380 VS 9mm: Ammo Comparisons, Guide, And Review

380 vs 9mm Ammo Comparisons

There is a reason why gun enthusiasts keep comparing popular ammunition. While some of them clearly win over the others, there are a few of them that are equally popular and hold the fort equally well for their side.

The long-brewing comparison between the 380, or the .380 ACP, and the 9mm, or the 9x19mm Parabellum, falls in the above category. Both are used for self-defense and have been winning over ammo buyers for years now. However, there are slight differences that make one better over the other, with regards to ballistics performance, recoil, price and more aspects.

Ahead, we’ll see a comprehensive comparison between the .380 ACP and 9mm. Before we begin, let’s look at a quick overview of both the self-defense cartridge.

 

.380 ACP: Overview

380 ACP


Introduced in 1908 by Colt in the U.S, .380 ACP was designed by John Browning, hence it is also called as the 9mm Browning at times. It was built for self-defense purpose, having a rimless case and being straight-walled.

It is known by several names, including 9mm Browning, 9mm Short, 9x17mm, due to the fact that it has the same bullet diameter as that of the original 9x19mm Parabellum, 9mm.

The .380 ACP features 9,5mm base and rim diameter and a case length of 17.3mm and overall length of 25mm. It has a shooting velocity of about 1050 feet per second and primarily used as a self-defense cartridge. It is also used as a backup pistol by police officials and by beginners due to its low recoil.

 

9mm: Overview

9mm


The 9mm or the 9x19 Parabellum features German engineering, designed by Georg Luger and was launched in 1902 by the firearms brand DWM for their Luger semi-automatic pistol. Over time, it went through various iterations and different variants were launched.

It was primarily designed for military use and till date is the standard cartridge used by NATO forces and by other law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and other countries, along with being highly popular in self-defense domain.

The 9mm features a rimless but tapered case with a bullet diameter of 9mm. The overall length of the cartridge is considerably longer at 29.69mm and case length of 19.15mm. It features a shooting velocity between 950 to 14,500 feet per second, depending on the ammo used.

 

380 VS 9mm: Comparison

While the .380 ACP is often considered interchangeable with the 9mm due to the same diameter, it’s not, really, due to different shell length and structure.

Let’s take a look at their distinct features and how they compare against each other.

Performance

The 9x19mm Parabellum wins when it comes to performance. With a heavier cartridge which has a longer shell length and produces more energy, the 9mm creates a maximum velocity of 1,400 feet per second as opposed to the maximum 1000 feet per second produced by the .380. The longer shell length means the cartridge has more powder capacity and hence the higher velocity and more power.

Consequently, the bullet fire by 9mm does more damage than the one fired by 380. The stopping power of 9mm is higher and it packs a lot more pressure to expand the bullet more than 380 could.

Recoil

man firing a gun in the forest


While the performance of 9mm is better than the 380, the fact that it produces more force and higher velocity also means that is a higher recoil which can be inconvenient to inexperienced shooters and not very handy in case of an emergency.

The .380 ACP, while produces lesser energy and does lesser damage, it has lower recoil than the 9mm and is easy to use by beginners during self-defense situations. Since the gunpowder used is lesser, the force produced is less intense and the recoil gets set off, making it easy to reacquire the target.

Target Penetration

Target

The extent to which the projectile can penetrate is what decides the scope of damage that can be caused to the target. The 9mm has considerably more penetration power than the .380 ACP.

9mm fires with more force and has a sleeker shell which builds more firepower. Therefore, all factors combined, the cartridge is able to over penetrate to 13 inches and cause substantial damage. The .380, on the other hand, packs lesser force and lower velocity shooting power which limits its penetration to 9 inches.

Therefore, 9mm has an edge over the .380 ACP in the sense that the bullet fired through 9mm has more chances and scope of tearing down the target by traversing completely through it.

Shooting Accuracy

When it comes to self-defense, firing with accuracy is one of the most important factors to prevent yourself from harm.

Since the .380 fires with less force and has lower recoil, it fires with more accuracy since there is a steadiness while using it. When you have less power against you, the pistol fires with greater accuracy. However, the .380 ACP is mainly for very short ranges due to the low velocity and pressure and can’t be expected to hit a long-range with equal accuracy.

In the end, though, the accuracy highly depends on the experience and the skill of the shooter.

Size

The .380 ACP rounds, being shorter in size, do a better job at concealing your firearm than the 9mm that is larger and needs a bigger pistol.

The .380 rounds are shorter and fire with lesser force, therefore, they can be used in pistols of subcompact size which can be concealed while carrying easily. This is why the 380 is more used as a backup handgun since it remains hidden and can be drawn out with ease being lightweight.

Pricing

The increasing popularity of the 9mm cartridges has made them widely available and hence, lowered their rates. Currently, you can buy them at a cheaper price than the .380 since the .380 are used lesser and for a very specific purpose. Therefore, the economics of supply and demand come into play and since the 9mm is greater in supply and the demand for .380 is specific.

The rounds for .380 are expensive when compared to the 9mm. On an average, it costs $20 to buy a round of ammo for the .380 as compared to $12 for a 9mm.

Practical Use

Due to shorter size rounds and subcompact guns, the .380 ACP is mainly used as a concealed carry gun for backup. Since the ballistics performance is not up to the mark when compared to the 9mm, it is not usually used as a primary weapon. The smaller size makes it easy to carry, though, and easier to conceal.

The 9mm is used as a standard ammo by the NATO armies and the other non-NATO militia, along with major law enforcement agencies. It is available in compact pistols and has more magazine round capacity, therefore, it is ideal for self-defense as well as military use.

Ammo Used

There are many options available for both, 9mm as well as .380 ACP. Both are used for self-defense and military operations, with 9mm being more dominant in the military end.

The top options of ammunition for the .380 include Liberty Civil Defense 50 grain SCHP, Hornady Custom Ammunition 90 grain, Remington 88 grain HTP and SIG Sauer 90 grain 380 V-Crown JHP. All these bullets are ideal for self-defense and have short rounds, that are suitable for pocket pistols. For a pocket pistol using .380 ACP, a 90-grain projectile will have the best case in terms of defense since it will have more penetration capability and higher velocity.

The best options of ammunition for the 9mm include Federal HST 9mm 124 grain, Federal HST 9mm 147 grain, American Eagle 9mm 115 grain and Blazer Brass 9mm. Notice that the weight of the bullets is a lot more than the ones used for .380 ACP due to more caliber and a case length of 19.5mm. The penetration of these bullets ranges between 12 to 18 inches.

 

Are .380 And 9mm Interchangeable?

While the 380 ACP and the 9x19mm Parabellum are perceived to be used interchangeably due to their same bullet diameter, they are inherently too different to be used in place of the other.

Yes, the diameter for both the cartridges is 9mm. However, the 9mm has a considerably longer shell length than the .380. The longer length means larger powder capacity and more power. The .380 has smaller size and length which makes it unsuitable for firearms suited for the 9mm.

When you use a more powerful ammo in a firearm not suited for that power, it can backfire and damage the firearm. Therefore, using a shorter .380 case in the magazine built for a longer 9mm case is evidently not a wise choice.

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380 ACP

380 ACP

9MM

9mm

 

The Conclusion

9mm wins over the .380 in terms of performance and power, clearly. The German-engineered cartridge packs more power due to a longer shell length and more caliber, with higher shooting velocity. It used heavier bullets that expand more, thereby holding better penetration.

 

The .380 is better in terms of ease of use since it has a lesser recoil due to less force exerted. It is also used with subcompact pocket pistols which are easier to carry and do a much better job at concealability. Also, even the .380 pushes out lesser force, with the right ammo used, it is a solid cartridge for self-defense.

 

While 9mm is a great possession in case of any emergency or self-defense or attack circumstances, as evident by their adoption by the military and the law enforcement agents, the .380 is best suited for close-range self-defense shooting. Take your pick according to your purpose, and you won’t go wrong with either.

6.5 Creedmoor VS 308s: Ammo Comparisons And Review

6.5 Creedmoor VS 308s

If you are an ammunition enthusiast and keep reading about the various types of bullets and cartridges, you’ll be familiar with the ever going debate on which of the long-range rounds is better, the 6.5 Creedmoor or the .308 Winchester (or 208, as it is called). Some have also hailed the 6.5 Creedmoor as the new 308, considering the time of their respective launches and the performance.

6.5 Creedmoor has gained immense popularity amongst the medium to long range target shooters, between 500 to 1000 yards. Both ammo, while having a similar base, differ quite well in their performance, mainly ballistic and recoil.

Ahead, we’ll compare the 6.5 Creedmoor against the .308 Winchester and see whether it really is the upgrade you were looking for. Before that, let’s take a quick overview of both the ammo.

308 Winchester: Overview

308 winchester

Launched in 1952, .308 has long been the preferred short-action ammo for target shooters and hunters. It is a rimless cartridge and was used to derive the 7.62x51mm NATO rifle, commercially. Therefore, it has been used by civilians as well as military agents alike.

Due to its short case, the .308 Winchester became very popular with and suitable for the short action rifles.  If loaded with an expanding bullet, the round tears into the target and therefore, the 308s are ideally extensively used for hunting large targets as well, like a black bear, whitetail deer or even an elk. The 308 load has more drop at longer ranges, resulting in lower muzzle velocity.

6.5 Creedmoor: Overview

creedmoor

The 6.5 Creedmoor is a newer launch, having released in 2007. However, it has taken over a lot of market share due to its high ballistic performance and lower recoil than other rounds. It is a centerfire rifle cartridge, with a length of 2.825 which can accommodate short-action bolt rifles as well as AR-10 semi-automatic ones.

The 6.5 Creedmoor was designed for long-range target shooting and can deliver as further and beyond as 1,200 yards. It has also taken over the .308 Winchester in terms of being highly accurate in its aim. It also has a lesser recoil, making it a preferred choice over other long-range rounds among target shooters since lesser recoil means faster re-aiming.

6.5 Creedmoor VS 308 Winchester

6.5 Creedmoor VS 308

6.5 Creedmoor is hailed as the upgraded version of the 308 Winchester, one that offers a lot more in the same domains. Even the parent cartridge of 6.5 Creedmoor was derived from the 308. 

Let’s compare both these rounds in terms of their performance, availability, price and ballistics, and see which one comes out looking better.

Ballistics Performance


The 6.5 Creedmoor is sleeker and longer, making it ergonomically more aerodynamic. It can shoot as further as 1,000-1,200 yards, while the 308 is bounded to approximately 500 yards.

The 6.5 Creedmoor propellants weigh 120 grains whose muzzle velocity after 500 yards is 2,078 feet per second, which is brilliant for long-range target shooting. The 308 uses bullets in the 150 grains weight range and the muzzle velocity drops to 1,963 feet per second after 500 yards.

The difference between the two can be a huge deciding factor when it comes to precision shooting. They both start at a similar velocity, with 6.5 CM firing at 3,010 feet per second and the .308 Winchester firing at 3000 feet per second, but the .308 considerably slows down to the projectile weight and structure. The longer and thinner bullets of 6.5 CM allow it to keep its fast velocity stable over long distances.

Cartridge Case


6.5 Creedmoor has a substantially shorter case than the 308 Winchester. The case for 6.5 CM is derived from its parent cartridge, the .30 TC. The shorter case means a longer bullet, which is why it performs better in terms of ballistics.

6.5 cartridge

There is a difference in the sharpness of the shoulders of the two as well, which is why the recoil varies. The 6.5 Creedmoor has a 30 degrees shoulder angle as opposed to the 20 degrees of .308, making it sharper. The length of the shell casing of 6.5 CM bullet is 48.8mm.

When used for longer periods, there is another difference that comes to light that brass in 6.5 Creedmoor lasts longer than the .308 Winchester, making it more durable.

Available Ammo


The bullets for the .308 Winchester weight about 150 grains, while those for 6.5 Creedmoor weigh 30 grains lighter at 120 grains. There is a huge variety available for both. The cost does not differ much, with the ammo for both at similar price levels.

The bullet selection for .308 Winchester is essentially more than the 6.5 Creedmoor since it has been there for about 60 years, but the performance of the projectiles used by the latter is a lot better, having better ballistic caliber and more speed. They have a lower drop. The 6.5 Creedmoor bullets also have a better density which results in higher penetration into the target. For the 6.5 Creedmoor, a bullet weighing 140 grains has a higher caliber of .526 and a velocity of 2710 feet per second, which is more than what .308 has to offer.

Some bullets available for the 6.5 Creedmoor are Hornady ELD Match 120 grains, 147 grains; Nosler Match Grade Custom Bullet Tip 140gr; Nosler Ballistic Tip 140gr, etc.

The .308 Winchester uses Federal Fusion Ammo 165 grains, Fiocchi Barnes TTSX Load 168 grains, Federal Premium Vital-Shok 165 grains, and a whole lot more choices.

With most brands, the ammo for the .308 Winchester is cheaper and more readily available than the 6.5 Creedmoor.

Recoil And Lifespan


The 6.5 Creedmoor definitely sees a lesser recoil due to the lighter weight of the bullets used. This makes the shooting considerably easier and takes lesser time in reacquiring the target, which is why it is preferred by the target-shooter and becoming more popular with the hunters as well.

The barrel lifespan is more for the .308 Winchester. Due to a smaller bore of the 6.5 CM and the fact that it has a higher firing velocity, the barrel life is a little shorter than its rival.

308 barrel


Rifles Available


As with the ammo, the rifles for 6.5 Creedmoor are not very easily available due to its recency in the launch. On the other hand, there is a huge availability of all short-action rifles style you’d want for the .308 Winchester. For example, if you take Savage rifles, they have about 10 models suitable for the 6.5 CM while a whopping 36 for the .308 Winchester.

Also, the 6.5 Creedmoor being a dominantly long-range round, the rifles available are a little difficult to find because they are all precision, high-quality rifles, which cost more and have a specific use. Still, in the current market, the precision rifles for the .308 are a lot more easy and widely available than for the 6.5 CM.

There are some precision rifles that do are apt for both cartridges, for instance, the Ruger Precision Rifle. It is also a beginners rifle for long-range shooting, so the fact that it caters to 6.5 Creedmoor should really punch up its popularity further.

Pricing


There isn’t a lot of difference between the pricing of 6.5 Creedmoor and the 308s. However, on an average, a round of 308s will cost about 10 cents less than a round of 6.5 Creedmoor.

For example, with the Federal Premium Gold Medal Berger, a round of .308 Winchester costs $1.47 while a round of 6.5 Creedmoor costs $1.57. On the other hand, the Hornady American Whitetail ammo costs the same for both, priced at $1.07/round. However, the 6.5 Creedmoor is made by Hornady, therefore, any ammunition that comes from the brand is bound to be cheaper for the CM.

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308 Winchester

308 winchester

6.5 Creedmoor

creedmoor

The Conclusion

The main difference between the 308s and the 6.5 Creedmoor lies in the range delivered and the precision. The 6.5 Creedmoor has a longer range and better accuracy, in short, a better ballistic performance. For long-range target shooter, the high velocity due to the aerodynamic build of the cartridge does a better job.

The .308 Winchester is, however, more deadly when it comes to tearing the target down and has a longer barrel life. The ammo is widely and more readily available and there is a wider selection of rifles built for it. The bullet is more deadly and does more damage as well due to wider diameter. It falls short when it comes to long-range shooting when compared with the 6.5 Creedmoor due to heavier bullets and the structure.

If you are looking for a round to target anywhere within 500 yards and have a restricting budget, .308 Winchester should be your go-to choice.

For anyone looking at precision shooting at a range longer than 500 yards, 6.5 Creedmoor is a clear choice. It is definitely a little more expensive considering it’s still in its nascent stage of popularity, but the accuracy and the performance offered surpasses the long-standing reliability of .308 Winchester.

9mm VS 45: What Is The Difference Between The Two?

9mm vs 45 Ammo Comparisons


Choosing your gun is amongst one of the most crucial decisions you make in your life. Usually, depending upon the intended purpose of the weapon, common considerations that guide a gun buying decision include its size, shooting range, ease of firing, sound produced on firing, weight and the cost. For instance, if you need the gun for your safety and protection at home, then you might be okay with a big gun like a shotgun or a rifle as long as it comfortable to fire. If you intend to carry the firearm on your person then you would want it to be compact and easy to conceal.

However, another important factor that can influence your decision is the kind of cartridge the gun uses and what will you need. There are many different kinds of ammo. So many that a first-time buyer can get thoroughly confused. For the sake of dialing down the confusion, we are only going to pitt a 9mm vs 45 in this article.

 

What Is A Cartridge?

Commonly confused with a bullet, a cartridge or ammo actually has these components:

  • A bullet which is the actual part of the cartridge that impacts the target.
  • A casing which holds the primer and powder and makes the shell of the cartridge.
  • A primer which helps ignite the powder.
  • A powder that explodes.

At the bottom of the cartridge is the primer. It is a chemical compound which is struck by the firing pin at the base of the cartridge when the gun’s trigger is pulled. This creates a spark and ignites the powder. The powder catches fire and explodes. This explosion creates a large amount of pressure that throws the bullet out of the cartridge and ultimately out of the barrel of the gun resulting in the weapon firing.

The empty cartridge needs to be removed from the weapon to make room for the next cartridge to be fired. Some weapons do this automatically while some need to be emptied manually.

 

How Does Ammo Differ?

gun ammo


If it is your first experience with owning a gun, the sea of options in ammo can make it very difficult to choose the right ammo for you. But there are two broad differences that can help you out.

The first is whether you want a rimfire or a centerfire ammo. In the centerfire cartridges, you’ll be able to see the primer in the center of the base of the bullet. If the base of the cartridges is flat with no primer in the center, it is a rimfire ammo.

It just means that firing pin will hit the center in the case of centerfire ammo and it will hit the rim in case of the rimfire ammo. Though, the rimfire bullets are much cheaper, you will usually find them only small caliber.

This brings us to the second big difference - the size of the ammo. There are many different sizes of cartridges - 9mm, .40 S&W, 45 ACP, 12 Ga, .50 BMG and the list goes on.

 

Why Size Matters

Ammo contributes significantly to the choice of gun you make because of its size. Guns that use larger cartridges have more stopping power - that means a greater impact on the target. At the same time, they are slow to fire continuously because of the higher recoil. Their size may also decrease the magazine capacity, which we will talk about later, and their follow up shots are also limited.

Guns with smaller cartridges offer the advantage of fast follow up shots and more room for multiple shots. Also, their stopping power is less, which is safer for first time users.

As promised, let us understand and compare the 9mm and 45 to help you understand which one is the cartridge for you so you can choose the right gun for yourself.

 

History

Both, the 9mm and 45 go back to the beginning of the 20th century.

Actually named the 9x19 Parabellum, the 9mm was designed by George Luger way back in 1901 and went into production a year later. It was adopted by the German Navy and German Army in the years 1904 and 1906, respectively. It was also used by the German forces in World War 1.

In the year 1904, John Browning developed the .45, commonly called the 45. Many countries including the United States used it during the World War 1.

Both cartridges have been popular amongst the worlds’ armed forces since then.

This is pretty much where the similarities between the two cartridges end. Both are so popular with patrons rooting for them equally that besides a few common factors it is always the 9mm vs 45.

 

9mm vs 45 man firing a gun


9mm VS 45: What’s The Difference?

Let’s get to the why these cartridges are so different.

Origin

The 45 was made in the United States of America while the 9mm was made in Germany.

Diameters

  • Bullet Diameter: The bullet diameter, also known as the caliber, determines the whole it makes in the target. The 9mm as the name suggests has a diameter of 9.01 mm whereas the .45 has a diameter of .452 inches or 11.01 mm. You will often find guns being named in a caliber. That is because of the diameter of the gun’s barrel and hence, of the cartridge.
  • Base Diameter: The 9mm has a base diameter of 9.93 mm, while the 45 has one of 12.1 mm.
  • Neck Diameter: The 9mm has a base diameter of 9.96 mm, while the 45 has one of 12.2 mm.

Case Type

There have been no significant findings to prove the effect of casing design on a bullet’s velocity or ballistics. Yet, some manufactures claim that their design makes a difference. In case of the 9mm, you’ll find the casing to be tapered while the 45 has a straight one.

Case Length

The case length can affect how far inside a bullet is seated in the cartridge.

You will find a case length of .898 inches in a 45 and of .754 inches in a 9mm cartridge.

Expansion

The 9mm expands .36” to .72” while the 45 expands .45” to .79”.

Length Of The Cartridge

A cartridge length should be able to accomodate the following:

  • The neck should be long enough to give the cartridge a comfortable seating and enough hold.
  • The cartridge should not be too big for the gun’s magazine.

The 9mm ammo is 19.15mm long while the 45 is 32.4mm long.

Pressure

The pressure is one of the contributors to how far and how fast the bullet is projected from the cartridge and gun. The 9mm has a maximum pressure of 34,084 psi, while the 45 has maximum pressure of  21,000 psi.

Velocity

A high speed cartridge is always better. Hence, with a velocity range of 95-1400 FPS, the 9mm beats the 45 which travels in a range of 700-1150 FPS.

Energy

The 9mm carries an energy of 115 grains: 323 foot-pounds which is much lower than the 185 grains: 411 foot pounds of the 45.

Momentum

Ballistic experts have maintained that the momentum is a good measure of the bullet’s performance. In that case the 9mm falls short of momentum by a large gap against the 45.

Primer

The 45 uses the same primer as large rifles while the 9mm uses the Berdan or Boxer primer for small pistols. The Berdan primer is mostly used by militaries though it is reusable, it is a difficult process as the primer cup is attached to the casing itself. While the boxer primer is most popular is the United States due to its ease of replacement.

Penetration

The deeper a bullet penetrates, the more damage it causes to the target. The 45 gives a bullet penetration of 11.3” to 14.3” as compared to the 9mm’s 8” to 15.9” penetration.

Capacity Of The Magazine

The 9mm cartridges are smaller than the 45. Hence, magazines can hold more of the 9mm. However, the capacity may vary depending upon which gun is being used. Usually, a magazine shipped from the factory can carry 6-14 cartridges in case of 45s and 6-20 cartridges in case of the 9mms.

Recoil

man pointing a gun

Recoil refers to the force with which a firearm recoils when it is fired without support from behind. It impacts the user and can even cause serious injury. The 9mm cartridge has a lower recoil than the 45 ammo. The latter is known to push the firearm user’s hands backward on firing.

Cost

A 9mm cartridge is much cheaper than the 45.

Happy Choosing

There you are! Now you know pretty much everything you need to know to choose the right cartridge for you. The 9mm trumps the 45 in aspects such as cost, easy to replace primer, more magazine capacity and lower recoil, the 45 seems to be made to get the job done with its higher penetration, momentum and energy.

You can now weigh the pros and cons of both the cartridges to decide what works best for you.

 

Sources:

Diffen

Pew Pew Tactical

Gun Digest

Hunter Ed

Mass Reloading

Clip vs. Magazine: What You Really Need To Know


Most of us wouldn’t care much if we interchanged the words “clips” with “magazines”. It is, however, crucial to realize that they are not the same and come with a considerable difference. We will be covering all the relevant details that you need to know between a clip and magazine in this article.

We have all marveled at the ease with which Arnold Schwarzenegger has handled his guns in movies like Predator and The Terminator. While the on-screen effect seemed unbelievable and mind-blowing, there is more to guns and ammunition than rippling muscles and adrenaline!

In this article, we will be exploring gun terminologies namely “clips” and “magazines” and throw some light on factors like how they are not the same and how will you be able to identify one from another and prevent a foot-in-the-mouth moment the next time you are discussing guns and ammo within your social circle.

Clip vs Magazine


It is very important to be familiar with the terms used in a particular subject when you are discussing it. Having a sound knowledge of the subject would give you an added advantage to make your mark when you are conversing about it with your family members, friends or peers.

Just as we tend to use specific terms like offensive backfield, quarterback and fullback while discussing football, we would also need to get acquainted with the specific terms that are generally used in the area of guns and ammunition.

Clips and magazines are the two terms which are used interchangeably quite often and one is mistaken for the other. This is not true and there is a large difference between the two when it comes to their design, composition and usability in a gun.

A clip refers to a device that is used to store rounds of ammunition in a single pack. This means that it holds together individual rounds of ammunition and helps to keep them as one. It holds the ammo together so that it can be loaded easily into a magazine or a firearm cylinder.

A magazine, on the other hand, is a device that is designed to hold ammunition together and keep it ready to be fired when required. It loads the ammo into the chamber of the firearm.

Since these definitions may take time to sink in, it is quite easy to spot the reason behind the confusion created by these terms. In simple words, a clip comes in handy while feeding rounds into a magazine when required while a magazine is used to feed rounds into the firearm chamber in return.

When To Use What


Now that we have cleared the fog surrounding clips and magazines, it is quite apparent that the two are very different from each other and one cannot be substituted in place of the other. It is now important to understand when to use which term when there is a discussion about guns and ammunition.

A clip is a usually created out of a steel stamping and are engineered in different patterns depending on the type of gun into which it is to be loaded. Their main function is to load ammunition into a magazine that loads single rounds for firing.

Rifles come with a detachable and a non-detachable setting and the clips used in each type vary in their design. For riles that come with a non-detachable magazine, the clips are used to load bullets directly into the firearm. A clip can be loaded into a detachable magazine but such a setting is uncommon and not frequently seen.

A magazine is essentially an area from where ammunition is fed into the firing chamber as and when required. A magazine can be fitted internally into a firearm or it can be removable. It is almost the size of the gun itself that is responsible for feeding ammo into the firearm chamber.

A clip is smaller in size and therefore cannot hold more than 10 rounds while magazines have a larger capacity and are capable of holding up to a 100 rounds.

Types Of Clips


Since clips are used to load ammunition into the magazine, they are compact and are easy to load. They also help in saving a lot of time which would otherwise have been spent on loading ammo every time you fired from the gun. These clips come in various forms and can be used in a wide variety of guns that are available today.

Stripper Clip

This kind of a clip is used to load internal box magazines where a stripper clip binds the ammunition together on a piece of metal and keeps it ready to be loaded. This is the most widely used type of clip that is available today.

In order to use this clip, you will need to position it on top of the magazine and give it a push down into the magazine to load it in bolt-action rifles or semi-automatics. It can also be used in a detachable magazine by using the same operating mechanism.

ESKS Original Mosin Nagant Ammo Pouch, Cleaning Kit, and 5 Stripper...
  • Original Russian Made Pouch
  • 5 stripper clips (repros)
  • Cleaning kit

En Bloc Clip

An En Bloc clip is an ejectable clip that is automatically discarded from a gun once all the ammo has been used up. It is inserted completely into the magazine which pushes the rounds up into the chamber and keeps them ready for action.

This clip is found in old guns and is not very popular today due to the availability of stripper clips and their ease of use.

Half Moon/Full Moon Clip

These are the classic ones that we have seen in movies where the round chamber within a revolver rotates to load a fresh bullet after the previous one has been fired. These clips are usually seen in revolvers with pistol cartridges such as 0.45 Auto and 9mm.

A half moon and a full clip can hold 3 and 6 rounds respectively as they can be easily inserted into the firing cylinder of a revolver. While this type has faced a stiff competition from speed loaders, their advantage is that they help to discard the shell casings almost immediately after the rounds are fired.

Types Of Magazines


Magazines are available in a variety of types today. While some are detachable, the others are internally attached. Some even have the capacity to feed the rounds directly from the tube! We will be discussing a few of these types in this article.

Box Magazine

This is the most common and the most famous type of magazines that can be seen today. It comes in two variants - the internal box magazine and the detachable box magazine. The loading and firing mechanisms may be a bit different from each other but their functions remain the same more or less.

It is commonly seen in bolt action rifles and in the older versions of semi-automatic rifles like the SKS and M1 Garand. The magazines can be loaded in two ways - through the top of the gun or with the use of clips.

Detachable Box Magazine

Magazines are a tool to load the ammo straight into the firing chamber so that it could be used when the need arises. A detachable box magazine is also one of the most preferred types of magazine that is in demand today and is seen in popular rifles like the AR-15, Ruger 10/22, semi-automatic rifles and AK variants.

In this, the detachable box stays apart from the firearm despite it is loaded. This makes it a safe and also makes it quicker to use when the need arises. It is also easy to carry and transport than many other magazines.

STANAG Magazine

These magazines are designed according to the NATO agreement that permits soldiers to exchange their rifles even though the models are different. This magazine is designed to fit with rifles of different makes like 5.56mm and firearms belong to AR, M16 and M4 families along with others like IMI, Beretta and SIG.

Tubular Magazine

Firearms come with a fixed magazine in the form of a tube that uses the combination of a tube, a spring and the trigger to load ammo into the firing chamber. The rounds can be loaded one at a time into the magazine from where they are loaded into the firing chamber.

This type of a magazine is usually seen in firearms like .22 rifles, shotguns and lever action rifles.

Shoot It!


We have covered already covered the basics related to clips and magazines along with the differentiation that proves that they are not the same and can definitely not be used interchangeably. There is always a lot of information available for you to read up in case the talk about guns and ammo fascinates you.

Being able to tell a clip from a magazine with add to your credibility the next time you are out discussing guns with your social acquaintances or taking shooting lessons from the experts. The easiest way of distinguishing the two would be to know that a magazine comes with a spring while a clip does not!

Review, History, And Features Of The AK-47 Draco Guns

Who hasn’t heard of the “infamous” AK-47? This is one weapon everyone is aware of and the popularity of the Avtomat Kalashnikova or commonly known as the AK-47 is due to the fact that it is one of the most reliable rifles in the world. The AK-47 is an extremely well-made rifle and is easy to use and maintain. The rifle is chambered in the powerful 7.62x39mm round. There are many variations of the AK-47 that have been developed over the years.

In our review, we will be essentially looking at the miniature version of the AK-47 rifle i.e. the AK-47 Draco Pistol. The Draco pistol is manufactured in Romania and is imported by Century Arms. The Draco is produced in the same factory that makes Romanian military rifles.

AK-47 Draco

History Of The AK-47


The AK-47 is undoubtedly the most iconic and most manufactured weapon in history. The unique curved magazine of the AK-47 and its grip are recognized the world over. The name AK-47 originated from the Russian “Avtomat Kalashnikova” and the name was in honor of the main designer of the firearm, Mikhail Kalashnikov and the automatic firing abilities of the weapon and the 47 essentially denotes the year 1947, when the trials for the rifle began, which was finally approved for use by the armed forces of the Soviet Union.

The AK-47 is indeed the most successful, as well as, popular assault rifles in history and there is no comparison in terms of the number of guns manufactured, worldwide deployment of the weapon and service duration.

The AK-47 is not a completely original design and is actually a union of the design concepts from several pre-existing weapons. The design of the gas-driven mechanism, the trigger system, rotating bolt and safety catch of the AK-47 were all borrowed from weapons that already existed. However, all these features were merged to develop the AK-47 rifle which offered fantastic durability, ruggedness and low production costs.

And, the result of this was the production of an extremely lightweight firearm that had a moderate recoil and which was easy to handle and control yet placed quite a lot of power in the hands of the shooter. The accuracy of the rifle was a secondary factor and it was the power and ability to deliver firepower in an effective manner, which made the AK-47 unlike any other rifle produced before.

Features Of The Draco Pistol


The Draco is equipped with a barrel that is 12.25 inches long and the barrel sports wooden furniture and a very short sight radius. However, the pistol features an SB Tactical Brace.

How The Draco Performs On The Range


The Draco is quite a “hottie” when it comes to its performance on the range. The 12.25-inch barrel is capable of producing quite a huge muzzle blast and flash and without the muzzle device, the pistol actually roars.

The 7.62x39mm round of the pistol does not suffer massively in terms of the performance due to the short barrel of the pistol. In reality, it only loses around 200 FPS due to the short barrel and is more capable ballistically compared to the other short barreled rifles such as the 5.56 rifles.

Since the 7.62x39mm round is designed for use at a distance of 300m or lesser, it may be quite difficult to hit long range targets with the Draco pistol, which has a short sight radius. However, the Draco is powerful when used within its effective range. The potency of the pistol at close quarters and the short size of the weapon makes the Draco excellent for home defense.

The recoil of the Draco is minimal, especially if it is braced properly against your arm or shoulder. The pistol is easy to control and you can shoot with ease. You may experience some muzzle rise while shooting with the pistol; however, this is controllable and using a muzzle device can help to control the rise.

Ergonomics


The Draco pistol has the charging handle located on the right side and if you master the technique, you can charge the gun with your left hand too. The magazine release is an ambidextrous paddle that is located behind the magazine. You need practice to use it properly for speed and tactical reloads. However, the worst aspect of the weapon is its safety, which is quite difficult to master and not intuitive as you would find in the AR-15 or any type of western rifle. The Draco pistol is quite easy to handle with the SB Tactical Brace. The pistol is short, compact, lightweight and extremely simple to maneuver, control and fire. However, without the brace, the pistol can be quite heavy and clumsy to handle and difficult to fire with accurately.

Reliability


In terms of the reliability, the Draco is very reliable. Even if you do not clean it for thousands of rounds, the pistol works pretty efficiently. And you just need to pull the trigger lightly for the pistol to go off.

Purpose


The Draco is exceptionally short, which makes it very easy to use, especially at close quarters. The pistol is the perfect length if you are using it inside your home. You can control the pistol very well and use the sights if you have an SB Tactical Brace for the gun and you can brace it. The round of the pistol is quite large and when it is fed from a 30-round magazine, it will give you sufficient power to shoot.

AK Pistol Variants


Over the years, with SBRs (short-barreled rifles) becoming quite popular, so have AK-type pistols. The Romanian Draco, the Mini Draco and the Serbian PAP M92 are among the most popular AK pistol variants in the market. And, depending on the import market and if they include a brace, the AK pistols cost anywhere in the range of $525- $600. All the AK pistol variants have stamped receivers and are chambered in 7.62x39mm magazines.

The Serbian PAP M92 is imported current and makes use of the Yugo-patterned handguards and sports 26 × 1.5 mm muzzle threads. The Draco pistols make use of standard AKM-patterned handguards, while the Mini Draco features the single-piece proprietary handguard. Both the Romanian, as well as the Mini Draco have 14 x 1 mm muzzle thread, which is covered by a muzzle cap that is welded shut.

The Serbian PAP M92 has a barrel that is 10” long, the Romanian Draco has an 11.75” long barrel and the Mini Draco has a 7.75” barrel. While the barrel of the Dracos is lined with chrome, the Serbian PAP M92’s barrel is not chrome lined. Both the Draco variants are cut-down versions of the AKM, while the PAP M92 is similar to AKS-74U type weapon, which also known as Krinkov.

AK pistols do not have the same restrictions under 922(r) like rifles as they mainly comprise components which are completely foreign-made.

Mini Draco Pistol Review


Features Of The Mini Draco Pistol

The Mini Draco pistol as we know is based on the design of the AK-47 rifle. Chambered in 7.62x39mm, the pistol is ideal for very specific purposes such as residential or static purposes or as a weapon for personal defense that engages the target at a close distance. The pistol has an 18-inch barrel, which makes it moderately compact compared to other pistols chambered in larger calibers.  

The Draco Mini accommodates all types of magazines that can be used with AK-47 rifles. The pistol features a Midwest Industries rail which is made especially for the Draco Mini. The rail has circular divots and 4 rails which are positioned around every assembly plane and the assembly is pretty simple.

The rail has a Bushnell Red Dot optic which is reliable and rugged and maintains battery life and offers 11 dim settings. The pistol has a 6-MOA hold (1.5-inches at 25 yards); however, for the purpose of close-range defense, the pistol offers excellent near to mid-range coverage. The sight radius of the Mini Draco’s iron sights are around 6-inches and the rear sight is located toward the forward aft of the pistol, adding around 10-inches to the “eyeball rear sight” distance.

The Mini Draco is equipped with a Medieval flash suppressor from Troy Industries and though the fireball is significant, the pistol reduces the optic signature of the flash considerably. The pistol has a standard rubberized Hogue grip which helps to reduce the recoil and also better control of the weapon, especially when you’re shooting in various stances.

The internal parts of the Mini Draco are very similar to the AK-47; however, the pistol has a composite block behind the bolt assembly. Since the gas rod of the Mini Draco is much shorter than the AK-47, the bolt group does not need the same recoil distance as the AK.

Pros And Cons Of The Mini Draco Pistol

Pros

  • Versatile
  • Compact
  • Reliable
  • Check Circle
    Has a powerful caliber
  • Check Circle
    Can be modified easily
  • Check Circle
    Sufficiently accurate

Cons

  • Quite expensive
  • Dependent on the composite block
  • Requires specific after-market parts

Romanian Draco Review


Features Of The Romanian Draco

Romanian Draco Pistol


The Romanian Draco is a legal variant of the legendary AK-47 rifle created by Mikhail Kalashnikov and is targeted to the civilians. The weapon basically is a truncated version of the AK rifle and the original objective of the firearm is to bring in the heavy-weight firepower to any fight in a smaller package. The Romanian Draco is ideal for paratroopers, Spetsnaz fighters and tanker who require greater power in a more compact sized weapon.

The Romanian Draco features an 11.75-inch barrel that has a muzzle nut which is welded on and a Hogue stock. The weapon is different compared to the AK-47 rifles as it does not have a stock that folds, instead of the 5.45×39mm chambering, the weapon is chambered in 7.362×39mm and it is a semi-automatic weapon.

Originally, the Krinkov carbines were AK-47 pattern rifles that were shortened and the Romanian Draco is an AKM pattern weapon and has a legal classification as a handgun. So, when you make modifications to the Romanian Draco, you must be careful and follow the recommended parameters for modification.

The Romanian Draco uses the 7.62x39mm cartridge, which is essentially round fire projectiles of 100 grains – 155 grains with velocities between 1,700 feet/sec to around 3,000 feet/sec depending on the load and bullet weight.

The Romanian Draco needs a fair amount of training and practice to get used to and you may initially find the recoil pretty harsh, which may be due to the fact that the gun has a short barrel and no stock. Overall, the Romanian Draco offers a great feeling when you are shooting with it. As far as a compact weapon goes, the Romanian Draco is very versatile and handy.

Pros And Cons Of The Romanian Draco

Pros

  • Check Circle
    There is plenty of firepower that you get for the small, compact gun.
  • Check Circle
    It is quite light in weight.
  • Check Circle
    The gun is short and handy at a close shooting range.
  • Check Circle
    Sturdy gun that offers an extremely effective round.

Cons

  • The short barrel of the gun and lack of a stock make the Romanian Draco quite difficult to control, especially in the situation of rapid fire. These factors also make the gun less accurate.
  • May not be reliable.

The Draco is a great fun gun and is ideal for the purposes of home defense. Although the gun is quite loud, it is an excellent gun to shoot with and defend yourself. And, at the end of the day, it is as close you can get to an AK and who wouldn’t want to own one!

Review And Guide To Bullet Sizes And Types For Beginners

Review & Guide To Bullet Sizes And Types For Beginners

bullets on a table with different bullet sizes

There was a time when there were only a couple of types of bullets and they were used all around. However, over time, the ammunition industry evolved to manufacture a plethora of types and sizes of bullets.

Before we get into the details of the sizes and the types, it is important to know the basic terminology associated with ammunition. The entire unit that we generally understand as the bullet is called a cartridge which further constitutes of a bullet. A bullet is the metal projectile inside the cartridge along with the gunpowder, the casing generally made from steel or brass and the primer which is an ignition for the propellant.

The caliber is the diameter of the barrel, which is actually the diameter of the bullet or the bullet size in layman terms. Hence, when you go shopping for bullets and asking about bullet sizes, you are essentially looking for caliber size of the cartridge.

Things To Consider Before Deciding On The Bullet Size

Before you make your decision about the caliber size you want to buy, there are certain aspects you should know about.

  • The weight of the bullet is measured in ‘grains’. One pound is equivalent to 7,000 grains.
  • The exact speed of the bullet in feet/sec.
  • The stopping power of the bullet, i.e, the number of bullets it would take to hit the target and drop it.

Types Of Bullets

Bullets with gun

While there are a number of typical and complex bullet types available in the market, we’ll go over the ones that are the most commonly used in hunting, self-defense and shooting ranges.

Hollow Point Bullets

Considered among the more dangerous ones, hollow point bullets are structured to expand on collision with the target. They are mostly used for home defense and by armed forces, mainly police force, due to their intense stopping power. Individuals carrying concealed guns also prefer hollow point bullets.

While considered dangerous, they are the best in case of an attack since their high stopping power ensures maximum damage with every subsequent bullet and restricts the attacker.

Full Metal Jacket

Full metal jacket, or FMJ as they are called, are the most common type of bullets, mainly used in shooting ranges with short distances.

The bullet is made of a soft metal like lead in the center and which is covered by hard metal like copper. The presence of an outer metal covering ensures that the lead is not left in the barrel on firing the bullet. These bullets come in all kinds of shapes - be it pointy, round, or flat.

FMJ bullets are not very suitable for self-defense or attacks due to low stopping power. They cut channels, small in size, through which they go through the target. FMJs are designed in a way that the bottom of the cup they are made from become the tip of the bullet.

Open Tip Matches

OTMs have a very small opening on the top which makes them quite similar to hollow point bullets, however, they can’t expand due to the opening. They are made in a way that the bottom of the copper cup they are made becomes the bottom of the bullet.

This type of bullets is preferred mainly by long-distance shooting ranges and target shooters since they are manufactured in a way that the bullets are standardized when it comes to their roundness. The consistency enables their suitability for shooting long-range targets.

Ballistic Tip

Ballistic tip is the combination of full metal jacket and hollow point bullet types. It takes the stopping power of the hollow point and the physical structure of FMJ to create a bullet that is long with a boat-tail base and has a plastic covering.

Ballistic tip bullets are pointy with consistent and sleek bottoms. The tip is made of plastic which enables it to keep the shape intact. These types of bullets are mainly used in hunting due to the high stopping power. The weight is mostly collected in the back of the bullet to give it more speed.

Soft Point

Designed to expand on hitting the target, soft point bullets are made of a soft metal, like lead, at their core and have a covering of a strong, hard metal. The front tip is left open with some of the lead exposed so that the soft metal can easily expand on hitting the target.

Therefore, soft point bullets are quite similar to the full metal jacket bullets. They can cause some serious wounds since they do more damage due to expansion than their original caliber size. They are available in both boat-tails and normal cylindrical ends.

Bird Shot

As the name suggests, these are small cartridges used for hunting birds, primarily. These are available as shotgun rounds and come in multiple quantities, more than a dozen, in one shell.

Bird shots are used only as shotgun rounds and for shooting birds and pigeons, but never for attack or self-defense.

Apart from the above, there is buck shot that is the best bullet type for home security. Then there are slugs that can cause serious damage if used by an expert and can shoot a target within a 100 yards.

Bullet Sizes

It’s quite natural for a novice to get confused when it comes to buying ammunition. There are so many sizes of bullets, technically called caliber sizes, available in the market today that it can be tough to select the one that fits best with your requirement.

The most common use for bullets for people generally is hunting, self-defense or targeting shooting at the range. Therefore, we’ll cover the bullet sizes that mostly cater to these objectives.

Bullet Sizes

.22LR

The .22LR is the most commonly sold bullet due to a variety of factors. The .22 long rifle, as its called, is the starter caliber for shooters, used to hunt snakes, birds, etc. Here are some specific features of the bullet:

  • The bullet weighs about 30-40 grains.
  • Negligible recoil, therefore, makes a great caliber for people who are just beginning to shoot.
  • It’s a rimfire, i.e, the primer is located in the rim rather than the center.
  • Priced at 7 cents a round, making it extremely cheap.
  • High speed and intense shooting power with small size.
  • Apt for shooting ranges and hunting or training.
  • Bullet velocity of approximately 1200-1600 feet/sec
  • The .22LR is the best option for beginners due to its cheap price and minimum hassles of handling. While it is meant for shooting birds and snakes and targets, it can cause serious wounds if shot at a human as well since the caliber keeps moving inside the body and damages the internal organs.

    .25ACP

    .25 ACP, the Automatic Colt Pistol, is an upgraded version of .22LR, being a little larger and slightly higher stopping power. It’s a centerfire caliber, which means that the primer is placed in the center.


    It is considered more reliable due to the centerfire covering. Let’s see some of the features of .25ACP:

  • Slightly larger than .22LR, but still compact.
  • Has a higher stopping power.
  • Centerfire caliber, i.e, primer is located in the center, and straight-walled.
  • Used for short ranges and the caliber has low velocity.
  • Reliable due to the centerfire casings.
  • More expensive, priced at 20 cents a bullet.
  • The .25ACP is meant to be in handguns used for home security since they can cause more damage due to higher stopping power and the reliable centerfire design.

    9mm Luger

    The 9mm Luger or the 9x19mm Parabellum, as it’s technically named, is basically an all-rounder bullet that can be used in self-defense as well as for recreational shooting. The shooting power depends on the type of gun used with the caliber. However, they do have a very low recoil which makes them more popular.


    Here’s what you get when you purchase the 9mm Luger:

  • Bullet weight between 115 and 147 grains.
  • Big bullet size, similar to .380ACP.
  • The standard caliber used in NATO nations and by most of the police officers universally.
  • Can be used with multiple guns, and the guns can have 15-17 rounds of these on an average.
  • Priced at 25 cents.
  • The 9mm Luger can also be used in concealed guns. The size is ideal to be used in a lot of types of guns.

    .56×45 mm

    Also called as the .223, the .56x45mm is used both by the armed forces as well as the civilians. The caliber is good to use for long-range, therefore, it’s popular as a home defense round among civilians.


    Here’s what you need to know about the .56x45mm:

  • Has a slight recoil, therefore, should be handled by professionals.
  • Bullets weigh around 55 grains.
  • Used in some specific rifles, like M16/M4.
  • The cartridge has a long-range accuracy but shoots mildly.
  • Used both in the military as well as common use, but it isn’t used in hunting.
  • Priced at 30 cents, the .223 caliber is not very popular since you can’t use it for hunting, but nevertheless, packs power and is widely used in self-defense.

    .40 S&W

    Manufactured for the FBI initially as a 10mm caliber, the .40 S&W has been heavily popular with such defense and law enforcement agencies. It has more stopping power than other handgun cartridges used and also costs less.


    Here’s what you should know about .40 S&W before choosing to buy it:

  • Bullet weight between 165 to 180 grains, therefore, more lightweight and preferred for quick handling.
  • Packs more stopping power than the 9mm.
  • Costs less with bullets priced at 30 cents.
  • Also used for self-defense.
  • Strong recoil, therefore, not easy to handle.
  • While the FBI has shifted back to use the 9mm cartridge mostly, the .40 S&W is more suitable and is still used by many law enforcement agencies due to more power and energy.


    Apart from the ones listed above, there are many other bullet sizes you’ll find when you go for ammunition shopping, with the more popular ones being the .380ACP, .45ACP, the 12 gauge for shotguns, and many more. There are some less popular ones as well, like the .357 Magnum used in revolvers and more expensive than the rest, priced at 80 cents.

    The Conclusion

    More options mean more confusion, therefore, it can be overwhelming to buy the right caliber considering there are myriad sizes available in the market. Wrong bullet size and type with respect to the gun you possess can severely backfire, literally.

    There are a lot of factors that need to be considered before purchasing the bullet, along with understanding a lot of technical terms. The bullet sizes and types covered above are the most common ones and should give you a fair idea about the popular ammunition.

    Aimpoint Pro Review

    aimpoint pro  is 2 minute of angle red dot for accurate target engagement at all distances.Battery type: 3V lithium battery

    Are you always on the lookout for some cool gadgets and accessories for your precious rifles? You should definitely check out the Aimpoint PRO (Patrol Rifle Optic). The Aimpoint PRO is a very sturdy and rugged device and its red dot optic, which is “always on” is ideal for use by the military, law enforcement and even by citizens. The excellent design of the Aimpoint PRO ensures that it is the best rifle partner for professional, as well as, amateur shooters.



    Aimpoint Pro 
    Pros & Cons

    PROS

     The Aimpoint PRO offers lots of features. In fact, the features offered are much more compared to the traditional rifle optic models.

     They design and develop Aimpoint PRO for use by professional shooters. Therefore, you can expect a high-quality product with an excellent quality lens, build, etc.


     You can keep the PRO turned on continuously for over 3 years on a single battery. The optic is truly an energy saver.


     The Aimpoint PRO comes along with a mount.


     The optic is ideal for emergency combat situations and you can see through the lens of the scope, even with the cover in place. The see-through design of the Aimpoint PRO allows you to see your target even without removing the lens cover.


     The Aimpoint PRO is especially beneficial for law enforcement professionals.


     

    CONS

    ​​​​​​​​​X  The knob of the Aimpoint PRO is too large in size and protrudes out, which can be distracting.

    X  Although you can move the lens covers of the optic around to any position; however, you cannot remove it.

    X  The brightness dial of the optic sticks out.

    X  The body of the Aimpoint PRO is quite thick.

    X  The sight window of the Aimpoint PRO is fairly small and has plenty of bulk around it.

    X  You can improve the field of view of the optic.



     



    Aimpoint Pro

    aimpoint pro is 2 minute of angle red dot for accurate target engagement at all distances.Battery type: 3V lithium battery


    What is Aimpoint Pro?

    Aimpoint was started in 1974 by Swedish entrepreneurs who began looking for ways by which shooting accuracy could be improved. Their objective was to develop a sighting technology that would allow shooters to sight their target quickly and hit moving targets in all types of conditions accurately. They invented the Aimpoint red dot sight, which completely transformed the shooting industry. Today, over 200,000 shooting enthusiasts, hunters, military and police personnel use Aimpoint sights across the world.

    If the price point is not a problem, then the PRO is an excellent device to own. And, whether it catches fire, you freeze it, scuba dive with it or even leave it on for 3 years, the sturdy and durable Aimpoint PRO with its precise and bright two MOA dot is sure to last you a lifetime.

    Features of the Aimpoint PRO

    The Aimpoint PRO is a hard-anodized red dot enclosed tube-style scope that has a mount diameter of 30 mm. The hard-anodized aluminum body of the optic makes it quite rugged to withstand the tough real-world conditions.

    The centreline of the Aimpoint PRO is around 39 mm over the top of the rail along with the spacer and it has an ideal MSR height. Normally, AR sights co-witness around one-third of the way of the glass. Although the RDS of the device is long, it is distortion-free and true 1x and you can see the front sight clearly through the PRO. Without using the spacer, the Aimpoint PRO centers around 30 mm on above the rail. This is ideal for SMGs such as the Scorpion Evo and MP5 or for use on certain rifles and shotguns like the Mini-14, an AK, scout rifle, etc.

    Spacer

    The PRO comes with an AR-15 spacer that is removable and it can be removed for use on firearms like sub-guns and shotguns, Type 81, AK-47 and other firearms having a low line of sight. The PRO features the QRP2 (the rail grabber mount), which is equipped with a tightening knob that is spring-loaded and is effectively a torque wrench that has been pre-calibrated.

    At a specific level of tension, the knob moves up the angled teeth and clicks back to the base of the next. Just 3 clicks allow you to reach the ideal tension level that offers a secure hold without damaging the rail. The entire operation is toolless, effective, fast and extremely easy.

    Knob

    However, the knob may be slightly big in size and may come in the way of the left-hand charging handle. However, the plus is that you can flip the mount around so that the knob is on the right-hand side, which works very well. Alternatively, you can use an optional mount with the PRO, which enables you to swap the PRO from one gun to another easily and quickly or if you just want a much sleeker option without any parts jutting out from either side of the scope.

    The Aimpoint PRO features a single 3-volt battery that will keep the device powered at a brightness level of 7 out of 10, for around 300,000 hours or a whopping 3-4 years. The battery tube contains the adjustment dial, which enables you to adjust the brightness (turn the dial clockwise to brighten the dot and anticlockwise to dim it).

    Night-Vision

    The 1-4 levels are compatible for night-vision, while 5-10 are for daylight use and for use with the naked eye. The level 10 gives extra bright light, which may cause a halo in the optic unless you are viewing with a fully sunny background, which may cause the halo to get washed out. This enables you to see the dot, bright and crisp, even in full sunlight conditions.

    The PRO features captured caps that cover the turrets, which have a wide and deep slot and can be adjusted easily. It accepts a cartridge or coin rim readily. The adjustment clicks are 1/12” in increments of 100 yards (13 mm at 100 m). The Aimpoint PRO is equipped with adjustment cap and battery retainer straps, which ensures that all your pieces are safe and you don’t lose them.

    Lenses

    The lenses of the optic are recessed well into the PRO’s aluminum housing and provides additional protection from scratches, impact, fingerprints, dirt, etc. The front portion of the optic tube is threaded internally so that you can add an anti-reflection device to the scope. The front lens has a bend coating, which makes the device effective in the night and in dark settings. The scope is so efficient at night that it is comparable to conventional night vision devices.

    The lens of the scope is protected by a flip-away solid plastic black front cover and a transparent rear cover, which offer extra protection. The covers are also easy to move out of the way and can be rotated on the body of the PRO so that you can flip it in any direction you want. Since the Aimpoint PRO is designed to be “always on” and always ready for action, the transparent covers on the rear end of the sight enable you to use it with both your eyes open, even with the caps closed. However, needless to say, that the image will be much brighter, clearer and distortion-free without seeing it through the cap.

    Accurate Shots

    The dot of the Aimpoint PRO is precise and allows you to shoot at 100 yards and make fairly accurate shots on smaller targets. And, it is much better to use a small dot with a magnifier. The 2-minute red dot angle of the PRO ensures that the target engagement is accurate at different distances. The Aimpoint PRO is free of any parallax and with the gun rested in line with the target, you can move your head around as much as you want behind the sight and as long as you can see the dot inside the sight, it will remain on target.

    The optic offers an increased probability of 1st shot hit and improved speed on target compared to magnified scopes and iron sights. The Aimpoint PRO can be used with all types of night vision optical devices and can also be used along with the Aimpoint 3x Magnifier and Concealed Engagement device. The PRO has a modular mount that can be used on M4 Carbine, M16 and AR15 rifles.

    Waterproof

    The Aimpoint PRO has a waterproof rating of up to 150 feet and can operate in temperatures between -49°F to 160°F. The device is resistant to chemicals, shock, and vibration. The Aimpoint PRO comes with a 10-year warranty applicable for personal use and 2 years for competition or professional use. The device comes along with a 1/3N or 2L76 battery, a removable spacer, a QRP2 mount and the required tools such as bolts and hex wrenches.

    Overall, the Aimpoint PRO is an “always ready” optic, which has a crisp, bright and precise dot and it comes with a “leave it on” battery that gives you a life of over 3 years. The PRO is very rugged and sturdy and it comes along with a torque-perfect, dual-height mount. If the price of the Aimpoint PRO is not too high for you, then the only drawback of the optic is in terms of its weight. With the battery, AR riser, mount and lens cap, the weight of the Aimpoint PRO is around 11.64 oz.

    Balance

    The Aimpoint PRO is excellent in terms of the balance. While for recreational purposes, you may like to choose an optic that is smaller, more lightweight and not so pricey, for important jobs, the PRO is the ideal choice thanks to its ease of use, ruggedness, and adaptability. Combined with the right night vision and magnifier, the Aimpoint PRO is indeed the perfect optic.

    Aimpoint PRO Specifications

    General Specifications

    1. Technology: Advanced Circuit Efficiency Technology (ACET)
    2. Operating Principle: Reflex collimator sight or red dot sight
    3. Source of Light: LED, completely safe for the eyes
    4. Light Wavelength: Red light – 650nm
    5. Size of Red Dot: 2 MOA (minutes of angle)
    6. Parallax: No centering required, no parallax
    7. Night vision compatible
    8. Surface Coating: Anti-reflex coating
    9. Objective Lens Coating: Multilayer coating
    10. Eye Relief: Unlimited
    11. Magnification: 1x
    12. Dot Intensity Adjustment: Manual rotary knob
    13. Daylight Settings: 6 daylight
    14. NVD Settings: 4 NVD
    15. 1-Click Adjustment: ½-inch at 100 yards or 13mm at 100m

    Power Source Specifications

    Battery: 3 volts lithium battery, type DL 1/3N or 2L76

    Battery Life: 300,000 hours (3+ years of continuous usage)

    Physical Specifications

    1. Housing Material: High strength aluminum
    2. Housing Color: Matte black
    3. Surface Finish: Hard anodized, matte finish
    4. Mounting Method: QRP2 mount for M1913 Picatinny rail, AR15 spacer
    5. Length (Sight Only): 115 mm (4.5 inches)
    6. Conf Length x Width: 130 mm x 55 mm (5.1” x 2.2”)
    7. Width: 55 mm (2.2”)
    8. Maximum Ring Width: 30 mm
    9. Height (Sight Only): 55 mm (2.2”)
    10. Weight (Sight Only, Including Battery): 7.8 oz (220 grams)
    11. The weight of Integrated Mount: 11.6 oz (330 grams) including mount, spacer and lens covers.

    Environmental Specifications

    1. Operating Temperature Range: -45°C to 71° C, (-49°F to 160°F)
    2. Storage Temperature Range: -51°C to 71° C, (-60°F to 160°F)
    3. Water Resistance: Submersible up to 150 ft (45m)
    4. Chemical Resistance: Can withstand occasional contamination due to lubricants, fuels, firearm cleaners, insect repellents, etc.

    Price

    The cost of the Aimpoint PRO is around $500 which is definitely not very cheap. But the many features of the optic make the device well worth the money spent.


     

    Who Is It For?

    The Aimpoint PRO is a highly recommended optic for any serious shooter. Those who are keen on investing in top quality and accurate optics. The Aimpoint Pro is also an excellent product that will greatly benefit law enforcement units.

    Takeaway

    Finally, the Aimpoint PRO is a fantastic high-quality optic and is a reliable device. It will not let you down whether you are using it for shooting competitions, for security purposes or for home defense. They call it the “Pro” for good reason, as its features make the optic unique and highly functional. The Aimpoint PRO can get full marks easily if it weighed a little lesser and if the mounting knob was either removable or smaller in size. Nevertheless, if you’re looking for an efficient optic for your gun, then you should definitely consider the Aimpoint PRO.

    QUALITY

    PRICE

    RATING

    BEST

    $$$

    4/5

    Featured Image via Amazon logo, text and banner added



    Colt 1911 Review

    Colt Model of 1911 U.S. Army

    The Colt 1911 semi-automatic pistol was created by the legendary gun maker John Browning and the gun was adopted by the U.S. Army as the standard firearm. Over a century has gone by and the same gun is still being used by the U.S. Military and has gone on to become a firm favorite with law and security enforcement officers and citizens. The Colt 1911 is one of the most iconic pistols of all times and the timeless design of 1911 is likely to live on.

    The original Colt 1911 handgun was built using the .45 ACP cartridge; however, later the design was adapted so that the gun could accommodate different types of rounds like the .40 Smith & Wesson, 9mm, 10mm, .38 Super and the .357 Magnum. Today, although there are several models, manufacturers, and sizes of the 1911, the Colt remains the gold standard.



    Colt 1911  
    Pros & Cons

    PROS

     Accuracy

     Trigger

      Slim Design and Ergonomics

      ​Power

      ​Disassembly and Reloading

      ​Reliability and Durability

      ​Customization


     

    CONS

    x  Manual slide safety lock and a grip



     



    Colt 1911

    Colt Model of 1911 U.S. Army

    Image CC4 SamLisker via Wikimedia


    Pluses of the 1911 Platform

    So, the question is, what really makes the 1911 a firm favorite of shooters? In reality, there are several factors that make the 1911 a great weapon.

    Accuracy

    The fixed barrel design, long sight radius, light trigger, and soft recoil make the 1911 quite an accurate gun. The moderate recoil and the natural aim make the Colt 1911 fairly accurate in the right hands.

    Trigger

    The 1911 is mostly a single-action pistol with some exceptions. The trigger of the Colt 1911 makes it a dream to shoot with. The trigger offers a light pull, a clean break and a fairly short reset. However, the trigger pull being so light makes it rather unsafe to carry the 1911 pistol chambered without the safety. Nevertheless, the light trigger makes the 1911 excellent for competitions, tactical training and target practice.

    Slim Design and Ergonomics

    The 1911 is a slim and sleek gun with excellent ergonomics. This makes it easier for shooters with smaller hands to grip and handle comfortably. The slim design also makes the pistol ideal for conceal carry, especially for purpose of self-defense.

    Recoil

    You may feel a bit of the recoil, although it is not very harsh and the Colt 1911 manages the recoil quite well due to its heavy weight. And, if you use a smaller round such as a 9mm, then the recoil is even lesser.

    Ease of Concealment

    The 1911 is quite heavy and big in size. However, due to its single-stack magazine, the handgun is quite slim, which makes it ideal for conceal carry and if you opt for a short barrel version like the Defender, Commander, etc., then it makes conceal carry much easier.

    Power

    Most 1911 models are chambered to use .45 ACP caliber ammunition, which is fairly powerful. The Colt 1911 is also available in 9mm and .22 LR calibers.

    Disassembly and Reloading

    Reloading the 1911 is quite simple. All you need to do is, press the button of the magazine release and the empty magazine will be dropped and you can slide a loaded magazine in place.

    The disassembly of the 1911 may, however, be a challenge for a beginner, as it is not very intuitive. However, with repeated practice, it will become much easier. You may want to keep the manual of the pistol handy for the first few times that you disassemble the gun and there are also several YouTube videos that can help you to disassemble the 1911.

    Reliability and Durability

    While the reliability of the 1911 may be a bit lacking and it is also sensitive to various kinds of ammunition, the newer models are much more reliable compared to the older versions. The 1911 is a great pistol for self-defense and the reliability of the handgun can be enhanced by a bit of customization.

    Customization

    The 1911 is among the most customizable guns and you can customize it as much as you require to. You can find accessories, add-ons, parts and spare magazines for your Colt 1911 quite easily as compared to other guns.

    While the 1911 has many pluses, it has its limitations too. The disassembly process is quite complicated than other pistols. It is fairly heavy and can hold only 7 to 8 rounds and requires at least 200-300 rounds before a 1911 starts functioning properly and is reliable. Nevertheless, the 1911 is the most popular pistol designs and is an excellent option for professional shooting competitions, as a range gun, as an SHTF sidearm and as a gun for home defense.

    Factors to Consider before Choosing the Right 1911

    If you have decided that you’re going to buy a Colt 1911, here are a few factors you should consider before you actually go out and buy one.

    Size

    There are essentially 3 basic sizes in which the 1911 is available i.e. Full Size, which is also known as Government, the Officer Size and the Commander Size.

    1. Full Size or Government Size: This is the original size and the most popular one. The pistol has a full-size frame and grip and the barrel is 5 inches. This offers excellent recoil control and balance and the 5-inch barrel offers enhanced accuracy.
    2. Commander Size: This is smaller than the Full-Size pistol. The pistol has a full-size frame but a 4-inch barrel and a shorter slide. This is a comfortable pistol which is easy to handle and is suitable for all types of applications.
    3. Officer Size: This is the smallest size with a small frame and grip and a 3” or 3.5” barrel. The small and compact size makes it ideal for concealed carry; however, it may not offer as much accuracy as the larger models.

    Caliber

    The caliber of the pistol is a very important factor to consider. You need to decide whether you need a .45 Auto which is tried and tested or if you need a caliber for higher velocity or you need something that offers a big kick suited for hunting.

    Safety

    All models have a manual slide safety lock and a grip safety to ensure that the gun is safe until it is fired. The Series 80 guns have extra protection in case the gun is dropped or the other safeties do not work. The Colt 1911 has 2 types of manual safety – standard and ambidextrous. The grip safety comprises a beavertail that helps to protect your hand from being hurt by the hammer spur and allows you to shoot comfortably.

    Sights

    The original version of the 1911 had a simple GI style sight without dots or any other aids for aiming. However, the sights have improved significantly over time and there are many types available. The 3-Dot sights are very common offering clarity and accuracy. Night sights usually contain glowing material in glass vials, also in the 3-Dot arrangement, which is best for home defense and concealed carry weapons. Some models also have rear sights which can be adjusted and are ideal for competition and target shooting.

    Light Rail

    The standard 1911 pistol does not feature a light rail, but it is available in some of the full-size and some Commander models. If you’re using your 1911 for home defense or law enforcement, then you should buy a pistol with a high-quality light and a light rail.

    Colt 1911 Models

    For a very long time, Colt was one of the very few manufacturers of the 1911 and so, there was not much competition. However now, the scenario has changed and almost every gun manufacturer has a 1911 model. Today, Colt offers several variants of the 1911. Let us look at the various Colt 1911 models.

    Colt 1991

    Developed in the year 1991, the Colt 1991 resembles the original M1911 closely, which was used in the WWI. The 1991 enables the shooters to own a traditional 1911 pistol that has been upgraded with some modern-day features. The Colt 1991 makes use of the Series 80 firing mechanism, beavertail grip, spur hammer and a solid trigger.

    The handgun features a flattened mainspring and a long trigger. On the left side, it has a regular GI style thumb safety and a grip safety that has been shortened. The 1991 features GI style fixed sights with white dots for accurate shooting. The pistol is available in a polished blue or a stainless-steel finish.

    Colt Combat Commander

    The latest model of the esteemed Colt Combat Commander is equipped with G10 grips, the beavertail grip safety and a spring recoil mechanism that is very durable, which reduces the recoil significantly. The 4.25-inch long barrel of the gun makes it ideal for conceal carry compared to the full-size gun. The Commander features a blued frame and slide, while the barrel is made of stainless steel. The gun has a classic Commander-style hammer and the pistol is available both in 9mm, as well as, .45 ACP calibers.

    Colt Combat Unit Rail Gun

    The combat rail gun model of the Colt 1911 has been designed for combat and tactical purposes. The Combat Unit Rail is equipped with a rail. The gun also sports the dual spring recoil mechanism like the Colt Combat Commander. It also has a beavertail safety grip, Novak night sights and a trigger guard which is undercut.

    The Combat Unit Rail is equipped with a 1913 Picatinny rail which allows you to attach lasers or lights to the pistol, making it perfect for the purpose of home defense. The front strap of the gun has a checkering that offers enhanced grip in slippery conditions. The gun has extended controls, national match barrel, low glare finish and slide serrations on the front and also the rear. The Combat Unit Rail is available in 9mm and .45 Auto calibers.

    Colt Competition

    The Gold Cup model was introduced by Colt, way back in the 50s as a premium target pistol and was considered as the gold standard 1911 for use in competitions. The Colt Competition 1911 was unveiled recently by Colt. The Colt Competition is available in various calibers, .38 Super, .45 ACP and 9mm and the pistol comes in 2 finishes – matte bluing and stainless steel.

    The pistol features the Series 70 firing system that makes the trigger pull very light. The blue-colored G10 grips, dual recoil spring mechanism, beavertail safety grip, Novak fiber optics sights and all the features of the Colt Competition make it an excellent pistol.

    Colt Defender

    If you are on the lookout for a 1911 pistol which is of a smaller size compared to the Colt Commander, then the Defender can be an ideal choice. With a 3-inch barrel, the Colt Defender has a shorter grip that can accommodate a magazine with a capacity of 6+1 rounds, although it can also accommodate larger 1911 magazines which will extend from the bottom of the pistol.

    The Colt Defender has a beavertail safety grip and Novak sights and comes in both stainless steel, as well as blued finishes. The pistol is available in 9mm and .45 ACP calibers.

    Colt Delta Elite

    This is a classic 10mm gun belonging to the 1911 series and the pistol is also available in a version with a rail that enables you to attach accessories. They equip both the Colt Delta Elite versions with Novak sights with white dots, an improved hammer, slide serrations offering enhanced grip, extended thumb safety, a flared and lowered ejection port which enables smooth cycling and an extended beavertail grip safety. Both the models have a 5-inch barrel and they made them from stainless-steel. They blackened the grips of the pistol and sport the Delta medallion.

    Colt Gold Cup Trophy

    As we already know, the Colt Gold Cup was produced way back in 1950 and was regarded as the smoothest and finest competition pistols ever manufactured. The Gold Cup Trophy is the latest version of the original pistol.

    In addition, the Gold Cup Trophy features a magazine well that is extended, a fiber optic front sight and a rear sight which is completely adjustable. The Gold Cup Trophy has a National Match barrel, an adjustable trigger and front and back straps with 25 LPI checkering. The pistol is available in 9mm and .45 Auto calibers and is an extremely high-quality pistol perfect for competitions.

    Colt M45A1 CQBP

    The Colt M45A1 CQBP was first used by the Marine Corps in 2012. It is essentially a Rail Gun but has a tan coating which makes it resistant to corrosion. They equip the Colt M45A1 CQBP with a 1913 Picatinny rail, G10 grips, Novak tritium night sights and dual recoil spring mechanism.

    Colt Series 70

    Also known as the Mark IV Series 70, the Colt Series 70 pistol makes use of the Series 70 firing mechanism. The exterior of the gun resembles the design of the M1911A1. The used the classic gun in the war right from the WWII to Vietnam.

    The Colt Series 70 has a much shorter trigger, a standard thumb safety and grip, basic sights and an arched housing for the mainspring. They discontinued the stainless-steel version of the Series 70 gun very recently; however, they are still producing the bled version.

    For Self-defense

    They consider the 1911 as a classic and used by the U.S. Military for several decades. The pistol has excellent ergonomics and it is available in many different calibers. However, to make it more reliable and useful for the purpose of self-defense, you may have to make some enhancements to the existing model, which may drive its price higher than it is. Nevertheless, the 1911 is a good gun to own.

    Colt has been manufacturing the 1911 much longer than any other firearm producer and has introduced several variants you can choose from. With the numerous choices available in the market, deciding on the one that is best for you may be quite a difficult task. We hope that our review has helped you understand the different Colt 1911 models available and help you in choosing your perfect gun.

    QUALITY

    PRICE

    RATING

    GREAT

    $$

    4/5

    Featured Image CC4 SamLisker via Wikimedia logo, text and banner added




    Glock 40 Review

    glock 40 features glock 23 pistol A lightweight weapon with the amazing 15-rounds capacity

    If you go out in the gun market, you’ll find people swearing by their Glocks. And why shouldn’t they? This unconventional underdog somehow managed to shatter all perceptions about guns. Especially ones pertaining to the construction and aesthetics of handguns. And should they own a Glock 40, their pride knows no bounds.

    Yes, you are right, we are talking about the plastic frame with no hammer and no safety!

    From when its story began way back in February 1980, the Glock has reigned the handgun market through its impressive design, constant innovation, and an at-par performance.



    Glock 40 
    Pros & Cons

    PROS

     Both strong and light at the same time

     Combination of plastic and steel allowed the gun to weigh only twenty-three ounces

     Reliable and easy to use


     

    CONS

    x  Average style



     



    Glock 40

    glock 40 features glock 23 pistol A lightweight weapon with the amazing 15-rounds capacity

    Featured Image CC4 Canon67 via Wikimedia


    So, How Did It Come About?

    Believe it or not, the Glock handguns happened due to a bit of accidental eavesdropping by Gaston Glock. Post the World War II era the Austrian Army was looking to replace the Walther P-38 guns with something different. Glock, an Austrian citizen happened to overhear this conversation between two Austrian Army colonels.

    Armed with this information, he went to the Minister of Defence and asked if his business could also offer a solution. Receiving an affirmative answer, Glock got down to business. But he knew nothing about guns. He owned a small business that produced field knives and blades for his country’s army. The closest he had been to the battlefield was when he served a few days as a conscript teenager in Wehrmacht during World War II. And that did nothing to teach him anything about guns, leave alone designing them for the benefit of an army.

    Nevertheless, Glock decided to give this a try. In order to learn the inside outs of guns, he first went and purchased some of the best pistols in the market. These included the Swiss-German Sig Sauer P220, the Czech CZ75, the Italian Beretta 92F and the P-1 which was an advanced version of the Walther P-38 already in use by the Army. These became his study material. He pondered over their every detail – how they were built and how they operated. Not only this, he went ahead and researched extensively. Spending hours with firearms specialists, understanding what they would want in a modern handgun.

    The Target

    Glock had his work cut out for him – the Austrian Army knew exactly what it wanted – a high ammunition capacity pistol, significantly more rounds than the eight offered by the Walther P-38, weighed below twenty-eight ounces, had a streamlined design and a consistent, light trigger. All of this packed in under 40 parts.

    After spending a year researching and developing, Glock finally filed for a patent for his pistol design on 30th April 1981. On 19th May 1982, he presented his first four test pistols to the Austrian Army for review. This marked the birth of the very first Glock pistol, the Glock 17.

    The pistol was tested extensively and measured perfectly by all standards. The army accepted it into service and ordered a contract of 20,000 more such pistols from Glock.

    Know a Glock

    The Glock 17 was a game changer in the handguns industry. It is both strong and light at the same time. Made of a polymer frame, its lower half houses a steel fire control group. Its upper half is a unified body of steel. This combination of plastic and steel allowed the gun to weigh only twenty-three ounces, well below the weight required by the Army.

    This also knocked out the other competitors Beretta 92F and the CZ75 that was made entirely of a steel frame. Further, Glock simplified the built of the gun, making it out of just thirty-four parts - nearly half of what the Beretta’s 92F pistol had.

    Pointability

    A key area of focus in Glock’s research was the pistol’s “pointability,”. This refers to the weapons’ ability to work as natural extensions of the hand and eye coordination of the shooter. This is a significant contributor towards the weapon’s ease of aiming and hence the user-friendliness and accuracy.

    This focus towards reliability and ease of use helped Glock create a weapon that was not only beautifully designed but also high on performance. So high that in a competition of ten thousand rounds his pistol failed only once.

    The Glock 17 was one of the first pistols with a capacity as high as 17. Only one amongst the others in the market could only come up to a short fifteen and the next one could do 13. The Glock 17’s capacity more than doubled the P-38’s capacity in chambering 17 rounds of seventeen rounds of nine-millimeter parabellum ammo.

    Safe Action Trigger

    Another big Easter egg in the Glock is the safe action trigger. Most handguns have a safety key that needs to be on or off to ensure that firearm does not discharge accidentally. Glock did away with the old mechanism of the safety which had the key externally on the weapon’s body and had to be maneuvered to lock or unlock. Instead, he introduced an inbuilt mechanism with a two-piece trigger that worked as the safety without the manual key. It has a big trigger and a small trigger. And the gun fires only when both the triggers are pulled, essentially turning it into a fast action point-and-shoot gun that was much appreciated by the law enforcement agencies.

    Around the World

    With all its amazing features, innovation and ease of use, it is no wonder that the Glock 40 has dominated the market since its introduction nearly four decades ago. It has razed its competition time and again and is used by armed forces and law enforcement agencies across the world including the British Armed Forces, the Iraqi military, the Israeli Defense Forces, the Indian Special Forces, the Yemeni military, the U.S. Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command and Army Rangers.

    While Glock was designing and producing his gun for the Austrian Army, the American police officers were being overpowered by criminals. The feeling that their weapon — the classic Smith & Wesson .38-caliber revolver — that they’d been using for three-quarters of a century was now inadequate was growing stronger. An FBI shootout with some bank robbers in Miami in 1986 drove the message home and they knew that they needed a more advanced weapon. At that time, Gaston Glock’s innovation came about as an answer to their prayers. And the Glock 40 quickly became a popular weapon amongst the US lawmen and civilian bodies that adopted the gun culture.

    The Glock Experience

    The Glock 40 is a feature-packed gun that beats all other guns hands down across all categories — innovation, styling, performance and ease of use. But how does it feel to use it?

    The Glock 40 requires some experience and expectation when shooting since its trigger needs some effort and the accuracy needs some practice and getting used to. Its plastic frame requires that the user maintain a firm and strong grip to help it absorb the force of firing.

    Other than that, the gun is extremely reliable and works perfectly fine in adverse conditions too making it a good choice for home and self-defense.

    What Are the Options?

    The Glock has an impressive range of pistols for every objective out there — law enforcement, shooting, hunting, first buy, self-defense, etc. They are available in different sizes, different power, and different caliber. Their smallest is the Model 42. It is a part of their Slimline collection and is a single stack handgun compatible with 380 ACP. Their larger guns include 17L, 34, 41 and 40 with the 40 being probably their most powerful handgun. Its specs make the ballistics of the cartridge comparable to the Magnum revolver.

    The full-size Model 17 in 9mm and 22 in 40 S&W, the compact Model 19 in 9mm and 23 in 40 S&W and subcompact Model 26 in 9mm and 27 in 40 S&W are some of their most popular guns representing their respective size brackets.

    The Glock 40

    The Glock 40 have been one of the most loved Glocks of all times. They have a .40 S&W caliber and are surprisingly similar to the 9mm models. what makes a difference is not the size but the number of rounds these guns can hold. Here’s a lineup of the best Glock 40 to celebrate the genius in each of the models.

    The Glock 22

    Introduced in 1990, the Glock 22 is a full-sized gun. Its reliability and competence made it the weapon of choice for many government agencies and police forces.

    Specs

    • Category: Full size
    • Caliber: .40 S&W
    • Rounds Capacity: 15
    • Weight: 22.9 ounce
    • Length: 7.3″
    • Height: 5.4″
    • Width: 1.18″
    • Barrel: 4.5″
    • Trigger: Striker Fired

    If you want the features of the 22 with more comfort and ease of use, its Gen 4 model can offer it to you. It has a better grip, a backstrap that helped adjust the thickness of the grip and a dual recoil spring that increased the longevity of the gun as compared to the Glock 22. It also had a magazine release that could be changed for left or right-handed shooters.

    When Should You Buy It

    Buy the Glock 22 of its Gen 4 is you are looking for the full-size gun which has been tested in fast-paced environments for its performance, speed, durability, and safety.

    Glock 23 — Compact

    A lightweight weapon with the amazing 15-rounds capacity. Backed by the experience of the police force, its a compact version of the .40 caliber.

    Specs

    • Category: Compact
    • Caliber: .40 S&W
    • Rounds Capacity: 13
    • Weight: 21.2 oz
    • Length: 6.9″
    • Height: 5.0″
    • Width: 1.18″
    • Barrel: 4.0″
    • Trigger Type: Striker-fired

    The gen 4 of the Model 23 adds to the proven features of the former model a texture, a modular back strap and a dual recoil spring. It also lets you add a light or other add-ons if needed.

    When Should You Buy It

    The Model 23 and it's Gen 4 is perfect for those who have small hands or need a concealable model.

    Glock 24

    Also called as the Long Slide, this gun comes with a longer barrel than the typical handguns of its size. the long barrel helps to enhance accuracy and hence, the gun is a popular one in competition shooting. The gun has a longer barrel but its magazine capacity is smaller than the average compact Glocks.

    Specs

    • Category: Full size
    • Caliber: .40 S&W
    • Rounds Capacity: 15
    • Weight: 26.7 oz
    • Length: 8.9″
    • Height: 5.4″
    • Width: 1.18″
    • Barrel: 6.0″
    • Trigger Type: Striker Fired

    Why Should You Buy It

    Its long barrel makes it a good weapon with enhanced accuracy for competition shooting. Despite its barrel, the weapon is easy to carry on you daily.

    Glock 27 — Subcompact

    The subcompact Glock 27 is smaller than the compact guns. Often carried as a backup weapon by the police, its small size can be deceiving as it still packs a punch. the subcompact of the group. It has a capacity of 9+1 and is a popular weapon amongst civilians.

    A Gen 4 model with the backstrap, texture and dual recoil spring is also available for this model.

    Specs

    • Category: Sub-compact
    • Caliber: .40 S&W
    • Rounds Capacity: 9
    • Weight: 19.8 oz
    • Length: 6.3″
    • Height: 4.2″
    • Width: 1.18″
    • Barrel: 3.5″
    • Trigger Type: Striker Fired

    Why Should You Buy It

    A hard hitter, this weapon is a small but powerful one that is concealable and easy to carry as a backup weapon.

    Glock 35 — Competition

    Again a favorite for competition shooters, the Glock 35 has a longer slide making it a good partner in competition shooting in the .40 caliber.

    Its Gen 4 model offers the same upgrades as other Gen 4 models except this one has a MOS (Modular Optic System) that lets you add a reflex optic to the firearm without having to machine the optic to the side.

    Specs

    • Category: Full-size
    • Caliber: .40 S&W
    • Rounds Capacity: 15
    • Weight: 24.5 oz
    • Length: 8.1″
    • Height: 5.4″
    • Width: 1.18″
    • Barrel: 5.3″

    Why Should  You Buy It

    The Gen 4 option of the model 35 is the only version with the MOS configuration in this caliber.

    The Final Shot

    With the wide range of great models it has, zeroing in on your Glock 40 can be difficult. But the good part is that there is no bad Glock 40. No matter which one you end up buying, it is never going to let you down.

    QUALITY

    PRICE

    RATING

    BEST

    $$$

    5/5

     

    Featured Image CC4 Canon67 via Wikimedia logo, text and banner added



    6.55mm Creedmoore Review

    6.5 creedmoor ammunition review in different sizes

    Introduced in 2007 by Hornady, the 6.5 Creedmoor cartridge had a slow start, appearing in rifle shooting competitions, and gained recognition for its low recoil (significantly so, compared to other cartridges in its category). This was seen as risky by some because 6.5mm cartridges were not really considered seriously by most shooters in the United States.

    Ironically, 6.5mm cartridges have long existed in the European market, but weren’t as popular in America because of the lack of availability and interest, since American shooters were already used to the .308s and .264s.

    As had been witnessed before, some great 6.5mm cartridges that were in the market — the 6.5 Remington Magnum, and the .264 Winchester Magnum (to name a few), didn’t do so well in the gun market. So it is a pleasant surprise for the manufacturers that the shooting world is finally sitting up and take notice of this “new” and “hot” cartridge.



    6.55mm Creedmoore  
    Pros & Cons

    PROS

     ​Very Low Recoil: The low weight of the bullet

     ​Versatility: The round can be used both in competitions and hunting

     Accuracy: This is the most accurate round in its category

     Improved Ballistics: The bullet’s flight time is reduced

     

    CONS

    X Cost: The price of this round is more than its counterparts such as the .308 Winchester

    X Shorter barrel life




     


    6.55mm Creedmoore

    6.5 creedmoor ammunition in different sizes

    Featured Image CC4 Hellbus via Wikimedia l

    Price:   Available on SGAmmo.com
    Summary:  The 6.5mm Creedmoor shoots extremely well at long ranges and is swaying long-time shooters as well.
    Manufacturer:  Hornady

    History

    One would think a lot of years would have gone into the development of the 6.5 Creedmoor. But how it came about is actually an interesting story. The cartridge was born out of a discussion between a top-notch shooter (Dennis DeMille) and his ballistician friend (Dave Emary, Hornady) at a championship. The two friends were discussing the shortcomings of the modern-day rounds, and were ‘shooting’ ideas back and forth.

    The discussion was about how the current cartridges in the market were not up to the mark and were causing dissatisfaction among shooters for their below average performance.

    Emary was convinced and started work on the new cartridge when he went back. The year was 2005. After a few back-and-forth sessions, the new cartridge was launched as the 6.5 Creedmoor at a show in 2007. Then, no one had realized the popularity that the new entrant would gain among not only competition shooters, but big/small game hunters because of its superior ballistics, easy availability and competitive pricing.

    Specifications

    Anatomy


    The 6.5mm is not a new round. It has been around for the last 125 plus years by the Norwegian and Swedish armies. Years later, competitive shooters would discover this accurate and powerful round which offered lesser recoil over other calibers, and hence a new market came to exist.

    Diameter: 0.473 inches

    Cartridge Length: 2.825 inches

    Propellent: 44.74 grain

    Velocity Range: 2,940 - 2,665 fps

    Maximum Pressure: 62,000psi

    Case Length: 1.92 inches

    Ballistics

    The 6.5 Creedmoor provides excellent ballistics for a cartridge considering it is a long range in mind. Apart from its low recoil feature, the 6.5 Creedmoor offers wind deflection: the great ballistic coefficient makes short work of slip air resistance, making it carry most of its power towards the target.

    Some long-range shooting enthusiasts have reported shooting a milk jug from a distance of as long as 1 mile! This may seem too far-fetched, but anything close to this is also hugely impressive! Several magazines and shooters have held tests comparing the 6.5 Creedmoor to the .243 and the .308 Winchester, and have found that the 6.5 Creedmooralways performs better than the two.

    The Creedmoor has outperformed most of its counterparts and it has found that not only does it perform admirably when it comes to wind drift, it also has less recoil, making it much easier to shoot. Many shooters have noted that the .308 does not perform well at distances over 700 yards, though it still remains a top choice.

    Customizability

    Because of its shorter length (2.85 inches), it can be chambered for short rifles and those with the AR-10 rifle with no problem at all. Countless other custom gun manufacturers have also followed suit and are producing rifles chambered for this cartridge. The one reason being touted for this superior performance that the Creedmoor has less taper than its counterparts.

    Also, customizing also offers total control over the gun’s configuration, for example, the barrel length.

    What’s more, is that Hornaday doesn’t just stop at factory-produced cartridges. Each 6.5 Creedmoor box comes with a recipe to make your own cartridge, for those who like to make their own by hand. The company also offers up to 10 loads for the cartridge.

    Design

    The great thing about the Creedmoor’s less recoil is that shooters can consistently find their target in the viewfinder quickly. That is an application that the United States military is looking at and we will be covering it later in this article.

    Also, less recoil, in this case, doesn’t mean less power. In comparison, it has been found that the Creedmoor follows the .308’s trajectory almost identically. If one was to summarize the Creedmoor’s performance in a word, it would be “efficient”.

    Counterpart Comparison

    Let’s take a look at how the Creedmoor has perform against its immediate competitor, the Winchester .308:

    Recoil

    The Creedmoor wins easily. Though the Winchester may pack more punch, its recoil as explaine as somewhat excessive, whereas with the Creedmoor, it has been one of its selling points.

    Accuracy

    The Creedmoor shoots flatter and has (less) better wind handling. Also, it has been found to be accurate nearly every time, in particular, from a distance.

    Availability

    The ammunition and weapons available in Creedmoor are more expensive when compared with the Winchester in similar categories. This could be a downside for many. But the plus here is that the Creedmoor is abundantly available!

    Guns That Chamber the 6.5 Creedmoor

    Naturally, with the Creedmoor’s rising popularity, gun manufacturers took notice and started chambering some of their rifles with this caliber. We are listing some of these below for you:

    Ruger Hawkeye FTW Hunter

    Ruger was one of the first manufacturers to chamber guns for the Creedmoor. Available in seven different calibers, the Hawkeye FTW Hunter is a gun for the left-handed and is a bolt-action hunting rifle. It comes in a threaded barrel and holds a capacity of 4 rounds. The rifle has a wooden stock and offers ease in cleaning and durability.

    Seekins Precision Havak Bolt Action Rifle

    Made by a manufacturer that specializes in AR models, this product offers excellent quality and rugged good looks. It comes with a removable box magazine and the muzzle comes threaded for a suppressor.

    Kimber Hunter Rifle

    This weapon comes in a polymer stock and offers a satin steel barrel finish and an adjustable trigger. It holds a capacity of 4 rounds and a detachable magazine for easy and quick loading. The suggested use ranges from varmint to predators and deer.

    S&W M&P 10

    The M&P 10 offers a 10-round clip (+1), has a two-stage match trigger, is semi-automatic and ambidextrous so both right and left-handed shooters will be comfortable with it. This is an AR-type rifle that will perform equally well while hunting or in competitive shooting as well as personal defense.

    Savage 10BA Stealth

    This bolt-action rifle offers a 5-round capacity, adjustable trigger and comes in matte black color. This rifle is for the left-handed and has a sleek design and has a tactical look and feel. The buttstock is shock absorbing and the muzzle comes threaded with a protector.

    Pricing

    The Creedmoor’s pricing is competitive and is available at a price range of $28 - $32 for a box of 20 (at a price of about $1.60 per round). Buying these in larger boxes greatly reduces the price (some websites have priced it as low as 70 cents per round).

    What Is This Being Used For?

    Precision Rifle Shooting

    As we know by now, the Creedmoor started its life as ammunition for precision-rifle shooters. It had a slow start, but quickly gained popularity through word-of-mouth and suddenly everyone wanted a rifle chambered in Creedmoor 6.5.

    With a round like the Creedmoor, long-range shooting feels like a breeze, even for the novice, because fewer adjustments have to be made to the gun.

    Hunting

    Long-time shooters have argued that .260 Remington and the 6.55 Creedmoor almost run side by side when compared. But the fact is, that where the .20 Remington lacks, the Creedmoor excels. In the shooting world, the Remington has been well known, whereas comparatively, the Creedmoor is a late entrant.

    People who have just entered competitive shooting will find it much easier to adapt to the long range, low recoil Creedmoor when compared with the already existing .308 Winchester and the Remington. As a result, hunters were quick to note the many benefits of switching to the Creedmoor. The other two have been popular with those who reload their own.

    More recently, the Creedmoor has come neck to neck with the .308 in big game hunting in North America, owing to its all-around flatter trajectory and less recoil. These species include:

    1. Coyotes
    2. Mountain goats
    3. Feral hogs
    4. Elk
    5. Antelope
    6. White-tail deer

    As a result, manufacturers have started producing 6.5 Creedmoor ammunition in the “big game flavor” as well.  Though typically not considered the “hunting caliber”, hunters have reported excellent results while shooting big game with these Creedmoor variants. Many hunters have claimed to drop big game over a large distance with the Creedmoor, and there are glowing commendations on various blogs on the internet.

    Armed Forces Take Interest

    In a previous article, we had briefly discussed how the United States military is looking to replace its main rifle, the M16, and is looking for a replacement weapon and as a result, looking at new ammunition as well.

    Not surprisingly, the popularity of the Creedmoor has not escaped the army. The first thing that comes to mind when you wonder why this “upstart” is even being considered by the military, is probably its long range. The second thing that pops up is, of course, the reduced recoil.

    More recently, the United States Special Operations Command has switched to the 6.5 Creedmoor, replacing their more standard, 7.62mm ammunition. There are also talks that the army is also looking for a new gun to go with this ammunition.

    Tests concluded by SOCOM officials in 2017 demonstrated that the Creedmoor had a much longer effective range than the existing 7.62mm round, reduced recoil and wind drift. SOCOM has been known for moving with the times and keeping in touch with advancements in modern warfare. The casing on both the Creedmoor and the 7.62 is the same, so it essentially means that in case it comes to a conversion, only the barrel needs to be changed because both rounds use the same magazine. This will save costs, and most importantly, time.

    Conclusion

    For those looking for precision shooting, the 6.5 Creedmoor has a ballistic advantage over the .308 and hence it performs better. For those who spend a long time at the shooting range, this cartridge is recommended because of its low recoil and in general opinion, a fair price for the experience.

    Out of the shooting range and if you decide to go hunting, this is a good alternative to other available options. Hunters across the spectrum have given their verdict and it is proven that the Creedmoor can take out a target at 500 yards.

    The biggest advantage? What is not to like about the 6.5 Creedmoor when you can use it both for hunting and at the range, use it in other modern firearms, it does not falter at long ranges and offers much less recoil than other options available in the same category! Also, the rifles chambered in the Creedmoor are easy to shoot.

    The battle between the 6.5 Creedmoor and its counterparts is far from over, but one thing is clear — the Creedmoor is here to stay for a long, long time.


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