Clip vs. Magazine: What You Really Need To Know


Most of us wouldn’t care much if we interchanged the words “clips” with “magazines”. It is, however, crucial to realize that they are not the same and come with a considerable difference. We will be covering all the relevant details that you need to know between a clip and magazine in this article.

We have all marveled at the ease with which Arnold Schwarzenegger has handled his guns in movies like Predator and The Terminator. While the on-screen effect seemed unbelievable and mind-blowing, there is more to guns and ammunition than rippling muscles and adrenaline!

In this article, we will be exploring gun terminologies namely “clips” and “magazines” and throw some light on factors like how they are not the same and how will you be able to identify one from another and prevent a foot-in-the-mouth moment the next time you are discussing guns and ammo within your social circle.

Clip vs. Magazine

It is very important to be familiar with the terms used in a particular subject when you are discussing it. Having a sound knowledge of the subject would give you an added advantage to make your mark when you are conversing about it with your family members, friends or peers.

Just as we tend to use specific terms like offensive backfield, quarterback and fullback while discussing football, we would also need to get acquainted with the specific terms that are generally used in the area of guns and ammunition.

Clips and magazines are the two terms which are used interchangeably quite often and one is mistaken for the other. This is not true and there is a large difference between the two when it comes to their design, composition and usability in a gun.

A clip refers to a device that is used to store rounds of ammunition in a single pack. This means that it holds together individual rounds of ammunition and helps to keep them as one. It holds the ammo together so that it can be loaded easily into a magazine or a firearm cylinder.

A magazine, on the other hand, is a device that is designed to hold ammunition together and keep it ready to be fired when required. It loads the ammo into the chamber of the firearm.

Since these definitions may take time to sink in, it is quite easy to spot the reason behind the confusion created by these terms. In simple words, a clip comes in handy while feeding rounds into a magazine when required while a magazine is used to feed rounds into the firearm chamber in return.

When To Use What

Now that we have cleared the fog surrounding clips and magazines, it is quite apparent that the two are very different from each other and one cannot be substituted in place of the other. It is now important to understand when to use which term when there is a discussion about guns and ammunition.

A clip is a usually created out of a steel stamping and are engineered in different patterns depending on the type of gun into which it is to be loaded. Their main function is to load ammunition into a magazine that loads single rounds for firing.

Rifles come with a detachable and a non-detachable setting and the clips used in each type vary in their design. For riles that come with a non-detachable magazine, the clips are used to load bullets directly into the firearm. A clip can be loaded into a detachable magazine but such a setting is uncommon and not frequently seen.

A magazine is essentially an area from where ammunition is fed into the firing chamber as and when required. A magazine can be fitted internally into a firearm or it can be removable. It is almost the size of the gun itself that is responsible for feeding ammo into the firearm chamber.

A clip is smaller in size and therefore cannot hold more than 10 rounds while magazines have a larger capacity and are capable of holding up to a 100 rounds.

Types Of Clips

Since clips are used to load ammunition into the magazine, they are compact and are easy to load. They also help in saving a lot of time which would otherwise have been spent on loading ammo every time you fired from the gun. These clips come in various forms and can be used in a wide variety of guns that are available today.

Stripper Clip

This kind of a clip is used to load internal box magazines where a stripper clip binds the ammunition together on a piece of metal and keeps it ready to be loaded. This is the most widely used type of clip that is available today.

In order to use this clip, you will need to position it on top of the magazine and give it a push down into the magazine to load it in bolt-action rifles or semi-automatics. It can also be used in a detachable magazine by using the same operating mechanism.

  • Original Russian Made Pouch
  • 5 stripper clips (repros)
  • Cleaning kit

En Bloc Clip

An En Bloc clip is an ejectable clip that is automatically discarded from a gun once all the ammo has been used up. It is inserted completely into the magazine which pushes the rounds up into the chamber and keeps them ready for action.

This clip is found in old guns and is not very popular today due to the availability of stripper clips and their ease of use.

Half Moon/Full Moon Clip

These are the classic ones that we have seen in movies where the round chamber within a revolver rotates to load a fresh bullet after the previous one has been fired. These clips are usually seen in revolvers with pistol cartridges such as 0.45 Auto and 9mm.

A half moon and a full clip can hold 3 and 6 rounds respectively as they can be easily inserted into the firing cylinder of a revolver. While this type has faced a stiff competition from speed loaders, their advantage is that they help to discard the shell casings almost immediately after the rounds are fired.

Types Of Magazines

Magazines are available in a variety of types today. While some are detachable, the others are internally attached. Some even have the capacity to feed the rounds directly from the tube! We will be discussing a few of these types in this article.

Box Magazine

This is the most common and the most famous type of magazines that can be seen today. It comes in two variants - the internal box magazine and the detachable box magazine. The loading and firing mechanisms may be a bit different from each other but their functions remain the same more or less.

It is commonly seen in bolt action rifles and in the older versions of semi-automatic rifles like the SKS and M1 Garand. The magazines can be loaded in two ways - through the top of the gun or with the use of clips.

Detachable Box Magazine

Magazines are a tool to load the ammo straight into the firing chamber so that it could be used when the need arises. A detachable box magazine is also one of the most preferred types of magazine that is in demand today and is seen in popular rifles like the AR-15, Ruger 10/22, semi-automatic rifles and AK variants.

In this, the detachable box stays apart from the firearm despite it is loaded. This makes it a safe and also makes it quicker to use when the need arises. It is also easy to carry and transport than many other magazines.

STANAG Magazine

These magazines are designed according to the NATO agreement that permits soldiers to exchange their rifles even though the models are different. This magazine is designed to fit with rifles of different makes like 5.56mm and firearms belong to AR, M16 and M4 families along with others like IMI, Beretta and SIG.

Tubular Magazine

Firearms come with a fixed magazine in the form of a tube that uses the combination of a tube, a spring and the trigger to load ammo into the firing chamber. The rounds can be loaded one at a time into the magazine from where they are loaded into the firing chamber.

This type of a magazine is usually seen in firearms like .22 rifles, shotguns and lever action rifles.

Other Gun Terms That Are Wrongly Used Interchangeably

1. Grip vs. Handle

“Handle” and “grip” are frequently the same elements when talking about many items humans use daily. Knives, scissors, and other tools all have handles and grips, and the two terms both talk about the part of the thing you put your hands on. But when we are talking about guns, these two terms are not interchangeable. Usually, when you’re talking about the handle or the grip, you're just trying to say grip.

Term grip is talking about to the part of the gun that you hold in the form you take as you open fire. The grip is what helps you aim, use the trigger, and safety.

On the other hand, handles are the part of a gun that you can hold onto when you are carrying it around. This isn’t the part you grip to fire the weapon. It’s all about carrying it around. If you were to mix these two up, you'd look pretty silly.

2. Precision vs. Accuracy

To some people, the various meanings between “accuracy” and “precision” don’t make much of a difference. But if you want to become an improved shooter, and be knowledgable on the topic, the difference is actually very significant.

Accuracy is talking about the proximity your shot is to the target. If you fire the shot in the bullseye, then you had an accurate shot.

Precision means how tight your group of shots is. If you fire an entire barrel and the grouping of all the shots fired is in the same clumped area then your shoot was precise.

If you are a good shooter, your fire will be both accurate and precise. A good rule of thumb to keep in mind for both outcomes is that you need to place a harmonious number of shots close enough to your target. If this is a struggle for you, training and practice can help a ton to reach the goals of being precise and accurate. Aim to get both outcomes, not just one or the other. This is the practice of a good shooter.

Some tips to help you achieve these two terms: pay special close attention to the shots that do get close to the target. Become aware. Take note of what exactly your posture and position when you made that shot. Once you realize your form and the reason for success, practice duplicating it every time you shoot. This can increase your precision and accuracy.

3. Pistol vs. Handgun

In the shooting world, it really depends on what kind of person you are. Some use these two terms interchangeably, while others fight you to the core that they are separate, and should not be used as one and the same. With this term specifically, it’s truly up to you which you use. Let's discuss.

The term "handguns" should speak of any gun that is held in your hand and then fired.  Usually smaller, these don’t set up camp on your shoulder like rifles or shotguns.

4. Fully Automatic vs. Machine Gun

Machine guns and fully automatic guns don’t mean the same thing in every instance, though they can. This is another instance where the two words are similar in meaning but distinct enough to be important.

Fully automatic applies to the firing mode that's set up on a gun. Depending on the mode, one pull of the trigger can fire tons of bullets, but one at a time. Machine guns are fully automatic, and the law lumps all of these and fully automatic guns into the same, controlled categories.

All machine guns are fully automatic weapons, but not all fully automatic weapons are necessarily machine guns. The determining factor is how long and fast they are meant to be fired for. These two terms can be pretty confusing, but the good news is that they are not super vital to keep separate. It is mostly a matter of your own personal preference.

5. Silencer vs. Uppressor

This one is more difficult to pin down than the two before it. The term “silencer” is not the proper term, but it is said frequently. If you want to get technical, then suppressors will describe it accurately.

Suppressors are parts that connect to the barrel of your gun to reduce the loudness of a gunshot. They don’t completely eliminate the sound, so do not get your hopes up. What they are technically doing is stifling the amount of air being released at the point of release in order to restrict the sound, and therefore get the loudness under control.

The term "silencer" was coined from the entertainment industry. It has been said in movies, TV shows, and podcasts, but it is not an accurate phrase, and does not represent what is happening to a gun correctly.

6. Negligent Discharge vs. Accidental Discharge

Knowing how to decipher between accidental and negligent discharge is vital. This is because correctly using the terms can change the public’s comprehension of firearms and the safety that's involved. When people use the term “accidental discharge” inaccurately, it’s strengthening the idea that guns are innately bad. This is not true. Actually, the majority of crimes called accidental discharge covered aren’t accidents. They are intentional.

Accidental discharge is when your gun fires involuntarily because of an unexpected and essentially unpreventable failure of the weapon. This happens rarely, almost never, unless there is a built-in issue already present.

Negligent discharge is most common. This is when the gun fires because of unsafe use or negligence toward the weapon.

The reason these two distinctions are so crucial to make is that negligence is preventable by using proper safety and accidental is not, because it cannot be avoided or foreseen.

When a gun fires while in the holster, this is usually negligent in nature because the gun owner left the safety on. This could have easily been avoided if safety was applied. Though this isn't a reason for applause at all, naming it correctly takes the guilt off the gun itself and puts where it applies, which is on the negligence of the gun owner.

Shoot It!

We have covered already covered the basics related to clips and magazines along with the differentiation that proves that they are not the same and can definitely not be used interchangeably. There is always a lot of information available for you to read up in case the talk about guns and ammo fascinates you.

Being able to tell a clip from a magazine with add to your credibility the next time you are out discussing guns with your social acquaintances or taking shooting lessons from the experts. The easiest way of distinguishing the two would be to know that a magazine comes with a spring while a clip does not!

Best Semi Auto Shotgun: A List of the Top 5

semi auto shotgun

Finding The Best Semi-Automatic Shotgun: Top 5

If you’re an avid firearm enthusiast, then you would definitely know everything about shotguns and these guns were probably among the first weapons you were introduced to. Shotguns are excellent firearms and are ideal right from training, if you are a beginner, to providing the best home defense. Shotguns are even commonly used in the military. You will want to find the best semi auto shotgun to add to your collection.

All of us are quite familiar with pump-action shotguns. So, what are semi-automatic shotguns? Semi-automatic shotguns are essentially an upgraded variety of the pump-action shotguns. Semi-auto shotguns are firm favorites with gun lovers for their reduced recoil and quick firepower.

The main difference between the pump-action and semi-auto shotguns is that in the pump-action shotgun, you need to pump the fore-end of the gun into itself to remove the empty cartridge and reload a fresh one and this action must be repeated after firing each round. In the case of a semi-auto, this action occurs automatically via a gas or a recoil-operated mechanism, which enables you to fire rounds continuously.

Best Semi Auto Shotgun Comparison Table:

Overview Of Finding The Best Semi-Automatic Shotgun

The origin of semi-auto shotguns goes way back to 1902, when the first prototype, the Browning Auto-5 was manufactured and it was in production right until 1999. Back then, not many people trusted the semi-automatic and with limitations in technology, the semi-auto had its own set of issues. With time and advancements in gun technology, these flaws were rectified and high-quality, reliable semi-automatic shotguns from different manufacturers entered the market.

Gradually, the upgraded semi-automatics became popular with gun enthusiasts and even started being used by the military with good reason. They found that the many rounds of 12-gauge buckshot shot continuously is extremely useful for fighting in war, target shooting or hunting.

Not long ago, there were very few reputable semi-automatic shotguns such as Remington, Mossberg and Browning in the market. But now, with the improvement in quality and a fall in prices, there are many more manufacturers and the demand for the newest and best semi-automatic shotgun has risen.

How A Semi-Automatic Shotgun Works

In the case of the pump-action shotgun, you must manually slide the fore-end of the gun, which makes use of the spring-operated system to eject an empty cartridge and insert a new one simultaneously, whereas, in the case of a semi-automatic this action occurs automatically and cycles through the shells in 2 ways – via a gas system like the AR-15 and a recoil-operated mechanism.

While both the mechanisms i.e. gas and recoil-operated, make use of energy to reload the shotgun, they do it in different ways. The shotguns which are gas powered use the high-pressure gas which is released after the firing and use it to cycle the ammunition. On the other hand, shotguns that are recoil-operated make use of kinetic energy to cycle the ammo.

Although, over the years, the gas-loading mechanism has been in use in most semi-automatic and automatic guns, the recoil-operation mechanism was more favored.

Pros And Cons Of Using A Semi-Automatic Shotgun

PROS

CONS

  • Although it is recommended that you don’t try shooting with a single hand,      it is easier to do it using a semi-automatic shotgun.
  • The kickback of a semi-automatic shotgun is not as strong as that of a gun that makes use of a gas mechanism.
  • Semi-automatic shotguns have a more rapid rate of firing than manual guns.

  • Semi-automatic shotguns are more complex in terms of the design, which makes them much heavier and the cleaning of the shotgun is also much  more difficult, especially if you are a beginner.

  • These shotguns are more likely to jam compared to break-action and pump shotguns.

  • Many of the semi-auto shotguns cannot cycle low-powered ammunition reliably.

Advantages Of Using A Semi-Automatic Shotgun

The best semi-auto shotgun (this is all personal preference/opinion) is excellent for tactical situation and competitions. These guns are especially beneficial for beginners who find it difficult to engage their target while cycling the ammunition with a pump-operated gun.

Disadvantages Of Using A Semi-Automatic Shotgun

N/A

How Good Are Semi-Automatic Shotguns For New Gun Owners?

Semi-automatic shotguns are much simpler to operate when compared to manually operated guns. All you need to do is charge the gun initially making use of the charging handle. The shotgun will run automatically until it is empty. When the gun is empty, the bolts of the shotgun will lock to the rear, offering a clear tactile, visual and auditory sign that the shotgun is empty.

On the other hand, in the case of a pump-action shotgun, there is no auditory or tactile feedback to alert you that the shotgun is empty. The only way that you can know is by keeping track of the rounds or when the gun clicks when an empty chamber is encountered. All these factors make the semi-automatic shotgun a great choice, especially if you are a new gun owner.

Selecting the best semi-automatic shotgun may be quite a challenge, given the number of brands and models available in the market. We have put together a comprehensive review of some of the best semi-automatic shotguns that can help you decide the best one to buy.

Finding The Best Semi-Automatic Shotgun

Remington Versa Max Sportsman

Remington Versa Max Sportsman

Remington is a renowned and a popular firearm manufacturer and the Versa Max Sportsman from Remington is undoubtedly an excellent shotgun. It is extremely versatile and delivers excellent performance.

The Versa Max is a gas-operated shotgun, which means that it makes use of high-pressure gas behind the shot cup, which helps to drive the action. The Versaport system of the Versa Max handles the gas pressure and adjusts the pressure according to the size of the shell being used. The shotgun is equipped with 2 small pistons that enable efficient self-cleaning. The gas-operated mechanism makes the shotgun very versatile and you can keep shooting with it for days without the gun failing.

The Versa Max features a stock made from reinforced polymer material, which makes the shotgun extremely lightweight, but at the same time, the gun is quite sturdy and durable too.  The gun is equipped with a large safety, so that you don’t fire the weapon accidentally. The shotgun is quite compact that allows it to fit easily in your gun safe.

Although the price of the Versa Max is higher than some of the other shotgun models, it is a real workhorse and offers great reliability, which ensures that the gun fires without missing, every time you pull the trigger. The 12-gauge auto-loading shotgun is built for competitions and is excellent for 3-gun shooting competitions. And, if you love hunting or shooting geese as a sport, then the Versa Max Sportsman is definitely the best shotgun to buy.

Benelli M2

Benelli M2

The Benelli M2 is among the top performing shotgun models available in the market. The shotgun is extremely rugged and delivers a nimble shot. Instead of the gas system, the Benelli M2 work on the inertia system, which has fewer moving parts and allows the shotgun to take on any kind of 12-gauge cartridge and also 3-inch magnums.

Thanks to the inertia mechanism of the M2, the fore-end of the shotgun is quite slim and overall, the gun is quite lightweight and feels quite comfortable to handle. The design of the Benelli M2, lets you have a super-fast and efficient operation that fires each time that you take a shot. The inertia system also offers greater benefit compared to the gas exhaust and makes it easier to keep the shotgun clean.

The Benelli M2 comes in both a 12-gauge, as well as a 20-gauge options and the recoil spring of the shotgun offers ultra-quick reloading time, irrespective of the type of load. The synthetic stock of the gun and the fore-end keep it in great working condition.

The shotgun is available in various barrel sizes, 24 inches, 26 inches and 28 inches, and all have a ventilated rib. Very easy to clean and maintain, the Benelli M2 is multi-functional and is a great shotgun for self-defense, hunting, competitions and security needs.

Browning A5

Browning A5

The semi-automatic shotgun has come a long way since the Browning A5, the gun which started the niche of semi-automatic shotguns. The Browning A5 started off originally as a military weapon and has now become the most used weapon for home defense and competitive shooting. The Browning A5 is a new and an upgraded version of the vintage model.

While the all new A5 retains the shape of the original Browning A5, almost everything else of the shotgun has been upgraded. The A5 offers the same functionality as the older model; however, it is much lighter and makes use of the Kinematic Drive, the recoil mechanism that allows you to pick between the light and heavy loads.

The A5 is a very balanced weapon; it is reliable and very easy to use. The shotgun offers very rapid cycling as it uses the recoil of the gun, making the A5 among the fastest cycling guns available. There are several versions of the A5 available and irrespective of whatever you want to use your shotgun for, there is an A5 available for that.

The light weight of the A5’s muzzle and butt pad allows you to use it continuously without getting tired. And, the shotgun offers very fast and reliable cycling and with minimal kickback. The best part is that the Browning A5 comes with a 5-year or 100,000-round warranty. The A5 is indeed a timeless firearm that you can keep as a prized heirloom for generations.

Mossberg 930

Mossberg 930

If you’re looking for the best semi auto shotgun that offers reliable home defense, then the Mossberg 930 is definitely an excellent choice. The shotgun is easy to use and is very functional. Simple and straightforward, the gun does not boast of many bells and whistles and it is quite inexpensive, considering its high-quality build.

Like other shotguns, the Mossberg 930 has various versions – for hunting, competitive shooting and also the tactical version. The dual vent system of the 930 enables very rapid cycling and the sights are also very easy to use. The dual-gas system of the shotgun reduces the recoil impact and its high capacity enables the gun to shoot 9 rounds at a fantastic speed. The barrel clamp of the shotgun ensures that the stability is maximized, while the fiber optic sight at the front allows you to keep your eyes on your target.

The biggest advantage of the Mossberg 930 is its very affordable price. The easy on the pocket cost of the shotgun along with its high quality and reliability, make the 930 the best budget semi-automatic shotgun.

Beretta A300

Beretta A300

One of the finest semi-automatic shotguns, the Beretta A300 is not only very good-looking but offers excellent quality too. The advantages of the A300 is its light weight, excellent balance and reliability. And, despite being lightweight, the shotgun handles recoil very well.

Also, surprisingly, considering its light weight, the A300 offers excellent balance and overall, shoots very well. Not only is the A300 very easy to use, it is extremely easy to maintain too. The shotgun can be cleaned easily by breaking it down.

The durability and reliability of the A300 along with its quite affordable pricing, makes it an excellent weapon for hunting.

The most important aspect of owning a semi-automatic shotgun is its maintenance. A semi-automatic shotgun that is maintained well is less likely to fail. And, the biggest plus of a semi-automatic shotgun is that its recoil is not as hard as pump-action guns, which makes it an excellent firearm, especially for beginners. And, the firing rate and extra rounds make it a fantastic weapon for experienced, veteran shooters too.

Odd and Simple Semi Automatic Specific Adjustments

Even the best semi auto shotgun is going to be a bit different than other guns, such as rifles. Certain things make life more comfortable, and others that will require more patience and research. Below we will teach you how to treat them differently, and care for them well, quirks and all.

1. Properly Feed

Your old pump gun would eat anything you chose to give it. You could feed it leftovers, and it would work completely normal. Semi autos can be somewhat picky eaters. This issue has gotten better over time, but it is not fully improved yet. You may have to take that one up with the creators. Very light loads won't cycle in many semiautos, meaning you need to buy food differently. Think of this just as you would if you had a guest with particular food intolerances. Treat your semi auto the same way.

2. Close the Bolt Correctly

You need to let the bolt of a semi auto gun that is inactive slam closed instead of trying to ease it closed. Many hunters will take the easy way out in order to be stealthy, but if it doesn't seal completely, the gun may not fire. If you are having a lot of trouble with this, you run the risk of bumping an inactive gun's bolt out of place, so it is important to double check that it's entirely shut each time it's inactive.

3. Make it a Friend

Some shooters and gun manuals suggest crazy things to break a new gun in. In my option, most modern semi autos are in perfect working condition when taken right out of the packaging. A few semi autos do seem to work better and switch out loads after they have been shot quite a bit in order to be broken in, but this is truly a personal thing. If nothing else, it can be fun to take the fun out for a good couple of rounds as soon as you get it!

4. Learn How to Carry and Hold it

It takes a certain push back level from your shoulder to get a gun this large to work correctly. Smaller shooters can experience some trouble with this.

If you aim sideways and hold a semi auto like you would a smaller gun, it may not work how it is meant to. Making sure to hold the semi auto gun properly can fix this problem. Another good fix is to build up arm muscle. Being small does not mean being weak or incapable.

5. Shield Your Semi Auto From the Cold

Cold weather can make a semi auto slow as the oil expands. Lubing up the insides of your gun is important in these conditions. Do your research, but test out different brands of lube as well. Almost every shooter has a lube review, and it can be overwhelming. The most important thing to remember is not to overdo it with the lube. Follow the bottle's recommended amount.

6. Learn How to Release

Some semi autos, have a carrier release button near the trigger guard. You have to push it if you want the bolt to remain locked in the open position when you pull it back.

7. Follow Ring Instructions

Some older guns have friction rings on the magazine as part of their abilities. Be sure to use the specific mode that is laid out for you the gun's manual. The manual is your best friend. You can shoot your semi auto with rings missing or improper arrangement, but you risk breaking the gun over time. Every part of this gun has a specific purpose, so follow the instructions carefully.

8. Pick a Piston

A few guns come with two gas pistons. There is one for small loads and one for larger ones. Make sure you've had the right one installed. Your gun will shoot everything with the "light loads" piston installed, and if you don't switch to the larger, you have the potential of damaging the gun.

How to Clean a Semi Automatic Gun

1. Buy a Cleaning Kit

Each part of your gun has a distinct cleaning brush that removes bits of materials that build up over time. It is best to use solutions intended to remove metal layers of build up, instead of just a normal solution. They are not all created equal.

2. Get the Manuel and Disassemble

If you are going to correctly clean the semi auto, it needs to be disassembled properly and completely to get access into all the various pieces that need cleaning. Disassemble the tool on a work table, preferably a wooden on that can get scratched up. Then lay out all the parts of the weapon, and clean each part thoroughly one at a time. Move along as the manual suggests.

3. Clean It with Cloths, Brushes, and Solutions

Run a clean cloth with solution down the weapon, then run a dry one down absorb the solution. Take the brush in your cleaning kit, dip it in the appropriate solvent for the materials you're working with, and run the brush the weapon. Make an up and down motion on all the various parts. Get deep into all the cracks and crevices.

4. Clean the Magazine

With a lightly solution rag, rub the magazine tenderly to remove any signs of wear from loading the shells. Then set this aside with the other various parts and pieces.

5. Reassemble

In order to reassemble the weapon, take precise care to look over any piece that may have wear and tear, fingerprints, or solution. Once you reassemble the semi auto, wipe it down with the lightly oiled cloth and set it in whatever safe place you have typically kept it in. Don't leave it out on the table you worked on for little hands to get ahold of it, for obvious safety reasons. Gun safety urges gun owners not to store a loaded gun. Specifically, for semi automatics not to be stored with any bullets inside.

Final Thoughts on The Best Semi Auto Shotgun

So why should you own a semi-automatic shotgun? Semi-autos are great to handle and are excellent to shoot with. You can get a rapid stream of bullets in quick succession, which is very appealing to gun enthusiasts, especially for the purpose of home defense and hunting. Semi-automatic shotguns are excellent weapons for hunting and are commonly used to hunt various types of game birds, deer, hogs and other medium- or large-sized game.  

Although there are some drawbacks of semi-automatic shotguns such as they are not as reliable as pump-action shotguns, they can jam and are more expensive, the huge advantage of semi-auto shotguns is their very rapid rate of fire and reduced recoil. They are extremely easy to shoot with and shotgun shells are quite inexpensive.

Rimfire VS Centerfire: Ammo Comparisons – Max Blagg

Rimfire vs Centerfire

There isn’t a lot of difference on how guns work. The major difference lies in the type of primer ignition system used in the gun which leaves beginners in a fix as they constantly wonder about the better primer ignition option between rimfire vs. centerfire.

The functioning mechanism of guns is designed on the same concept. A powder charge is filled in a pipe that is sealed from one end. Ignition in the powder charge stimulates an explosion where a projectile is launched from the sealed end of the pipe.

The question of choosing one ignition mechanism over the other depends on the purpose for which a gun is going to be used. These activities include using a gun for hunting or simply learning to shoot at a shooting class.

Modern bullets use one of the two primer ignition systems - rimfire or centerfire where each mechanism has its own purpose and uses. The major difference between these two ignition mechanisms is their design and method of operation.

We will be exploring the details of rimfire vs centerfire in this article and help you understand the niches in which they operate along with their working mechanisms and differences.

Parts of a Cartridge: Both Rimfire and Centerfire

Every cartridge, or "round" in other words, has four parts to it: 

  • Bullet (not the entire cartridge, just the projectile)
  • Propellant
  • Primer
  • Case
  • It doesn't matter if the cartridge is centerfire ammunition or rimfire ammunition, these four components exist in every single cartridge. Generally, all bullets work the same way. The firing pin hits the primer, and that creates a very small explosion.

    The small explosion that it creates will set off the gunpowder, and that forces the bullet to shoot forward, out of the gun through the barrel.

    So, where exactly is the difference between centerfire vs rimfire ammunition? That lies within where the primer is located.

    What Is Rimfire?

    Rimfire

    A rimfire cartridge was first used in the year 1845 and was made by evenly distributing the primer inside the rim pipe. It worked wonders as the cartridge was one-piece and did not require any assembly before firing. The single piece structure also helped to prevent the entry of dirt, dust and moisture inside the cartridge and made it very convenient to use.

    Rimfire design faced two major challenges during the initial period. The first was to distribute the primer evenly at the base of the cartridge. Then, the second was the need to utilize a soft metal for the construction of the rim.

    The rim was needed to be created out of a highly malleable metal so that it could be dented easily by the firing pin. Copper was the most preferred choice but it came with a disadvantage - it was not possible to load a highly powered load because of the risk of blowback.

    Rimfire technology was used during the Civil War in the Spencer repeating rifle which fired a .52 caliber rimfire bullet. Even though the bullet speed was low, it was capable of inflicting major damage wherever it hit. It also displayed a capacity of firing 20 to 30 shots per minute. This was far superious when compared to other guns used during that time.

    Common Types of Rimfire Ammunition

  • .22 Long Rifle -- this is the most common type
  • .22 Short
  • .17 Hornady Mach 2
  • .17 Hornady Magnum Rifle
  • .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire
  • Pros of Rimfire:

  • Low recoil: this makes rimfire ammo perfect for beginners
  • Cheap: rimfire ammo is easy to manufacture, so it's able to sell for a lower price
  • Cons of Rimfire:

  • Reliability issues: Sometimes the primer compound doesn't make full contact with the           entire rim, so it may fail to fire at times. 
  • Not reloadable: this is because the primer is inside the bottom of the case
  • Small calibers: this is because of its design
  • What Is Centerfire?

    Centerfire

    First off, to keep things simple, centerfire rounds look exactly how they sound. If you can see a circular primer in the middle, at the base of the casing, then it is a centerfire round. Centerfire ammunition always has the primer in the center, hence the name of it. If it doesn't have this, then it is most likely rimfire. 

    Now, for more of a backstory and details on centerfire ammunition.

    Centerfire cartridges were invented close to 1812, much before rimfire cartridges were discovered. However, they were not quite reliable to use and continuous changes were made to its design until it was finally perfected during the year 1855.

    It started gaining a lot of popularity and was used as a standard ignition mechanism for both rifles and handguns by the year 1860. This comprised of a primer cap that was placed at the center of a cartridge. The primer cap was made out of brass or copper.

    It was possible to construct the cartridge and the primer cap using different materials as the primer cap was an external component and could be fit into the cartridge separately. This enabled the makers to construct a stronger cartridge. That could be dispelled with greater velocity and could be used on bullets of all sizes.

    Where Could This Go Wrong?

    An issue that cropped up with using separate metals was sealing. It was very difficult to seal two different metals together so that they could be extremely cohesive. This gave space for moisture and dirt to enter these cartridges and made them difficult to use.

    The solution to this problem was found in the form of lacquer, which was used to seal the different metals tightly and prevent the entry of foreign particles inside the cartridge, which could compromise the ammunition. The result was a highly developed and effective ignition mechanism that was safe to use and could fire at a long range.

    Pros of Centerfire Ammo:

  • Perfect for long range hunting
  • Highly reliable and accurate: makes centerfire ammo perfect for self-defense
  • Made in just about any caliber size: allows you to use it with just about any gun
  • Reloadable
  • Higher bullet power and speed
  • Cons of Centerfire Ammo:

  • Higher priced than rimfire
  • Higher recoil
  • Rimfire VS Centerfire - Difference Between The Two

    We have already taken a look at rimfire and centerfire cartridges and their mechanisms, along with their construction aspects and invention history. This has shed light on the fact that both of these cartridges are not the same and come with some differences, which are spotted in their design and operating mechanisms.

    A rimfire cartridge has a lower power, and thus can operate well at a closer range. Though modern technology has enabled the use of different metals and alloys in their construction to make way for a longer range, the cost factor shoots up and they are not as effective as centerfire cartridges.

    Centerfire cartridges can be reused multiple times by replacing the primer cap. This factor increases the cost of these cartridges, but one can avail the economies of scale in the long run. A rimfire cartridge, on the other hand, is inexpensive but cannot be reused, which makes it an expensive affair if you use it regularly.

    Rimfire cartridges are available in .22 caliber shots whereas centerfire cartridges are available in almost every caliber size. This has made it a favorite with the police forces and the military who use ammunition and are constantly in need of better weapons and equipment.

    Centerfire cartridges are also extremely safe to use. A shot with a higher caliber too is not as dangerous as it would be while using a rimfire cartridge. The primer pipes are completely sealed and are impervious to moisture and dust particles.

    The Working Mechanism

    The working mechanisms of rimfire and centerfire cartridges are different and it is essential to know them as they will help you pick the best cartridge which is suited to your needs.

    Centerfire cartridges have a separate primer cap which is attached to the center of the rim pipe. This enables an even ignition when compared to the rimfire cartridge in which only a part of the gunpowder is ignited despite it being evenly distributed throughout the rim pipe.

    The self-contained primer also makes centerfire cartridges more reliable and easier to shoot even while using high caliber models. Hence, these cartridges are more suitable for military use and for self-defense.

    A rimfire cartridge is more suited for hunting and practice purposes because the primer casing is built into the cartridge, which makes it more susceptible to manufacturing defects. At the same time, a shot fired using a rimfire cartridge is more accurate as it generates lesser recoil when compared to a centerfire cartridge.

    Comparison Table

    Product Name

    Image

    Details

    Rimfi​re

    Rimfire
    • Cartridge has a lower power
    • Can operate well at a closer range
    • Centerfire cartridges are also extremely safe to use

    Centerfire

    Centerfire
    • Cartridges can be reused multiple times
    • Rimfire cartridges are available in .22 caliber shots
    • Cartridges are available in almost every caliber size

    Which Is Better?

    The general firing mechanism of a gun is based on the ignition of the primer. The explosion caused by igniting the primer will propel a bullet forward and help it to reach its target. This happens every time a gun is fired regardless of whether it is a rimfire cartridge or a centerfire cartridge.

    When a centerfire cartridge is used, the explosion takes place at the center since that is where the primer is placed. This leads to a greater degree of efficiency and consistency and the bullet is fired with a greater velocity.

    While rimfire cartridges are best suited for hunting game and close range targets, it is difficult to lay your hands on one because of their limited availability. They are also prone to manufacturing problems which may lead to misfires and accidents. Thus, it is not advisable to use them for self-defense.

    A centerfire cartridge is widely available. While a rimfire cartridge is popular in the .22 caliber rifle, the centerfire cartridge is available in almost every other caliber size. It is very safe to use and is hence in great demand in police forces and military.

    Centerfire cartridges can also be used for a number of times, which raises the bar for other cartridges. Multiple uses of a single cartridge help to even out the expense of buying a centerfire cartridge. which makes it a profitable investment in addition to being highly safe and effective.

    Rimfire vs Centerfire: Our Final Thoughts

    While comparing both types of ammunition, it is quite easy to say that centerfire cartridges are safer and more reliable when compared to rimfire cartridges. They are designed superiorly and are widely available today due to their use in almost every rifle and handgun available to us.

    As we compare the differences, it is imperative to note that rimfire cartridges are on a decline whereas centerfire cartridges are the future. The use of a primer cap instead of a compound make centerfire cartridges more reliable and safe to use and the boxer design makes it very easy to extract a used primer and replace it with a new one.

    While the reloading feature is available in rimfire cartridges too, it can be done only by using a specialized kit designed for this purpose. At the same time, the procedure is complex and needs delicate handling which makes it time-consuming and not worth all the effort.


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    List Of The Top 5 Best Concealed Carry Guns Review

    Walther is renowned as a producer of high-quality and reliable guns that can fire several thousands of rounds without misfiring and the PPQ M2 is one of the finest products from Walther. The 9mm handgun has an ergonomic grip. However, the best feature of the handgun is its trigger, which is probably the smoothest that you will ever find in any handgun.

    The Walther PPQ M2 is available with a 4-inch or a 5-inch barrel. Although both calibers are great choices, the 5-inch barrel is a better handgun for aiming. The PPQ M2 has a 15 round capacity and the pistol boasts of having striker fire action and its trigger pull is very light, which makes the handgun excellent for beginners.

    The Walther PPQ M2 is equipped with 3 automatic safeties, Picatinny equipment rail and 3 sculpted-grip backstraps that can be interchanged and offers a custom fit and a quick audible reset. The handgun is loaded with features and is extremely versatile, which makes it among the best handguns in our list.

    COMPARISON TABLE

    PRODUCT

    IMAGE

    RATING

    PRICE

    SIG Sauer P365 9mm Pistol

    SIG Sauer P365 9mm Pistol

    Springfield Armory 911

    Springfield Armory 911

    Ruger Security 9

    Ruger Security 9

    Walther Arms PPQ SC Sub-Compact Gun

    Walther Arms PPQ SC Sub-Compact Gun

    Taurus 1911 Commander

    Taurus 1911 Commander

    Factors To Consider Before Buying A Concealed Carry Gun

    Factors To Consider Before Buying A Concealed Carry Gun

    However, before you actually set out to buy a concealed carry gun for your personal use, here are some factors that you must consider:

    Accuracy

    Accuracy

    Check if you can hit your target accurately with the gun just out of the box i.e. without making any modifications to the gun that may affect legal aspects. Some models of guns may be more accurate as compared to others. However, training, experience and practice are also major factors that affect the accuracy of the gun.

    Reliability

    Reliability

    When buying the gun ensure that the gun is well made and the wood and metal finish and fit are good. Ensure that the gun is made with high-quality materials and offers mechanical strength and functional durability. Some guns are sensitive to the ammunition they use and will not accept all types of ammunition. So, it’s a good idea to check the ammunition that the gun can accommodate. And finally, check the gun’s consistency and that you can hit your target most times over repeated trials.

    Ergonomics

    Ergonomics

    The ergonomics or the fit of the gun should be right. You should be able to work the controls of the gun properly and check if the gun fits your fingers and hand correctly. For example, if you can reach the safety, trigger, magazine release and decocker easily, the gun is comfortable to use according to your physical requirements, such as hand size and length of fingers and in case you have any medical conditions such as carpal tunnel or arthritis you must also consider other factors such as overall weight and balance, grip angle, grip size, caliber, muzzle size, etc.

    Trigger Press

    Trigger Press

    Determine the force required to press the trigger and if you can handle it. Check the trigger travel distance, as the shorter the distance the trigger moves, it is less likely that you will move the sights from the alignment before the handgun fires. The consistency with which you press the trigger is important i.e. long and heavy in the case of double action (DA) always and short and light in the case of single action (SA) and switching between the two require a lot of practice.

    Barrel Length

    Check the barrel length of the handgun – sub-compact (less than 3.5 inches), compact (3.5 inches to 5 inches) and full-size (5 inches or more). The guns having shorter barrels are more difficult to shoot with, as the sight radius i.e. the distance between the front and rear of the sights is shorter and they also have more recoil. The length of the barrel affects the side cycle speed and also the speed at which the ammunition comes out of the gun’s magazine. And, you must also remember that the width of the handgun is more important compared to the length for purposes of concealability.

    Sights

    You must check out the sights of the gun before buying it. Check the quality, type and radius of the sights. If the sights are farther apart, the errors will be smaller in the alignment which affects where the bullet will hit. 3-dot sights are quite popular with shooters.

    Weight

    A lighter gun does not mean that it is better. If a gun is very light, with the recoil, the muzzle flip also increases, which slows down your speed of the follow-up shots and this increases the chances of missing the target. If the gun is light, then it is a good idea to train and practice shooting with it. Also, you can use a holster and a belt to support the weight of the gun if it is too heavy.

    Caliber

    When you’re starting off, it is a good idea to begin with a 9mm gun, as the recoil is manageable and you can also find the ammunition for the gun at a reasonable price. It is better to opt for a smaller gun that you can shoot well with, rather than a gun with a bigger caliber that you may miss with. If you want a gun with a higher caliber, then you could opt for the .45ACP, as the slower velocity and heavier bullets help to reduce the recoil and handling the gun is much better. Also, if you’re using the handgun for self-defense and personal protection, then it is better to use hollow points as they are better to stop your assailant and they do not over-penetrate compared to “ball” rounds.

    Cost

    Usually, pistols are more expensive compared to revolvers. However, since buying a gun is a lifetime investment and is also important to protect your life, you should consider the quality, reliability and brand of the gun and the cost of the gun and the ammunition should not be your primary criterion for selection.

    Concealability

    If the concealability of the gun is the most important factor, then you should ensure that the gun you buy has the proper dimensions in terms of the overall length, height and width that allows you to hide the gun easily. The width of the gun is more important than its length for example, pistols are much thinner compared to revolvers with cylinders and are easier to conceal.

    Best Concealed Carry Gun Reviews

    SIG Sauer P365 9mm Pistol

    SIG Sauer P365 9mm Pistol

    This concealed-carry gun has created plenty of buzz. The powerful magazine of the gun combined with its ultra-compact size makes the SIG Sauer P365 a great buy. The standout feature of the pistol is the double stack magazine which can accommodate 10 rounds and the capacity of the gun is almost double of similar model handguns in the same category, which provide only 6 rounds.

    The SIG Sauer P365 is lightweight, weighing just 17.6 oz and it has a 1-inch grip. The pistol is a striker-fired gun that is 5.8 inches long and it has a 3.1-inch barrel. The gun has an attractive black colored Nitron finish. The pistol ensures greater safety thanks to the no-trigger pull and 3-step takedown.

    The SIG Sauer P365’s proprietary rail is well suited for the lights and the other SIG Sauer accessories. The P365 features night sights and can accommodate an extended 12-round or 10-round magazine.


    Springfield Armory 911

    Springfield Armory 911

    If you’re on the lookout for a pistol that offers huge stopping power and a heavy round but also offers excellent concealability, then you could consider the Springfield Armory 911. The micro-size of the new 911 pistol offers easy concealability.

    The Springfield Armory 911 is an extremely lightweight pistol, weighing just 12.6 oz (empty) and delivers extreme impact. The 911 is very compact with a length of 5.5 inches and height of 3.9 inches. The black 911 has an anodized aluminum frame that is made from 7075 T6 billet and it has a slide made of stainless steel with a black nitride finish. The anodized finish of the gun adds to the durability of the weapon, making it more long lasting and it also has G10 grips that are textured.

    The 911 has other features such as ambidextrous thumb safety, indicator for a loaded chamber and a single-action trigger. It is equipped with Pro-Glo night sights which help to enhance both the front, as well as the rear sights. The gun has a yellow ring which helps you focus on your target in the daytime. The gun’s green tritium lights are extremely helpful for seeing your target in dark and dim light conditions. The Springfield Armory 911 comes along with 2 magazines made of stainless steel – an extended 7-round and 1 flush-fit 6-round magazine.


    Ruger Security 9

    Ruger Security 9

    Gun enthusiasts who love the crisp and clean single-action trigger of the Ruger LCPII can now experience the “Secure” trigger action in the latest concealed carry gun, the Ruger Security 9. The Ruger Security 9 was launched in late 2017 by Sturm, Ruger, & Co. and has gained quite a lot of popularity since then.

    The empty Ruger 9 weighs around 23.7 oz and has a 9mm caliber and the enhanced magazine enables you to carry 15 rounds. The handgun features an aluminum body that is precision machined, along with complete-length guide rails. The blue-finish barrel and slide are made from alloy steel and the grip frame of the gun is made of nylon which is glass filled. Although the Ruger 9 is a striker fired pistol, its internal hammer design ensures that the side is extremely easy to pull.

    The Ruger Security 9 has other features including a high-visibility and integrated accessory that can be adjusted for windage sights. The pistol is extremely easy to maintain and it does not need a trigger pull, which makes it very safe and does not require tools to dismantle the gun.

    The Security 9 has another important safety feature, i.e., the safety catch, which prevents the gun from accidentally firing and it will fire only when you pull the trigger. The gun has other safety features like manual thumb safety and trigger safety. There are 2 Security 9 gun models being launched – with a 15-round and 10-round magazine. The enhanced safety features of the Ruger Security 9 and the very affordable price tag, makes the Security 9 a great value-for-money buy.


    Walther Arms PPQ SC Sub-Compact Gun

    Walther Arms PPQ SC Sub-Compact Gun

    The smart design of the PPQ sub-compact gun with its short and fit-flush magazine makes it ideal for easy concealment. The gun offers 10 rounds of 9mm caliber.

    When empty, the PPQ SC weighs around 21.2 oz., its length is 6.6 inches and the gun’s barrel is 3.5 inches. A key feature of the handgun is its “Quick Defense” trigger which provides a 5-6 lbs trigger pull along with tactile reset when you require to fire quick shots as a follow up.

    The PPQ SC offers an extremely comfortable grip, which can be customized by using backstraps. The gun comes along with 3-dot target sights made of polymer. And, if you are looking for increased capacity, then you can opt for the extended magazine and the grip extension.

    The best part of the PPQ SC is that it can be used even by people who are left handed. The pistol has a magazine release button which is reversible and it also has an ambidextrous slide stop which makes it suitable whether you’re right handed or left handed.


    Taurus 1911 Commander

    Taurus 1911 Commander

    The 1911 Commander is the newest concealed carry gun that has been introduced by Taurus in 2018. The 1911 Commander is ideal for people looking for a concealed carry weapon that has a heavier feel.

    The 1911 is larger and heavier, weighing around 40 oz and it is 7.9 inches long, 1.3 inches wide and it has a 4.25 inches long barrel. The 1911 is a single-action pistol with an action that is hammer fired. The gun makes use of 8-round magazines instead of the 7-round magazines that are commonly used.

    The frame, barrel and slide of the pistol are made from carbon steel that makes the gun very durable and the matte finish gives it a very classy look. The gun has a black grip with a checkering pattern which helps you have a firm hold on the pistol. The 1911 Commander has Novak sights in the front part and at the rear that are adjustable and the pistol comes along with 2 magazines.

    The guns that we have discussed in our review are fairly new introductions in the market but have created quite a buzz. So, if you’re looking for a compact, concealed carry weapon, you could consider one of the options discussed above. And, once you actually buy your concealed carry gun, practice a lot with it, as practice is the key to employing your gun properly in self-defense situations.

    AR10 VS AR15 – Know The Difference Between Armalite Rifles

    AR10 vs AR15

    Not many people know that one of the most popular and talked-about rifles in the United States, the AR-15, was derived from the original AR-10, originally designed in the 1950s. Both rifles are the brainchild of celebrated gun designer Eugene Stoner. AR stands for ArmaLite, which later sold the designs for both guns to the Colt Manufacturing Company in 1959.

    Here, we will give you a quick explanation of what a rifle is, study both the rifles individually and then make a comparison of both the guns.

    What Is A Rifle?

    Quite simply, a gun fired from shoulder level, with spiral grooves in the barrel to make the bullet spin and as a result, have more accuracy over a large distance is a rifle. Rifles became more popular during the World War 1, simply because of their reliability, greater range and maneuverability, and the ease of use.

    Now that we have a basic idea of what a rifle is, we will move on to what exactly is an AR-10 or AR-15.

    How The AR-10 Came Into Being

    AR10

    Originally known as the “para-sniper”, the AR-10 (by the Fairchild Aircraft Company) was designed to be a lightweight, shorter than a traditional rifle, and easy to jump out with from say, an aeroplane in the early 1950s. The subdivision that manufactured the rifle became known as ArmaLite. But the company ran into trouble with funding and hence started focusing on prototypes, to be sold as designs to larger players.

    Around this time, George Sullivan — the founder — met Stoner, who went on to develop what we know now as the AR-10. The 7.62x51mm design was supposed to be a replacement for the M1 Garand, then used by the US military, but lost out to the Springfield M14 because it failed field torture tests.

    Undaunted, the duo continued research and development on a smaller caliber rifle.

    The AR-15 Is Born

    AR15

    Word was soon out that the M14 was no match to the AK-47, which had a much lighter ammunition (7.62x39mm), and Stoner was asked to design a rifle on a smaller calibre to combat this problem. The result was the AQR-15, which was chambered to fire .223/5.56mm rounds that were much lighter than the 7.76mm variants. But for some reasons, the AR-15 lost out again to the M14. Eventually, Sullivan sold rights to both the AR-10 and the AR-15 to Colt in 1959.

    Eventually, the military was ordered to adopt the AR-15 after full-scale tests in 1963, and the rifle was rechristened the M16. Despite some initial hiccups, the M16 went on not only to rival the AK47, but continues to be the design of choice for a lot of armies the world over.

    The Modern-Day AR-10

    Modern Day AR10

    Like the name suggests, the AR-10 is lightweight (7.25 lbs unloaded), gas operated, air-cooled rifle that fires a 7.62x51mm cartridge, but there are varieties of chambering available. The rifle is light because of its substantial use of aluminum alloy. The only exceptions would be the bolt, steel barrel, handguard, pistol grip, buttstock and bolt carrier.

    In overall length, the AR-10 measures 1.029 meters, with a barrel length of about 20 inches.

    Workings Of An AR-10

    The Firing Mechanism

    The propellant gas is bled to a port in the gun barrel and goes to a piston that runs parallel to the barrel. Because of the gas, the piston is pushed and enables the bolt to re-cock, extract the spent cartridge and insert a new one, making the gun ready to shoot again. Stoner’s design though has the gas bleeding through a cylinder that runs parallel with the barrel to affect the bolt carrier mechanism. As a result, the gun has a higher rate of fire ( 700 rounds/minute), and a muzzle velocity of 2,222 feet/ second.

    The excess gas is vent through holes on the side, making the rifle air cooled.

    The Receiver

    To reduce weight, the AR-10’s receiver is made from aluminum, and the bolt locks into the extension of the steel barrel. The pistol grip and the handguard are fibreglass, while the stock of the rifle is a composite reinforced fibreglass.

    The Sights

    The rear sight of the weapon is contained in a carrying handle, that protects the charging/cocking lever; the other sight is mounted high.

    The Modern-Day AR-15

    Modern Day AR15

    Just like the AR-10, the AR-15 is lightweight (around 5.5-8.5 lbs), and offers reduced recoil. Its ease of customization and conversion has made it one of the world’s most popular semi-automatic rifles. Similarly, the manufacturing makes heavy use of aluminum and synthetic polymers.

    The  AR-15 (in a 20-30 round capacity) uses a 5.56x45mm cartridge. Also, like the AR-10, the AR-15 is also available in a wide variety of chamberings. In overall length, the AR-15 measures 1.006 meters, with a barrel length of 0.508 meters (similar to the AR-10).

    Workings Of An AR-15

    The Firing Mechanism

    The AR-15 uses the “direct gas impingement” system used in the AR-15, with the only difference being the wide variety of calibers on offer. The operation gives the AR-15 a cyclic rate of fire of around 800 rounds per minute, with a muzzle velocity of about 3,200 feet per second.

    The Sights

    Like the AR-10, the rear sights of the weapon is on top of the receiver and a holder (used to carry the rifle like a suitcase) that protects the charging/cocking lever; and an elevated front sight.

    The Receiver

    Since there is a marked size difference between the calibers of the AR-10 and AR-15, the lower receivers are not interchangeable. The building materials used in the manufacture are the same, even though aluminum remains to be the most preferred. But because of the rifle’s customizability, gun enthusiasts experiment with a lot of other materials as well.

    Differences Between The AR-10 And AR-15

    Both the weapons are virtually identical when it comes to their appearance. The main difference between the two is the caliber, and as a result, more differences arise. These are barrel rifling, magazine capacity and ballistics.

    Caliber

    Though the AR-10’s 7.62mm rounds have longer maximum effective range, the smaller 5.56mm round of an AR-15 travels at a much higher speed. On the other hand, the bigger round has much more stopping power. While the much higher rate of fire of the AR-15 translates into much more hits and hence, is preferred by security personnel since one shot is what it mostly takes to accomplish the job in such situations, the AR-10 has many takers in the big game hunting and the sniper community.

    Still, the AR-15 is preferred by gun enthusiasts simply because of its easy access to ammunition and parts, lighter recoil, versatility and low maintenance compared with the AR-10.

    Availability

    The AR-15 is the more available of the two and is among the most popular rifles in most towns where guns are used. Even a simple online search will throw more results for the AR-15, and gun stores will have more variants, compared with the AR-10.

    Gun Size

    While collapsed, the AR-10 is 35.5 inches and 39.5 inches when extended. The AR-15, on the other hand, is 36.6 inches when extended and 33.3 inches when collapsed.

    Recoil

    With great power, well, comes great recoil. Even though the recoil on the AR-1o is significantly less than its counterparts, it is higher than the AR-15, simply because it uses a much powerful round, and therefore, produces much more force.

    Weight And Magazine

    Since the AR-10 fires a much powerful round, its internal workings need to be much stronger, and hence its overall weight stands at around 8.9 lbs fully loaded. The AR-15 is about 7 lbs, depending on the ammunition used. Also, because of the larger cartridge size, the magazine capacity is reduced in the AR-10 at around 25, as compared with the 30 round capacity of the AR-15.

    The weight difference may seem unimportant, given it is only a few grams, but eventually, it is the add-on accessories (standard and third party) that will ultimately make the difference.

    The AR-15’s magazine is more versatile too, when it comes to interchangeability from one type to another. On the other hand, the AR-10 is a bit rigid in the sense that it only accepts the AR-10 proprietary magazine.

    Comparison Table

    Product Name

    Image

    Details

    AR-10

    Modern Day AR10

    AR-10 is lightweight (7.25 lbs unloaded)

    Air-cooled rifle that fires a 7.62x51mm cartridge

    AR-10 measures 1.029 meters, with a barrel length of about 20 inches

    AR-15

    Modern Day AR15

    AR-15 is lightweight (around 5.5-8.5 lbs)

    AR-15 (in a 20-30 round capacity) uses a 5.56x45mm cartridge

    AR-15 measures 1.006 meters, with a barrel length of 0.508 meters (similar to the AR-10)

    Concluding Notes

    We have seen that there isn’t much difference between the AR-10 and AR-15, and that both are historically significant rifles. Now that the differences and similarities between the two have been listed above, it is clear that the main difference between them is the caliber. Both have the same accuracy at distances such as 400-600 yards.

    All said and done, there is virtually no difference between the two weapons when it comes to civilian applications. The looks of both guns can be changed in no time by simply replacing or adding the untold number of accessories such as combat grips, tactical rails, bipods and folding stocks that manufacturers have to offer.

    If you are into big game hunting and stopping power is what you are looking for, the AR-10 is a great gun. But if you are looking for a lightweight, reliable semi-automatic rifle with great accuracy, you should pick the AR-15, simply because of the number of accessories and ammunition available for it.

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    6.5 Creedmoor VS 308s: Ammo Comparisons And Review

    6.5 Creedmoor VS 308s

    If you are an ammunition enthusiast and keep reading about the various types of bullets and cartridges, you’ll be familiar with the ever going debate on which of the long-range rounds is better, the 6.5 Creedmoor or the .308 Winchester (or 208, as it is called). Some have also hailed the 6.5 Creedmoor as the new 308, considering the time of their respective launches and the performance.

    6.5 Creedmoor has gained immense popularity amongst the medium to long range target shooters, between 500 to 1000 yards. Both ammo, while having a similar base, differ quite well in their performance, mainly ballistic and recoil.

    Ahead, we’ll compare the 6.5 Creedmoor against the .308 Winchester and see whether it really is the upgrade you were looking for. Before that, let’s take a quick overview of both the ammo.

    308 Winchester: Overview

    308 winchester

    Launched in 1952, .308 has long been the preferred short-action ammo for target shooters and hunters. It is a rimless cartridge and was used to derive the 7.62x51mm NATO rifle, commercially. Therefore, it has been used by civilians as well as military agents alike.

    Due to its short case, the .308 Winchester became very popular with and suitable for the short action rifles.  If loaded with an expanding bullet, the round tears into the target and therefore, the 308s are ideally extensively used for hunting large targets as well, like a black bear, whitetail deer or even an elk. The 308 load has more drop at longer ranges, resulting in lower muzzle velocity.

    6.5 Creedmoor: Overview

    creedmoor

    The 6.5 Creedmoor is a newer launch, having released in 2007. However, it has taken over a lot of market share due to its high ballistic performance and lower recoil than other rounds. It is a centerfire rifle cartridge, with a length of 2.825 which can accommodate short-action bolt rifles as well as AR-10 semi-automatic ones.

    The 6.5 Creedmoor was designed for long-range target shooting and can deliver as further and beyond as 1,200 yards. It has also taken over the .308 Winchester in terms of being highly accurate in its aim. It also has a lesser recoil, making it a preferred choice over other long-range rounds among target shooters since lesser recoil means faster re-aiming.

    6.5 Creedmoor VS 308 Winchester

    6.5 Creedmoor VS 308

    6.5 Creedmoor is hailed as the upgraded version of the 308 Winchester, one that offers a lot more in the same domains. Even the parent cartridge of 6.5 Creedmoor was derived from the 308. 

    Let’s compare both these rounds in terms of their performance, availability, price and ballistics, and see which one comes out looking better.

    Ballistics Performance

    The 6.5 Creedmoor is sleeker and longer, making it ergonomically more aerodynamic. It can shoot as further as 1,000-1,200 yards, while the 308 is bounded to approximately 500 yards.

    The 6.5 Creedmoor propellants weigh 120 grains whose muzzle velocity after 500 yards is 2,078 feet per second, which is brilliant for long-range target shooting. The 308 uses bullets in the 150 grains weight range and the muzzle velocity drops to 1,963 feet per second after 500 yards.

    The difference between the two can be a huge deciding factor when it comes to precision shooting. They both start at a similar velocity, with 6.5 CM firing at 3,010 feet per second and the .308 Winchester firing at 3000 feet per second, but the .308 considerably slows down to the projectile weight and structure. The longer and thinner bullets of 6.5 CM allow it to keep its fast velocity stable over long distances.

    Cartridge Case

    6.5 Creedmoor has a substantially shorter case than the 308 Winchester. The case for 6.5 CM is derived from its parent cartridge, the .30 TC. The shorter case means a longer bullet, which is why it performs better in terms of ballistics.

    6.5 cartridge

    There is a difference in the sharpness of the shoulders of the two as well, which is why the recoil varies. The 6.5 Creedmoor has a 30 degrees shoulder angle as opposed to the 20 degrees of .308, making it sharper. The length of the shell casing of 6.5 CM bullet is 48.8mm.

    When used for longer periods, there is another difference that comes to light that brass in 6.5 Creedmoor lasts longer than the .308 Winchester, making it more durable.

    Available Ammo

    The bullets for the .308 Winchester weight about 150 grains, while those for 6.5 Creedmoor weigh 30 grains lighter at 120 grains. There is a huge variety available for both. The cost does not differ much, with the ammo for both at similar price levels.

    The bullet selection for .308 Winchester is essentially more than the 6.5 Creedmoor since it has been there for about 60 years, but the performance of the projectiles used by the latter is a lot better, having better ballistic caliber and more speed. They have a lower drop. The 6.5 Creedmoor bullets also have a better density which results in higher penetration into the target. For the 6.5 Creedmoor, a bullet weighing 140 grains has a higher caliber of .526 and a velocity of 2710 feet per second, which is more than what .308 has to offer.

    Some bullets available for the 6.5 Creedmoor are Hornady ELD Match 120 grains, 147 grains; Nosler Match Grade Custom Bullet Tip 140gr; Nosler Ballistic Tip 140gr, etc.

    The .308 Winchester uses Federal Fusion Ammo 165 grains, Fiocchi Barnes TTSX Load 168 grains, Federal Premium Vital-Shok 165 grains, and a whole lot more choices.

    With most brands, the ammo for the .308 Winchester is cheaper and more readily available than the 6.5 Creedmoor.

    Recoil And Lifespan

    The 6.5 Creedmoor definitely sees a lesser recoil due to the lighter weight of the bullets used. This makes the shooting considerably easier and takes lesser time in reacquiring the target, which is why it is preferred by the target-shooter and becoming more popular with the hunters as well.

    The barrel lifespan is more for the .308 Winchester. Due to a smaller bore of the 6.5 CM and the fact that it has a higher firing velocity, the barrel life is a little shorter than its rival.

    308 barrel

    Rifles Available

    As with the ammo, the rifles for 6.5 Creedmoor are not very easily available due to its recency in the launch. On the other hand, there is a huge availability of all short-action rifles style you’d want for the .308 Winchester. For example, if you take Savage rifles, they have about 10 models suitable for the 6.5 CM while a whopping 36 for the .308 Winchester.

    Also, the 6.5 Creedmoor being a dominantly long-range round, the rifles available are a little difficult to find because they are all precision, high-quality rifles, which cost more and have a specific use. Still, in the current market, the precision rifles for the .308 are a lot more easy and widely available than for the 6.5 CM.

    There are some precision rifles that do are apt for both cartridges, for instance, the Ruger Precision Rifle. It is also a beginners rifle for long-range shooting, so the fact that it caters to 6.5 Creedmoor should really punch up its popularity further.

    Pricing

    There isn’t a lot of difference between the pricing of 6.5 Creedmoor and the 308s. However, on an average, a round of 308s will cost about 10 cents less than a round of 6.5 Creedmoor.

    For example, with the Federal Premium Gold Medal Berger, a round of .308 Winchester costs $1.47 while a round of 6.5 Creedmoor costs $1.57. On the other hand, the Hornady American Whitetail ammo costs the same for both, priced at $1.07/round. However, the 6.5 Creedmoor is made by Hornady, therefore, any ammunition that comes from the brand is bound to be cheaper for the CM.

    PRODUCT

    IMAGE

    RATING

    PRICE

    308 Winchester

    308 winchester

    6.5 Creedmoor

    creedmoor

    The Conclusion

    The main difference between the 308s and the 6.5 Creedmoor lies in the range delivered and the precision. The 6.5 Creedmoor has a longer range and better accuracy, in short, a better ballistic performance. For long-range target shooter, the high velocity due to the aerodynamic build of the cartridge does a better job.

    The .308 Winchester is, however, more deadly when it comes to tearing the target down and has a longer barrel life. The ammo is widely and more readily available and there is a wider selection of rifles built for it. The bullet is more deadly and does more damage as well due to wider diameter. It falls short when it comes to long-range shooting when compared with the 6.5 Creedmoor due to heavier bullets and the structure.

    If you are looking for a round to target anywhere within 500 yards and have a restricting budget, .308 Winchester should be your go-to choice.

    For anyone looking at precision shooting at a range longer than 500 yards, 6.5 Creedmoor is a clear choice. It is definitely a little more expensive considering it’s still in its nascent stage of popularity, but the accuracy and the performance offered surpasses the long-standing reliability of .308 Winchester.

    9mm VS 45: What Is The Difference Between The Two?

    9mm vs 45 Ammo Comparisons


    Choosing your gun is amongst one of the most crucial decisions you make in your life. Usually, depending upon the intended purpose of the weapon, common considerations that guide a gun buying decision include its size, shooting range, ease of firing, sound produced on firing, weight and the cost. For instance, if you need the gun for your safety and protection at home, then you might be okay with a big gun like a shotgun or a rifle as long as it comfortable to fire. If you intend to carry the firearm on your person then you would want it to be compact and easy to conceal.

    However, another important factor that can influence your decision is the kind of cartridge the gun uses and what will you need. There are many different kinds of ammo. So many that a first-time buyer can get thoroughly confused. For the sake of dialing down the confusion, we are only going to pitt a 9mm vs 45 in this article.

    What Is A Cartridge?

    Commonly confused with a bullet, a cartridge or ammo actually has these components:

  • A bullet which is the actual part of the cartridge that impacts the target.
  • A casing which holds the primer and powder and makes the shell of the cartridge.
  • A primer which helps ignite the powder.
  • A powder that explodes.
  • At the bottom of the cartridge is the primer. It is a chemical compound which is struck by the firing pin at the base of the cartridge when the gun’s trigger is pulled. This creates a spark and ignites the powder. The powder catches fire and explodes. This explosion creates a large amount of pressure that throws the bullet out of the cartridge and ultimately out of the barrel of the gun resulting in the weapon firing.

    The empty cartridge needs to be removed from the weapon to make room for the next cartridge to be fired. Some weapons do this automatically while some need to be emptied manually.

    How Does Ammo Differ?

    gun ammo


    If it is your first experience with owning a gun, the sea of options in ammo can make it very difficult to choose the right ammo for you. But there are two broad differences that can help you out.

    The first is whether you want a rimfire or a centerfire ammo. In the centerfire cartridges, you’ll be able to see the primer in the center of the base of the bullet. If the base of the cartridges is flat with no primer in the center, it is a rimfire ammo.

    It just means that firing pin will hit the center in the case of centerfire ammo and it will hit the rim in case of the rimfire ammo. Though, the rimfire bullets are much cheaper, you will usually find them only small caliber.

    This brings us to the second big difference - the size of the ammo. There are many different sizes of cartridges - 9mm, .40 S&W, 45 ACP, 12 Ga, .50 BMG and the list goes on.


    Why Size Matters

    Ammo contributes significantly to the choice of gun you make because of its size. Guns that use larger cartridges have more stopping power - that means a greater impact on the target. At the same time, they are slow to fire continuously because of the higher recoil. Their size may also decrease the magazine capacity, which we will talk about later, and their follow up shots are also limited.

    Guns with smaller cartridges offer the advantage of fast follow up shots and more room for multiple shots. Also, their stopping power is less, which is safer for first time users.

    As promised, let us understand and compare the 9mm and 45 to help you understand which one is the cartridge for you so you can choose the right gun for yourself.


    History

    Both, the 9mm and 45 go back to the beginning of the 20th century.

    Actually named the 9x19 Parabellum, the 9mm was designed by George Luger way back in 1901 and went into production a year later. It was adopted by the German Navy and German Army in the years 1904 and 1906, respectively. It was also used by the German forces in World War 1.

    In the year 1904, John Browning developed the .45, commonly called the 45. Many countries including the United States used it during the World War 1.

    Both cartridges have been popular amongst the worlds’ armed forces since then.

    This is pretty much where the similarities between the two cartridges end. Both are so popular with patrons rooting for them equally that besides a few common factors it is always the 9mm vs 45.

     

    9mm vs 45 man firing a gun

    9mm VS 45: What’s The Difference?

    Let’s get to the why these cartridges are so different.

    Origin

    The 45 was made in the United States of America while the 9mm was made in Germany.

    Diameters

    • Bullet Diameter: The bullet diameter, also known as the caliber, determines the whole it makes in the target. The 9mm as the name suggests has a diameter of 9.01 mm whereas the .45 has a diameter of .452 inches or 11.01 mm. You will often find guns being named in a caliber. That is because of the diameter of the gun’s barrel and hence, of the cartridge.
    • Base Diameter: The 9mm has a base diameter of 9.93 mm, while the 45 has one of 12.1 mm.
    • Neck Diameter: The 9mm has a base diameter of 9.96 mm, while the 45 has one of 12.2 mm.

    Case Type

    There have been no significant findings to prove the effect of casing design on a bullet’s velocity or ballistics. Yet, some manufactures claim that their design makes a difference. In case of the 9mm, you’ll find the casing to be tapered while the 45 has a straight one.

    Case Length

    The case length can affect how far inside a bullet is seated in the cartridge.

    You will find a case length of .898 inches in a 45 and of .754 inches in a 9mm cartridge.

    Expansion

    The 9mm expands .36” to .72” while the 45 expands .45” to .79”.

    Length Of The Cartridge

    A cartridge length should be able to accomodate the following:

    • The neck should be long enough to give the cartridge a comfortable seating and enough hold.
    • The cartridge should not be too big for the gun’s magazine.

    The 9mm ammo is 19.15mm long while the 45 is 32.4mm long.

    Pressure

    The pressure is one of the contributors to how far and how fast the bullet is projected from the cartridge and gun. The 9mm has a maximum pressure of 34,084 psi, while the 45 has maximum pressure of  21,000 psi.

    Velocity

    A high speed cartridge is always better. Hence, with a velocity range of 95-1400 FPS, the 9mm beats the 45 which travels in a range of 700-1150 FPS.

    Energy

    The 9mm carries an energy of 115 grains: 323 foot-pounds which is much lower than the 185 grains: 411 foot pounds of the 45.

    Momentum

    Ballistic experts have maintained that the momentum is a good measure of the bullet’s performance. In that case the 9mm falls short of momentum by a large gap against the 45.

    Primer

    The 45 uses the same primer as large rifles while the 9mm uses the Berdan or Boxer primer for small pistols. The Berdan primer is mostly used by militaries though it is reusable, it is a difficult process as the primer cup is attached to the casing itself. While the boxer primer is most popular is the United States due to its ease of replacement.

    Penetration

    The deeper a bullet penetrates, the more damage it causes to the target. The 45 gives a bullet penetration of 11.3” to 14.3” as compared to the 9mm’s 8” to 15.9” penetration.

    Capacity Of The Magazine

    The 9mm cartridges are smaller than the 45. Hence, magazines can hold more of the 9mm. However, the capacity may vary depending upon which gun is being used. Usually, a magazine shipped from the factory can carry 6-14 cartridges in case of 45s and 6-20 cartridges in case of the 9mms.

    Recoil

    man pointing a gun

    Recoil refers to the force with which a firearm recoils when it is fired without support from behind. It impacts the user and can even cause serious injury. The 9mm cartridge has a lower recoil than the 45 ammo. The latter is known to push the firearm user’s hands backward on firing.

    Cost

    A 9mm cartridge is much cheaper than the 45.

    Happy Choosing

    There you are! Now you know pretty much everything you need to know to choose the right cartridge for you. The 9mm trumps the 45 in aspects such as cost, easy to replace primer, more magazine capacity and lower recoil, the 45 seems to be made to get the job done with its higher penetration, momentum and energy.

    You can now weigh the pros and cons of both the cartridges to decide what works best for you.

     

    Sources:

    Diffen

    Pew Pew Tactical

    Gun Digest

    Hunter Ed

    Mass Reloading

    Review, History, And Features Of The AK-47 Draco Guns

    Who hasn’t heard of the “infamous” AK-47? This is one weapon everyone is aware of and the popularity of the Avtomat Kalashnikova or commonly known as the AK-47 is due to the fact that it is one of the most reliable rifles in the world. The AK-47 is an extremely well-made rifle and is easy to use and maintain. The rifle is chambered in the powerful 7.62x39mm round. There are many variations of the AK-47 that have been developed over the years.

    In our review, we will be essentially looking at the miniature version of the AK-47 rifle i.e. the AK-47 Draco Pistol. The Draco pistol is manufactured in Romania and is imported by Century Arms. The Draco is produced in the same factory that makes Romanian military rifles.

    AK-47 Draco

    History Of The AK-47

    The AK-47 is undoubtedly the most iconic and most manufactured weapon in history. The unique curved magazine of the AK-47 and its grip are recognized the world over. The name AK-47 originated from the Russian “Avtomat Kalashnikova” and the name was in honor of the main designer of the firearm, Mikhail Kalashnikov and the automatic firing abilities of the weapon and the 47 essentially denotes the year 1947, when the trials for the rifle began, which was finally approved for use by the armed forces of the Soviet Union.

    The AK-47 is indeed the most successful, as well as, popular assault rifles in history and there is no comparison in terms of the number of guns manufactured, worldwide deployment of the weapon and service duration.

    The AK-47 is not a completely original design and is actually a union of the design concepts from several pre-existing weapons. The design of the gas-driven mechanism, the trigger system, rotating bolt and safety catch of the AK-47 were all borrowed from weapons that already existed. However, all these features were merged to develop the AK-47 rifle which offered fantastic durability, ruggedness and low production costs.

    And, the result of this was the production of an extremely lightweight firearm that had a moderate recoil and which was easy to handle and control yet placed quite a lot of power in the hands of the shooter. The accuracy of the rifle was a secondary factor and it was the power and ability to deliver firepower in an effective manner, which made the AK-47 unlike any other rifle produced before.

    Features Of The Draco Pistol

    The Draco is equipped with a barrel that is 12.25 inches long and the barrel sports wooden furniture and a very short sight radius. However, the pistol features an SB Tactical Brace.

    How The Draco Performs On The Range

    The Draco is quite a “hottie” when it comes to its performance on the range. The 12.25-inch barrel is capable of producing quite a huge muzzle blast and flash and without the muzzle device, the pistol actually roars.

    The 7.62x39mm round of the pistol does not suffer massively in terms of the performance due to the short barrel of the pistol. In reality, it only loses around 200 FPS due to the short barrel and is more capable ballistically compared to the other short barreled rifles such as the 5.56 rifles.

    Since the 7.62x39mm round is designed for use at a distance of 300m or lesser, it may be quite difficult to hit long range targets with the Draco pistol, which has a short sight radius. However, the Draco is powerful when used within its effective range. The potency of the pistol at close quarters and the short size of the weapon makes the Draco excellent for home defense.

    The recoil of the Draco is minimal, especially if it is braced properly against your arm or shoulder. The pistol is easy to control and you can shoot with ease. You may experience some muzzle rise while shooting with the pistol; however, this is controllable and using a muzzle device can help to control the rise.

    Ergonomics

    The Draco pistol has the charging handle located on the right side and if you master the technique, you can charge the gun with your left hand too. The magazine release is an ambidextrous paddle that is located behind the magazine. You need practice to use it properly for speed and tactical reloads. However, the worst aspect of the weapon is its safety, which is quite difficult to master and not intuitive as you would find in the AR-15 or any type of western rifle. The Draco pistol is quite easy to handle with the SB Tactical Brace. The pistol is short, compact, lightweight and extremely simple to maneuver, control and fire. However, without the brace, the pistol can be quite heavy and clumsy to handle and difficult to fire with accurately.

    Reliability

    In terms of the reliability, the Draco is very reliable. Even if you do not clean it for thousands of rounds, the pistol works pretty efficiently. And you just need to pull the trigger lightly for the pistol to go off.

    Purpose

    The Draco is exceptionally short, which makes it very easy to use, especially at close quarters. The pistol is the perfect length if you are using it inside your home. You can control the pistol very well and use the sights if you have an SB Tactical Brace for the gun and you can brace it. The round of the pistol is quite large and when it is fed from a 30-round magazine, it will give you sufficient power to shoot.

    AK Pistol Variants

    Over the years, with SBRs (short-barreled rifles) becoming quite popular, so have AK-type pistols. The Romanian Draco, the Mini Draco and the Serbian PAP M92 are among the most popular AK pistol variants in the market. And, depending on the import market and if they include a brace, the AK pistols cost anywhere in the range of $525- $600. All the AK pistol variants have stamped receivers and are chambered in 7.62x39mm magazines.

    The Serbian PAP M92 is imported current and makes use of the Yugo-patterned handguards and sports 26 × 1.5 mm muzzle threads. The Draco pistols make use of standard AKM-patterned handguards, while the Mini Draco features the single-piece proprietary handguard. Both the Romanian, as well as the Mini Draco have 14 x 1 mm muzzle thread, which is covered by a muzzle cap that is welded shut.

    The Serbian PAP M92 has a barrel that is 10” long, the Romanian Draco has an 11.75” long barrel and the Mini Draco has a 7.75” barrel. While the barrel of the Dracos is lined with chrome, the Serbian PAP M92’s barrel is not chrome lined. Both the Draco variants are cut-down versions of the AKM, while the PAP M92 is similar to AKS-74U type weapon, which also known as Krinkov.

    AK pistols do not have the same restrictions under 922(r) like rifles as they mainly comprise components which are completely foreign-made.

    Over the years, with SBRs (short-barreled rifles) becoming quite popular, so have AK-type pistols. The Romanian Draco, the Mini Draco and the Serbian PAP M92 are among the most popular AK pistol variants in the market. And, depending on the import market and if they include a brace, the AK pistols cost anywhere in the range of $525- $600. All the AK pistol variants have stamped receivers and are chambered in 7.62x39mm magazines.

    The Serbian PAP M92 is imported current and makes use of the Yugo-patterned handguards and sports 26 × 1.5 mm muzzle threads. The Draco pistols make use of standard AKM-patterned handguards, while the Mini Draco features the single-piece proprietary handguard. Both the Romanian, as well as the Mini Draco have 14 x 1 mm muzzle thread, which is covered by a muzzle cap that is welded shut.

    The Serbian PAP M92 has a barrel that is 10” long, the Romanian Draco has an 11.75” long barrel and the Mini Draco has a 7.75” barrel. While the barrel of the Dracos is lined with chrome, the Serbian PAP M92’s barrel is not chrome lined. Both the Draco variants are cut-down versions of the AKM, while the PAP M92 is similar to AKS-74U type weapon, which also known as Krinkov.

    AK pistols do not have the same restrictions under 922(r) like rifles as they mainly comprise components which are completely foreign-made.

    Mini Draco Pistol Review

    Features Of The Mini Draco Pistol

    The Mini Draco pistol as we know is based on the design of the AK-47 rifle. Chambered in 7.62x39mm, the pistol is ideal for very specific purposes such as residential or static purposes or as a weapon for personal defense that engages the target at a close distance. The pistol has an 18-inch barrel, which makes it moderately compact compared to other pistols chambered in larger calibers.  

    The Draco Mini accommodates all types of magazines that can be used with AK-47 rifles. The pistol features a Midwest Industries rail which is made especially for the Draco Mini. The rail has circular divots and 4 rails which are positioned around every assembly plane and the assembly is pretty simple.

    The rail has a Bushnell Red Dot optic which is reliable and rugged and maintains battery life and offers 11 dim settings. The pistol has a 6-MOA hold (1.5-inches at 25 yards); however, for the purpose of close-range defense, the pistol offers excellent near to mid-range coverage. The sight radius of the Mini Draco’s iron sights are around 6-inches and the rear sight is located toward the forward aft of the pistol, adding around 10-inches to the “eyeball rear sight” distance.

    The Mini Draco is equipped with a Medieval flash suppressor from Troy Industries and though the fireball is significant, the pistol reduces the optic signature of the flash considerably. The pistol has a standard rubberized Hogue grip which helps to reduce the recoil and also better control of the weapon, especially when you’re shooting in various stances.

    The internal parts of the Mini Draco are very similar to the AK-47; however, the pistol has a composite block behind the bolt assembly. Since the gas rod of the Mini Draco is much shorter than the AK-47, the bolt group does not need the same recoil distance as the AK.

    Pros And Cons Of The Mini Draco Pistol

    PROS

    CONS

    • Versatile
    • Compact
    • Reliable
    • Has a powerful caliber
    • Can be modified easily
    • Sufficiently accurate
    • Quite expensive

    • Dependent on the composite block

    • Requires specific after-market parts

    Romanian Draco Review

    Features Of The Romanian Draco

    Romanian Draco Pistol

    The Romanian Draco is a legal variant of the legendary AK-47 rifle created by Mikhail Kalashnikov and is targeted to the civilians. The weapon basically is a truncated version of the AK rifle and the original objective of the firearm is to bring in the heavy-weight firepower to any fight in a smaller package. The Romanian Draco is ideal for paratroopers, Spetsnaz fighters and tanker who require greater power in a more compact sized weapon.

    The Romanian Draco features an 11.75-inch barrel that has a muzzle nut which is welded on and a Hogue stock. The weapon is different compared to the AK-47 rifles as it does not have a stock that folds, instead of the 5.45×39mm chambering, the weapon is chambered in 7.362×39mm and it is a semi-automatic weapon.

    Originally, the Krinkov carbines were AK-47 pattern rifles that were shortened and the Romanian Draco is an AKM pattern weapon and has a legal classification as a handgun. So, when you make modifications to the Romanian Draco, you must be careful and follow the recommended parameters for modification.

    The Romanian Draco uses the 7.62x39mm cartridge, which is essentially round fire projectiles of 100 grains – 155 grains with velocities between 1,700 feet/sec to around 3,000 feet/sec depending on the load and bullet weight.

    The Romanian Draco needs a fair amount of training and practice to get used to and you may initially find the recoil pretty harsh, which may be due to the fact that the gun has a short barrel and no stock. Overall, the Romanian Draco offers a great feeling when you are shooting with it. As far as a compact weapon goes, the Romanian Draco is very versatile and handy.

    Pros And Cons Of The Romanian Draco

    PROS

    CONS

    • There is plenty of firepower that you get for the small, compact gun.
    • It is quite light in weight.
    • The gun is short and handy at a close shooting range.
    • The short barrel of the gun and lack of a stock make the Romanian Draco quite difficult to control, especially in the situation of rapid fire. These factors also make the gun less accurate.

    • May not be reliable.

    The Draco is a great fun gun and is ideal for the purposes of home defense. Although the gun is quite loud, it is an excellent gun to shoot with and defend yourself. And, at the end of the day, it is as close you can get to an AK and who wouldn’t want to own one!

    Colt 1911 Review

    Colt Model of 1911 U.S. Army

    The Colt 1911 semi-automatic pistol was created by the legendary gun maker John Browning and the gun was adopted by the U.S. Army as the standard firearm. Over a century has gone by and the same gun is still being used by the U.S. Military and has gone on to become a firm favorite with law and security enforcement officers and citizens. The Colt 1911 is one of the most iconic pistols of all times and the timeless design of 1911 is likely to live on.

    The original Colt 1911 handgun was built using the .45 ACP cartridge; however, later the design was adapted so that the gun could accommodate different types of rounds like the .40 Smith & Wesson, 9mm, 10mm, .38 Super and the .357 Magnum. Today, although there are several models, manufacturers, and sizes of the 1911, the Colt remains the gold standard.



    Colt 1911  
    Pros & Cons

    PROS

     Accuracy

     Trigger

      Slim Design and Ergonomics

      ​Power

      ​Disassembly and Reloading

      ​Reliability and Durability

      ​Customization


     

    CONS

    x  Manual slide safety lock and a grip



     



    Colt 1911

    Colt Model of 1911 U.S. Army

    Image CC4 SamLisker via Wikimedia


    Pluses of the 1911 Platform

    So, the question is, what really makes the 1911 a firm favorite of shooters? In reality, there are several factors that make the 1911 a great weapon.

    Accuracy

    The fixed barrel design, long sight radius, light trigger, and soft recoil make the 1911 quite an accurate gun. The moderate recoil and the natural aim make the Colt 1911 fairly accurate in the right hands.

    Trigger

    The 1911 is mostly a single-action pistol with some exceptions. The trigger of the Colt 1911 makes it a dream to shoot with. The trigger offers a light pull, a clean break and a fairly short reset. However, the trigger pull being so light makes it rather unsafe to carry the 1911 pistol chambered without the safety. Nevertheless, the light trigger makes the 1911 excellent for competitions, tactical training and target practice.

    Slim Design and Ergonomics

    The 1911 is a slim and sleek gun with excellent ergonomics. This makes it easier for shooters with smaller hands to grip and handle comfortably. The slim design also makes the pistol ideal for conceal carry, especially for purpose of self-defense.

    Recoil

    You may feel a bit of the recoil, although it is not very harsh and the Colt 1911 manages the recoil quite well due to its heavy weight. And, if you use a smaller round such as a 9mm, then the recoil is even lesser.

    Ease of Concealment

    The 1911 is quite heavy and big in size. However, due to its single-stack magazine, the handgun is quite slim, which makes it ideal for conceal carry and if you opt for a short barrel version like the Defender, Commander, etc., then it makes conceal carry much easier.

    Power

    Most 1911 models are chambered to use .45 ACP caliber ammunition, which is fairly powerful. The Colt 1911 is also available in 9mm and .22 LR calibers.

    Disassembly and Reloading

    Reloading the 1911 is quite simple. All you need to do is, press the button of the magazine release and the empty magazine will be dropped and you can slide a loaded magazine in place.

    The disassembly of the 1911 may, however, be a challenge for a beginner, as it is not very intuitive. However, with repeated practice, it will become much easier. You may want to keep the manual of the pistol handy for the first few times that you disassemble the gun and there are also several YouTube videos that can help you to disassemble the 1911.

    Reliability and Durability

    While the reliability of the 1911 may be a bit lacking and it is also sensitive to various kinds of ammunition, the newer models are much more reliable compared to the older versions. The 1911 is a great pistol for self-defense and the reliability of the handgun can be enhanced by a bit of customization.

    Customization

    The 1911 is among the most customizable guns and you can customize it as much as you require to. You can find accessories, add-ons, parts and spare magazines for your Colt 1911 quite easily as compared to other guns.

    While the 1911 has many pluses, it has its limitations too. The disassembly process is quite complicated than other pistols. It is fairly heavy and can hold only 7 to 8 rounds and requires at least 200-300 rounds before a 1911 starts functioning properly and is reliable. Nevertheless, the 1911 is the most popular pistol designs and is an excellent option for professional shooting competitions, as a range gun, as an SHTF sidearm and as a gun for home defense.

    Factors to Consider before Choosing the Right 1911

    If you have decided that you’re going to buy a Colt 1911, here are a few factors you should consider before you actually go out and buy one.

    Size

    There are essentially 3 basic sizes in which the 1911 is available i.e. Full Size, which is also known as Government, the Officer Size and the Commander Size.

    1. Full Size or Government Size: This is the original size and the most popular one. The pistol has a full-size frame and grip and the barrel is 5 inches. This offers excellent recoil control and balance and the 5-inch barrel offers enhanced accuracy.
    2. Commander Size: This is smaller than the Full-Size pistol. The pistol has a full-size frame but a 4-inch barrel and a shorter slide. This is a comfortable pistol which is easy to handle and is suitable for all types of applications.
    3. Officer Size: This is the smallest size with a small frame and grip and a 3” or 3.5” barrel. The small and compact size makes it ideal for concealed carry; however, it may not offer as much accuracy as the larger models.

    Caliber

    The caliber of the pistol is a very important factor to consider. You need to decide whether you need a .45 Auto which is tried and tested or if you need a caliber for higher velocity or you need something that offers a big kick suited for hunting.

    Safety

    All models have a manual slide safety lock and a grip safety to ensure that the gun is safe until it is fired. The Series 80 guns have extra protection in case the gun is dropped or the other safeties do not work. The Colt 1911 has 2 types of manual safety – standard and ambidextrous. The grip safety comprises a beavertail that helps to protect your hand from being hurt by the hammer spur and allows you to shoot comfortably.

    Sights

    The original version of the 1911 had a simple GI style sight without dots or any other aids for aiming. However, the sights have improved significantly over time and there are many types available. The 3-Dot sights are very common offering clarity and accuracy. Night sights usually contain glowing material in glass vials, also in the 3-Dot arrangement, which is best for home defense and concealed carry weapons. Some models also have rear sights which can be adjusted and are ideal for competition and target shooting.

    Light Rail

    The standard 1911 pistol does not feature a light rail, but it is available in some of the full-size and some Commander models. If you’re using your 1911 for home defense or law enforcement, then you should buy a pistol with a high-quality light and a light rail.

    Colt 1911 Models

    For a very long time, Colt was one of the very few manufacturers of the 1911 and so, there was not much competition. However now, the scenario has changed and almost every gun manufacturer has a 1911 model. Today, Colt offers several variants of the 1911. Let us look at the various Colt 1911 models.

    Colt 1991

    Developed in the year 1991, the Colt 1991 resembles the original M1911 closely, which was used in the WWI. The 1991 enables the shooters to own a traditional 1911 pistol that has been upgraded with some modern-day features. The Colt 1991 makes use of the Series 80 firing mechanism, beavertail grip, spur hammer and a solid trigger.

    The handgun features a flattened mainspring and a long trigger. On the left side, it has a regular GI style thumb safety and a grip safety that has been shortened. The 1991 features GI style fixed sights with white dots for accurate shooting. The pistol is available in a polished blue or a stainless-steel finish.

    Colt Combat Commander

    The latest model of the esteemed Colt Combat Commander is equipped with G10 grips, the beavertail grip safety and a spring recoil mechanism that is very durable, which reduces the recoil significantly. The 4.25-inch long barrel of the gun makes it ideal for conceal carry compared to the full-size gun. The Commander features a blued frame and slide, while the barrel is made of stainless steel. The gun has a classic Commander-style hammer and the pistol is available both in 9mm, as well as, .45 ACP calibers.

    Colt Combat Unit Rail Gun

    The combat rail gun model of the Colt 1911 has been designed for combat and tactical purposes. The Combat Unit Rail is equipped with a rail. The gun also sports the dual spring recoil mechanism like the Colt Combat Commander. It also has a beavertail safety grip, Novak night sights and a trigger guard which is undercut.

    The Combat Unit Rail is equipped with a 1913 Picatinny rail which allows you to attach lasers or lights to the pistol, making it perfect for the purpose of home defense. The front strap of the gun has a checkering that offers enhanced grip in slippery conditions. The gun has extended controls, national match barrel, low glare finish and slide serrations on the front and also the rear. The Combat Unit Rail is available in 9mm and .45 Auto calibers.

    Colt Competition

    The Gold Cup model was introduced by Colt, way back in the 50s as a premium target pistol and was considered as the gold standard 1911 for use in competitions. The Colt Competition 1911 was unveiled recently by Colt. The Colt Competition is available in various calibers, .38 Super, .45 ACP and 9mm and the pistol comes in 2 finishes – matte bluing and stainless steel.

    The pistol features the Series 70 firing system that makes the trigger pull very light. The blue-colored G10 grips, dual recoil spring mechanism, beavertail safety grip, Novak fiber optics sights and all the features of the Colt Competition make it an excellent pistol.

    Colt Defender

    If you are on the lookout for a 1911 pistol which is of a smaller size compared to the Colt Commander, then the Defender can be an ideal choice. With a 3-inch barrel, the Colt Defender has a shorter grip that can accommodate a magazine with a capacity of 6+1 rounds, although it can also accommodate larger 1911 magazines which will extend from the bottom of the pistol.

    The Colt Defender has a beavertail safety grip and Novak sights and comes in both stainless steel, as well as blued finishes. The pistol is available in 9mm and .45 ACP calibers.

    Colt Delta Elite

    This is a classic 10mm gun belonging to the 1911 series and the pistol is also available in a version with a rail that enables you to attach accessories. They equip both the Colt Delta Elite versions with Novak sights with white dots, an improved hammer, slide serrations offering enhanced grip, extended thumb safety, a flared and lowered ejection port which enables smooth cycling and an extended beavertail grip safety. Both the models have a 5-inch barrel and they made them from stainless-steel. They blackened the grips of the pistol and sport the Delta medallion.

    Colt Gold Cup Trophy

    As we already know, the Colt Gold Cup was produced way back in 1950 and was regarded as the smoothest and finest competition pistols ever manufactured. The Gold Cup Trophy is the latest version of the original pistol.

    In addition, the Gold Cup Trophy features a magazine well that is extended, a fiber optic front sight and a rear sight which is completely adjustable. The Gold Cup Trophy has a National Match barrel, an adjustable trigger and front and back straps with 25 LPI checkering. The pistol is available in 9mm and .45 Auto calibers and is an extremely high-quality pistol perfect for competitions.

    Colt M45A1 CQBP

    The Colt M45A1 CQBP was first used by the Marine Corps in 2012. It is essentially a Rail Gun but has a tan coating which makes it resistant to corrosion. They equip the Colt M45A1 CQBP with a 1913 Picatinny rail, G10 grips, Novak tritium night sights and dual recoil spring mechanism.

    Colt Series 70

    Also known as the Mark IV Series 70, the Colt Series 70 pistol makes use of the Series 70 firing mechanism. The exterior of the gun resembles the design of the M1911A1. The used the classic gun in the war right from the WWII to Vietnam.

    The Colt Series 70 has a much shorter trigger, a standard thumb safety and grip, basic sights and an arched housing for the mainspring. They discontinued the stainless-steel version of the Series 70 gun very recently; however, they are still producing the bled version.

    For Self-defense

    They consider the 1911 as a classic and used by the U.S. Military for several decades. The pistol has excellent ergonomics and it is available in many different calibers. However, to make it more reliable and useful for the purpose of self-defense, you may have to make some enhancements to the existing model, which may drive its price higher than it is. Nevertheless, the 1911 is a good gun to own.

    Colt has been manufacturing the 1911 much longer than any other firearm producer and has introduced several variants you can choose from. With the numerous choices available in the market, deciding on the one that is best for you may be quite a difficult task. We hope that our review has helped you understand the different Colt 1911 models available and help you in choosing your perfect gun.

    QUALITY

    PRICE

    RATING

    GREAT

    $$

    4/5

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    Glock 40 Review

    glock 40 features glock 23 pistol A lightweight weapon with the amazing 15-rounds capacity

    If you go out in the gun market, you’ll find people swearing by their Glocks. And why shouldn’t they? This unconventional underdog somehow managed to shatter all perceptions about guns. Especially ones pertaining to the construction and aesthetics of handguns. And should they own a Glock 40, their pride knows no bounds.

    Yes, you are right, we are talking about the plastic frame with no hammer and no safety!

    From when its story began way back in February 1980, the Glock has reigned the handgun market through its impressive design, constant innovation, and an at-par performance.

    Glock 40

    Pros & Cons

    glock 40 features glock 23 pistol A lightweight weapon with the amazing 15-rounds capacity

    Featured Image CC4 Canon67 via Wikimedia

    PROS

    CONS

    • Both strong and light at the same time
    • Combination of plastic and steel allowed the gun to weigh only twenty-three ounces
    • Reliable and easy to use
    • Average style

    So, How Did It Come About?

    Believe it or not, the Glock handguns happened due to a bit of accidental eavesdropping by Gaston Glock. Post the World War II era the Austrian Army was looking to replace the Walther P-38 guns with something different. Glock, an Austrian citizen happened to overhear this conversation between two Austrian Army colonels.

    Armed with this information, he went to the Minister of Defence and asked if his business could also offer a solution. Receiving an affirmative answer, Glock got down to business. But he knew nothing about guns. He owned a small business that produced field knives and blades for his country’s army. The closest he had been to the battlefield was when he served a few days as a conscript teenager in Wehrmacht during World War II. And that did nothing to teach him anything about guns, leave alone designing them for the benefit of an army.

    Nevertheless, Glock decided to give this a try. In order to learn the inside outs of guns, he first went and purchased some of the best pistols in the market. These included the Swiss-German Sig Sauer P220, the Czech CZ75, the Italian Beretta 92F and the P-1 which was an advanced version of the Walther P-38 already in use by the Army. These became his study material. He pondered over their every detail – how they were built and how they operated. Not only this, he went ahead and researched extensively. Spending hours with firearms specialists, understanding what they would want in a modern handgun.

    The Target

    Glock had his work cut out for him – the Austrian Army knew exactly what it wanted – a high ammunition capacity pistol, significantly more rounds than the eight offered by the Walther P-38, weighed below twenty-eight ounces, had a streamlined design and a consistent, light trigger. All of this packed in under 40 parts.

    After spending a year researching and developing, Glock finally filed for a patent for his pistol design on 30th April 1981. On 19th May 1982, he presented his first four test pistols to the Austrian Army for review. This marked the birth of the very first Glock pistol, the Glock 17.

    The pistol was tested extensively and measured perfectly by all standards. The army accepted it into service and ordered a contract of 20,000 more such pistols from Glock. 

    Know a Glock

    The Glock 17 was a game changer in the handguns industry. It is both strong and light at the same time. Made of a polymer frame, its lower half houses a steel fire control group. Its upper half is a unified body of steel. This combination of plastic and steel allowed the gun to weigh only twenty-three ounces, well below the weight required by the Army.

    This also knocked out the other competitors Beretta 92F and the CZ75 that was made entirely of a steel frame. Further, Glock simplified the built of the gun, making it out of just thirty-four parts - nearly half of what the Beretta’s 92F pistol had.

    Pointability

    A key area of focus in Glock’s research was the pistol’s “pointability,”. This refers to the weapons’ ability to work as natural extensions of the hand and eye coordination of the shooter. This is a significant contributor towards the weapon’s ease of aiming and hence the user-friendliness and accuracy.

    This focus towards reliability and ease of use helped Glock create a weapon that was not only beautifully designed but also high on performance. So high that in a competition of ten thousand rounds his pistol failed only once.

    The Glock 17 was one of the first pistols with a capacity as high as 17. Only one amongst the others in the market could only come up to a short fifteen and the next one could do 13. The Glock 17’s capacity more than doubled the P-38’s capacity in chambering 17 rounds of seventeen rounds of nine-millimeter parabellum ammo.

    Safe Action Trigger

    Another big Easter egg in the Glock is the safe action trigger. Most handguns have a safety key that needs to be on or off to ensure that firearm does not discharge accidentally. Glock did away with the old mechanism of the safety which had the key externally on the weapon’s body and had to be maneuvered to lock or unlock. Instead, he introduced an inbuilt mechanism with a two-piece trigger that worked as the safety without the manual key. It has a big trigger and a small trigger. And the gun fires only when both the triggers are pulled, essentially turning it into a fast action point-and-shoot gun that was much appreciated by the law enforcement agencies.

    Around the World

    With all its amazing features, innovation and ease of use, it is no wonder that the Glock 40 has dominated the market since its introduction nearly four decades ago. It has razed its competition time and again and is used by armed forces and law enforcement agencies across the world including the British Armed Forces, the Iraqi military, the Israeli Defense Forces, the Indian Special Forces, the Yemeni military, the U.S. Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command and Army Rangers.

    While Glock was designing and producing his gun for the Austrian Army, the American police officers were being overpowered by criminals. The feeling that their weapon — the classic Smith & Wesson .38-caliber revolver — that they’d been using for three-quarters of a century was now inadequate was growing stronger. An FBI shootout with some bank robbers in Miami in 1986 drove the message home and they knew that they needed a more advanced weapon. At that time, Gaston Glock’s innovation came about as an answer to their prayers. And the Glock 40 quickly became a popular weapon amongst the US lawmen and civilian bodies that adopted the gun culture.

    The Glock Experience

    The Glock 40 is a feature-packed gun that beats all other guns hands down across all categories — innovation, styling, performance and ease of use. But how does it feel to use it?

    The Glock 40 requires some experience and expectation when shooting since its trigger needs some effort and the accuracy needs some practice and getting used to. Its plastic frame requires that the user maintain a firm and strong grip to help it absorb the force of firing.

    Other than that, the gun is extremely reliable and works perfectly fine in adverse conditions too making it a good choice for home and self-defense.

    The Target

    The Glock has an impressive range of pistols for every objective out there — law enforcement, shooting, hunting, first buy, self-defense, etc. They are available in different sizes, different power, and different caliber. Their smallest is the Model 42. It is a part of their Slimline collection and is a single stack handgun compatible with 380 ACP. Their larger guns include 17L, 34, 41 and 40 with the 40 being probably their most powerful handgun. Its specs make the ballistics of the cartridge comparable to the Magnum revolver.

    The full-size Model 17 in 9mm and 22 in 40 S&W, the compact Model 19 in 9mm and 23 in 40 S&W and subcompact Model 26 in 9mm and 27 in 40 S&W are some of their most popular guns representing their respective size brackets. 

    The Glock 40

    The Glock 40 have been one of the most loved Glocks of all times. They have a .40 S&W caliber and are surprisingly similar to the 9mm models. what makes a difference is not the size but the number of rounds these guns can hold. Here’s a lineup of the best Glock 40 to celebrate the genius in each of the models.

    The Glock 22

    Introduced in 1990, the Glock 22 is a full-sized gun. Its reliability and competence made it the weapon of choice for many government agencies and police forces.

    SPECS:

  • Category: Full size
  • Caliber: .40 S&W
  • Rounds Capacity: 15
  • Weight: 22.9 ounce
  • Length: 7.3″
  • Height: 5.4″
  • Width: 1.18″
  • Barrel: 4.5″
  • Trigger: Striker Fired
  • If you want the features of the 22 with more comfort and ease of use, its Gen 4 model can offer it to you. It has a better grip, a backstrap that helped adjust the thickness of the grip and a dual recoil spring that increased the longevity of the gun as compared to the Glock 22. It also had a magazine release that could be changed for left or right-handed shooters.

    When Should You Buy It

    Buy the Glock 22 of its Gen 4 is you are looking for the full-size gun which has been tested in fast-paced environments for its performance, speed, durability, and safety.

    Glock 23 — Compact

    A lightweight weapon with the amazing 15-rounds capacity. Backed by the experience of the police force, its a compact version of the .40 caliber.

    SPECS:

    • Category: Compact
    • Caliber: .40 S&W
    • Rounds Capacity: 13
    • Weight:  21.2 oz
    • Length: 6.9″
    • Height: 5.0″
    • Width: 1.18″
    • Barrel: 4.0″
    • Trigger: Striker Fired

    The gen 4 of the Model 23 adds to the proven features of the former model a texture, a modular back strap and a dual recoil spring. It also lets you add a light or other add-ons if needed.

    When Should You Buy It

    The Model 23 and it's Gen 4 is perfect for those who have small hands or need a concealable model.

    Glock 24

    Also called as the Long Slide, this gun comes with a longer barrel than the typical handguns of its size. the long barrel helps to enhance accuracy and hence, the gun is a popular one in competition shooting. The gun has a longer barrel but its magazine capacity is smaller than the average compact Glocks.

    Specs

    • Category: Full size
    • Caliber: .40 S&W
    • Rounds Capacity: 15
    • Weight:  26.7 oz
    • Length: 8.9″
    • Height: 5.4″
    • Width: 1.18″
    • Barrel: 6.0″
    • Trigger Type: Striker Fired

    When Should You Buy It

    Its long barrel makes it a good weapon with enhanced accuracy for competition shooting. Despite its barrel, the weapon is easy to carry on you daily.

    Glock 27 — Subcompact

    The subcompact Glock 27 is smaller than the compact guns. Often carried as a backup weapon by the police, its small size can be deceiving as it still packs a punch. the subcompact of the group. It has a capacity of 9+1 and is a popular weapon amongst civilians.

    A Gen 4 model with the backstrap, texture and dual recoil spring is also available for this model.

    Specs

    • Category: Sub-compact
    • Caliber: .40 S&W
    • Rounds Capacity: 9
    • Weight:  19.8 oz
    • Length: 6.3″
    • Height: 4.2″
    • Width: 1.18″
    • Barrel: 3.5″
    • Trigger Type: Striker Fired

    When Should You Buy It

    A hard hitter, this weapon is a small but powerful one that is concealable and easy to carry as a backup weapon.

    Glock 35 — Competition

    Again a favorite for competition shooters, the Glock 35 has a longer slide making it a good partner in competition shooting in the .40 caliber.

    Its Gen 4 model offers the same upgrades as other Gen 4 models except this one has a MOS (Modular Optic System) that lets you add a reflex optic to the firearm without having to machine the optic to the side.

    Specs

    • Category: Full-size
    • Caliber: .40 S&W
    • Rounds Capacity: 15
    • Weight:  24.5 oz
    • Length: 8.1″
    • Height: 5.4″
    • Width: 1.18″
    • Barrel: 5.3″

    When Should You Buy It

    The Gen 4 option of the model 35 is the only version with the MOS configuration in this caliber.

    The Final Shot

    With the wide range of great models it has, zeroing in on your Glock 40 can be difficult. But the good part is that there is no bad Glock 40. No matter which one you end up buying, it is never going to let you down.

    QUALITY

    PRICE

    RATING

    BEST

    $$$

    5/5

    Featured Image CC4 Canon67 via Wikimedia logo, text and banner added