and safe to use and the boxer design makes it very easy to extract a used primer and replace it with a new one.

    While the reloading feature is available in rimfire cartridges too, it can be done only by using a specialized kit designed for this purpose. At the same time, the procedure is complex and needs delicate handling which makes it time-consuming and not worth all the effort.


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    Ear Protection For Shooting: 5 Methods – Max Blagg

    Ear Protection While Shooting

    Having a good sense of hearing is imperative in life as, without sound, we would not be able to carry out tasks effectively on a day to day basis. Ear protection for shooting is extremely important because guns create a high decibel sound when fired which may lead to hearing loss in the long run.

    It is not possible to reverse the effects of hearing loss once they set in because it is permanent. Therefore, it is very important to take care of your ears while you are out for a hunt or during the course of regular shooting practice.

    There are a lot of factors to be considered when it comes to choosing the right protective gear for your ears while you go out for hunting as a shooter is exposed to the sound of pistols and big-bore rifles which can create a noise higher than 175 dB.

    In this article, we will take you through the various causes by which guns can affect your hearing along with the need to protect your ears and using the right gear to prevent hearing loss.

    Guns And Hearing Loss

    woman practicing to shoot

    The sound is measured with the help of a unit termed as decibel (dB). The higher the decibel, greater is the amount of noise generated. While a conversation between two or more people can generate a sound of about 60 dB, the sound created by guns of different types can vary between the range of 156 - 160 dB which is even greater than that of a jet plane taking off!

    People who use guns regularly are more prone to suffer from hearing loss and other hearing-related issues such as tinnitus. Even the reverberation caused by a gunshot is capable of causing hearing loss to the shooter as well as to the bystanders.

    Many guns come loaded with a recoil compensator and other add-ons. These accessories create an even greater sound and cause more damage to the ears. Typically, the ear which is closer to the muzzle experiences more damage than the other ear since it is not protected by the head shadow.

    Research has proved that a prolonged exposure to noise levels above 85 dB can cause a permanent hearing damage which is also known as a noise-induced hearing loss. Our ears are equipped with fine hairs that are responsible for stimulating the auditory nerve fibers. High sound levels destroy these fine hairs leading to hearing loss and associated damage.

    Problems Associated With Hearing Loss

    man's ear

    There are various problems associated with not being able to hear well. If you are a hunter, then a hearing loss will lead to problems during hunting and you may not be able to concentrate well on your target due to noise issues and lose the game.

    People with a noise-induced hearing loss find it difficult to listen to high-frequency sounds which makes communicating and socializing with people more difficult and challenging. Such people face more problems while communicating with women and children as their sounds fall in the high-frequency range.

    The second problem associated with hearing loss is tinnitus. We have all experienced a whooshing or buzzing sound in one or both of our ears for a few seconds sometime during over lives. Imagine how frustrating it would be if that sound never went away! Tinnitus is exactly what we are referring to and the sounds could be low or high pitched.

    Hearing loss is irreparable and irreversible once it sets in. Thus, it is very important to take the help of appropriate protective gear that would help to keep your ears from harm and provide adequate noise control.

    Need For Protecting Your Ears

    We have already covered the part on how you could suffer from a noise-induced hearing loss and other associated risks if you stay exposed to high levels of noise. It has been noted that only 50% of people who go out for shooting and hunting actually use the protective gear designed to protect their ears.

    Repeated and continuous use of firearms is capable of inducing a permanent hearing loss over the course of time. Noise levels of 140 dB and above are extremely harmful to the human ear and therefore it is necessary to care for your ears while you are out hunting.

    If you are target practicing indoors, the damage is even greater as sound has the capability of ricocheting among the walls and resonating for a long time when compared to outdoor shooting. Large rifles can produce a sound that is approximately 25% more than that of the other guns.

    Professional shooters stand the risk of losing some part of their hearing capabilities in the long run despite using protective gear if it is not worn correctly. At the same time, one ear may face greater damage than the other based on its proximity to the muzzle.

    Types Of Noise Reduction Devices

    Loud noises are harmful to our ears and can cause hearing loss if we stay exposed to such high decibels for a long period of time. In order to prevent that from happening, we must take good care of our ears while shooting.

    There are many types of protective gear available in the market today that help in reducing the background noise and provide good protection for your ears. These include gear like earmuffs, analog and electronic earplugs.

    The most common form of hearing protection used in everyday life is the passive hearing protection system. These comprise of soft earplugs that can be fit in the ear and block external noise from the surroundings. Since they just block noise by occupying the physical space in the ear, they are not great for providing protection for an extended use.

    Earmuffs, on the other hand, are a better option when compared to earplugs because they help in eliminating the background sound effectively. The best type of protective gear for ears are noise-canceling electronic earplugs and earmuffs. They help to reduce the noise level with the help of electronic technology and does not cause any damage to the ears.

    At the same time, these electronic earplugs enable a person to listen to what is happening in their surroundings. It blocks the high decibel noise and lets one hear general sounds like a conversation and the sound of people approaching.

    Ways To Protect Your Ears

    Some guns are capable of producing a lot of pressure when fired. This pressure can cause hearing loss by damaging the bones present behind the ear. This can happen even if the ear canal is protected by an earplug. Hence it is essential to recognize and choose a high-quality gear that will protect your ears even in an indoor setting.

    These are the simplest and cheapest way to protect your ears. They have a noise reduction rating of 25 to 33 depending on their type and are capable of providing good protection to your ears.

    While they are inexpensive and small, they also provide limited protection since they just cover the ear canal. This leaves the bones outside the ear canal vulnerable to damage from loud noises and can cause a damage to your hearing despite the protection.

    These earplugs also block out all the sounds from the environment which will leave you lost and incapable of paying attention to what is happening around you. This is a major drawback especially when you are out hunting.

    These are a modified version of the normal earplugs since they are reversible. The reversible feature allows passive protection for continuous noise and a noise-activated protection for a momentary sound like the shot of a gun.

    The best part about using these earplugs is that they allow the user to listen to the sounds from the surrounding when the noise-activated protection mode is being used. This is a very big advantage for hunters who need to keep a tab on any unusual movement in their surroundings.

    ClearArmor 141001 Shooters Hearing Protection Safety Ear Muffs...
    • SonicSeal - ClearArmor's exclusive sound technology provides better protection to save your hearing.
    • Comfortable, premium quality, lightweight, super soft ear ring foam for maximum long wear comfort.
    • Padded head band adjusts to fit most head sizes . . . Industrial grade. . . Engineered to last

    Earmuffs are a better choice than earplugs for people who use guns regularly. They have a noise reduction rating of about 30 and provide an effective protection to users. They are simple to use and do not require any additional assembly.

    They also help to protect the delicate bones close to the eardrum and thus help in providing a complete protection to the ears. However, they are awkward to wear with the headgear and may get in the way.

    Howard Leight by Honeywell Impact Sport Sound Amplification Electronic...
    • Built-in directional microphones amplify range commands and other ambient sounds to a safe 82 dB, providing more natural...
    • Actively listens and automatically shuts off amplification when ambient sound reaches 82 dB; Noise Reduction Rating...
    • Features low profile earcups for firearm stock clearance; adjustable headband for secure fit; compact folding design for...

    These are an excellent option for blocking loud noises and amplifying other sounds present in the environment which enables a user to have a clear focus while shooting. They can be used both while hunting and during simple target practice.

    The drawbacks are the same as that of simple earmuffs in terms of a good fit and usability. They also have a noise reduction rating of 22 which make them redundant for use while they are used indoors.

    Otto NoizeBarrier High Definition Electronic Earplugs
    • Up to 40 dB of impulse noise protection Up to 15 dB adaptive noise attenuation Hearing enhancement mode - amplifies soft...

    These earplugs offer the same protection as that which is provided by electronic earmuffs albeit in a smaller size! Some models also give the user the freedom to adjust the sounds in the environment and amplify specific sounds.

    The biggest drawback of these earplugs is that they only protect the ear canal and not the bones that surround it. Thus they are more suitable to hunters than shooters. At the same time, they are expensive and not many hunters may want to buy them.

    Comparison Table

    Firing Up

    We have already explored the need for using protective gear for ears while you are out hunting or shooting using guns. Technology has made it possible to have some great innovations in this field which ranges from all levels of costing and features. Paying adequate attention towards protecting your ears is a must if you wish to safeguard yourself from the danger of hearing loss and other hazards.

    Sources:

    6.5 Creedmoor VS 308s: Ammo Comparisons And Review

    6.5 Creedmoor VS 308s

    If you are an ammunition enthusiast and keep reading about the various types of bullets and cartridges, you’ll be familiar with the ever going debate on which of the long-range rounds is better, the 6.5 Creedmoor or the .308 Winchester (or 208, as it is called). Some have also hailed the 6.5 Creedmoor as the new 308, considering the time of their respective launches and the performance.

    6.5 Creedmoor has gained immense popularity amongst the medium to long range target shooters, between 500 to 1000 yards. Both ammo, while having a similar base, differ quite well in their performance, mainly ballistic and recoil.

    Ahead, we’ll compare the 6.5 Creedmoor against the .308 Winchester and see whether it really is the upgrade you were looking for. Before that, let’s take a quick overview of both the ammo.

    308 Winchester: Overview

    308 winchester

    Launched in 1952, .308 has long been the preferred short-action ammo for target shooters and hunters. It is a rimless cartridge and was used to derive the 7.62x51mm NATO rifle, commercially. Therefore, it has been used by civilians as well as military agents alike.

    Due to its short case, the .308 Winchester became very popular with and suitable for the short action rifles.  If loaded with an expanding bullet, the round tears into the target and therefore, the 308s are ideally extensively used for hunting large targets as well, like a black bear, whitetail deer or even an elk. The 308 load has more drop at longer ranges, resulting in lower muzzle velocity.

    6.5 Creedmoor: Overview

    creedmoor

    The 6.5 Creedmoor is a newer launch, having released in 2007. However, it has taken over a lot of market share due to its high ballistic performance and lower recoil than other rounds. It is a centerfire rifle cartridge, with a length of 2.825 which can accommodate short-action bolt rifles as well as AR-10 semi-automatic ones.

    The 6.5 Creedmoor was designed for long-range target shooting and can deliver as further and beyond as 1,200 yards. It has also taken over the .308 Winchester in terms of being highly accurate in its aim. It also has a lesser recoil, making it a preferred choice over other long-range rounds among target shooters since lesser recoil means faster re-aiming.

    6.5 Creedmoor VS 308 Winchester

    6.5 Creedmoor VS 308

    6.5 Creedmoor is hailed as the upgraded version of the 308 Winchester, one that offers a lot more in the same domains. Even the parent cartridge of 6.5 Creedmoor was derived from the 308. 

    Let’s compare both these rounds in terms of their performance, availability, price and ballistics, and see which one comes out looking better.

    Ballistics Performance

    The 6.5 Creedmoor is sleeker and longer, making it ergonomically more aerodynamic. It can shoot as further as 1,000-1,200 yards, while the 308 is bounded to approximately 500 yards.

    The 6.5 Creedmoor propellants weigh 120 grains whose muzzle velocity after 500 yards is 2,078 feet per second, which is brilliant for long-range target shooting. The 308 uses bullets in the 150 grains weight range and the muzzle velocity drops to 1,963 feet per second after 500 yards.

    The difference between the two can be a huge deciding factor when it comes to precision shooting. They both start at a similar velocity, with 6.5 CM firing at 3,010 feet per second and the .308 Winchester firing at 3000 feet per second, but the .308 considerably slows down to the projectile weight and structure. The longer and thinner bullets of 6.5 CM allow it to keep its fast velocity stable over long distances.

    Cartridge Case

    6.5 Creedmoor has a substantially shorter case than the 308 Winchester. The case for 6.5 CM is derived from its parent cartridge, the .30 TC. The shorter case means a longer bullet, which is why it performs better in terms of ballistics.

    6.5 cartridge

    There is a difference in the sharpness of the shoulders of the two as well, which is why the recoil varies. The 6.5 Creedmoor has a 30 degrees shoulder angle as opposed to the 20 degrees of .308, making it sharper. The length of the shell casing of 6.5 CM bullet is 48.8mm.

    When used for longer periods, there is another difference that comes to light that brass in 6.5 Creedmoor lasts longer than the .308 Winchester, making it more durable.

    Available Ammo

    The bullets for the .308 Winchester weight about 150 grains, while those for 6.5 Creedmoor weigh 30 grains lighter at 120 grains. There is a huge variety available for both. The cost does not differ much, with the ammo for both at similar price levels.

    The bullet selection for .308 Winchester is essentially more than the 6.5 Creedmoor since it has been there for about 60 years, but the performance of the projectiles used by the latter is a lot better, having better ballistic caliber and more speed. They have a lower drop. The 6.5 Creedmoor bullets also have a better density which results in higher penetration into the target. For the 6.5 Creedmoor, a bullet weighing 140 grains has a higher caliber of .526 and a velocity of 2710 feet per second, which is more than what .308 has to offer.

    Some bullets available for the 6.5 Creedmoor are Hornady ELD Match 120 grains, 147 grains; Nosler Match Grade Custom Bullet Tip 140gr; Nosler Ballistic Tip 140gr, etc.

    The .308 Winchester uses Federal Fusion Ammo 165 grains, Fiocchi Barnes TTSX Load 168 grains, Federal Premium Vital-Shok 165 grains, and a whole lot more choices.

    With most brands, the ammo for the .308 Winchester is cheaper and more readily available than the 6.5 Creedmoor.

    Recoil And Lifespan

    The 6.5 Creedmoor definitely sees a lesser recoil due to the lighter weight of the bullets used. This makes the shooting considerably easier and takes lesser time in reacquiring the target, which is why it is preferred by the target-shooter and becoming more popular with the hunters as well.

    The barrel lifespan is more for the .308 Winchester. Due to a smaller bore of the 6.5 CM and the fact that it has a higher firing velocity, the barrel life is a little shorter than its rival.

    308 barrel

    Rifles Available

    As with the ammo, the rifles for 6.5 Creedmoor are not very easily available due to its recency in the launch. On the other hand, there is a huge availability of all short-action rifles style you’d want for the .308 Winchester. For example, if you take Savage rifles, they have about 10 models suitable for the 6.5 CM while a whopping 36 for the .308 Winchester.

    Also, the 6.5 Creedmoor being a dominantly long-range round, the rifles available are a little difficult to find because they are all precision, high-quality rifles, which cost more and have a specific use. Still, in the current market, the precision rifles for the .308 are a lot more easy and widely available than for the 6.5 CM.

    There are some precision rifles that do are apt for both cartridges, for instance, the Ruger Precision Rifle. It is also a beginners rifle for long-range shooting, so the fact that it caters to 6.5 Creedmoor should really punch up its popularity further.

    Pricing

    There isn’t a lot of difference between the pricing of 6.5 Creedmoor and the 308s. However, on an average, a round of 308s will cost about 10 cents less than a round of 6.5 Creedmoor.

    For example, with the Federal Premium Gold Medal Berger, a round of .308 Winchester costs $1.47 while a round of 6.5 Creedmoor costs $1.57. On the other hand, the Hornady American Whitetail ammo costs the same for both, priced at $1.07/round. However, the 6.5 Creedmoor is made by Hornady, therefore, any ammunition that comes from the brand is bound to be cheaper for the CM.

    PRODUCT

    IMAGE

    RATING

    PRICE

    308 Winchester

    308 winchester

    6.5 Creedmoor

    creedmoor

    The Conclusion

    The main difference between the 308s and the 6.5 Creedmoor lies in the range delivered and the precision. The 6.5 Creedmoor has a longer range and better accuracy, in short, a better ballistic performance. For long-range target shooter, the high velocity due to the aerodynamic build of the cartridge does a better job.

    The .308 Winchester is, however, more deadly when it comes to tearing the target down and has a longer barrel life. The ammo is widely and more readily available and there is a wider selection of rifles built for it. The bullet is more deadly and does more damage as well due to wider diameter. It falls short when it comes to long-range shooting when compared with the 6.5 Creedmoor due to heavier bullets and the structure.

    If you are looking for a round to target anywhere within 500 yards and have a restricting budget, .308 Winchester should be your go-to choice.

    For anyone looking at precision shooting at a range longer than 500 yards, 6.5 Creedmoor is a clear choice. It is definitely a little more expensive considering it’s still in its nascent stage of popularity, but the accuracy and the performance offered surpasses the long-standing reliability of .308 Winchester.